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Octopus Prime

Jingle Engine
(He/Him)
Alisia Dragoon is a game I often confuse with El Viento.

It’s not that game, they are unrelated except in the broadest terms
 

Sarge

hardcore retro gamin'
Weirdly enough, I can see why you'd get them mixed up. I don't love either, personally - I remember having a fairly hard time picking out enemy shots in Alisia Dragoon, which dampened my enthusiasm for it. It's still solid, though. El Viento is... weird, in that Wolf Team sort of way. But it's a fair sight better than Earnest Evans.
 

Phantoon

I cuss you bad
I don't have the pricier NSO, but I will recommend to anyone that has never played Beyond Oasis (it's available in a bazillion ways) to play it. It's really, really good.
It really, really is. And Alisia Dragoon has a lot to recommend, once you get your head round it
 

ArugulaZ

Fearful asymmetry
As a fan of Thexder, I was big into Alisia Dragoon, and the character designs by Gainax and that masterful soundtrack by Mecano Associates really brought it over the top.

The way I see it, 1992 represented something of a sophomore slump for the Genesis, and it desperately needed something impressive to keep my eyes from wandering to competing systems. Sure, there was Streets of Rage 2 and Sonic 2, but 1992 was also the year that brought us Chakan: The Forever Man and Bart vs. the Space Mutants and Greendog the Beached Surfer Dude and Chase HQ II and Ex-Mutants and Action 52, and a buttload of 16-bit badness. The Genesis needed a game like Alisia Dragoon to balance out the quality of its software library and keep the boat from capsizing during a rough year.

I mean, now I can see the game's flaws. Alisia's homing lightning means that you can't manually aim your attacks, and you often run out of juice, leaving you unarmed and helpless at the worst possible times. But in 1992, I adored Alisia Dragoon. That polished presentation was exactly what that system needed at the time.
 
That was about when the trend for bigger character sprites started ruining platformers.

El Viento has a lot of other problems, though. It's totally janky and you just have to tank a lot of hits as I recall.
 

conchobhar

What's Shenmue?
Surprised to see the lukewarm reaction to Alisia Dragoon here; in my eyes it's one of the best games in the Genesis library.

It really, really is. And Alisia Dragoon has a lot to recommend, once you get your head round it
"Get your head round it" is right; the first time I played it, I got a game over very quickly and didn't understand what I was doing wrong. The key is to realize that despite how it seems, it's not actually a blazing-fast action game, but something a bit more deliberate. Once I started poking around the stages to uncover power-ups, paying attention to which familiar I used, and just taking encounters a bit slower, the whole thing fell into place.
 

Phantoon

I cuss you bad
"Get your head round it" is right; the first time I played it, I got a game over very quickly and didn't understand what I was doing wrong. The key is to realize that despite how it seems, it's not actually a blazing-fast action game, but something a bit more deliberate. Once I started poking around the stages to uncover power-ups, paying attention to which familiar I used, and just taking encounters a bit slower, the whole thing fell into place.
Yeah, once I realised what I was supposed to do I really appreciated it. It's hugely different to everything else and I love games that do that.
 

ShakeWell

Slam Master
(he, etc.)
The way I see it, 1992 represented something of a sophomore slump for the Genesis, and it desperately needed something impressive to keep my eyes from wandering to competing systems. Sure, there was Streets of Rage 2 and Sonic 2, but 1992 was also the year that brought us Chakan: The Forever Man and Bart vs. the Space Mutants and Greendog the Beached Surfer Dude and Chase HQ II and Ex-Mutants and Action 52, and a buttload of 16-bit badness. The Genesis needed a game like Alisia Dragoon to balance out the quality of its software library and keep the boat from capsizing during a rough year.

Every year has more bad games than good one, but SoR2, Sonic 2, Thunder Force IV, and Alisia Dragoon make it a banner year, tbh. Not to mention stuff like Sol-Deace, MERCS, Darius II, Atomic Runner, Krusty's Fun House and Gleylancer. Also, Chakan and Greendog are both totally fine.

Surprised to see the lukewarm reaction to Alisia Dragoon here; in my eyes it's one of the best games in the Genesis library.

Yes.
 

muteKi

Ell eye ell why, ee ee ell why
Surprised to see the lukewarm reaction to Alisia Dragoon here; in my eyes it's one of the best games in the Genesis library.


"Get your head round it" is right; the first time I played it, I got a game over very quickly and didn't understand what I was doing wrong. The key is to realize that despite how it seems, it's not actually a blazing-fast action game, but something a bit more deliberate. Once I started poking around the stages to uncover power-ups, paying attention to which familiar I used, and just taking encounters a bit slower, the whole thing fell into place.

Yep, it's a similar story to Ranger-X (though that game does, in some places, favor getting in a dude's face with a big gun over being methodical, though it's a strategy that is more likely to murder than help you).
 

Sarge

hardcore retro gamin'
Ranger X is awesome - once I figured out what the game wanted from me, it's one of the best new-to-me experiences I've had with a Genesis game.
 

Kirin

Summon for hire
(he/him)
So, is there no actual good way to view your Switch library through a web browser?

I googled around and the answer that comes up is go to the Nintendo Account website -> Profile Settings -> Shop Menu -> Purchase History. This shows me a tiny fraction of what's on my Switch. I noticed in tiny print it says that the list only goes back two years of history, so that may be the main problem there. A weird thing is, from the exact same menu, I can instead view my wishlist, which shows in addition to unpurchased games a lot of games it indicates I already purchased that happen to still be on the wishlist... so like, it knows I own these games, even though they don't show up in the history list. Frustrating. Why can't it just generate a list of everything it knows I own?

(I also found a *different* purchase history page through the My Nintendo Store, which shows even *less* of what I own. Yay.)
 

Positronic Brain

Out Of Warranty
(He/him)
Why can't it just generate a list of everything it knows I own?
Nintendo gotta Nintendo! Give it a gen or two -they'll fix it as something as they find something else that should be ridiculously intuitive and/or a solved problem but they have to implement their own way.
 
Sure would be nice if I could indicate my interest in buying a N64 controller for Switch Online. Perhaps even "pre-order" one or be added to a list so when one is in stock, I could buy it, rather than just randomly hoping I'm online in the 30 seconds they're restocked. But clearly that's impossible, Nintendo is just doing its best.
 

LBD_Nytetrayn

..and his little cat, too
(He/him)
Sure would be nice if I could indicate my interest in buying a N64 controller for Switch Online. Perhaps even "pre-order" one or be added to a list so when one is in stock, I could buy it, rather than just randomly hoping I'm online in the 30 seconds they're restocked. But clearly that's impossible, Nintendo is just doing its best.
They always are, and sometimes that's the problem.
 

muteKi

Ell eye ell why, ee ee ell why
I mean I'm pretty sure that as far as any marketing technique for N64 games can be called "objectively correct", this would be it. Guess they're getting fewer takers for their premium online stuff than they expected -- go figure!
 

Ludendorkk

(he/him)
Still think they'd do better just selling them separately again.

Basically everyone who's ever commented on Virtual Console sales has said that people only want to buy the same 10 games over and over and ignore everything else; the essence of people not putting their money where their extremely loud Twitter mouths are
 

ArugulaZ

Fearful asymmetry
Like, hey man, I buy some of the weird stuff, too. You should check out all the Neo-Geo and arcade games on my Switch! (I would buy even more if they were ever on sale! Hint hint, Hamster! )
 

LBD_Nytetrayn

..and his little cat, too
(He/him)
I feel like there's a compromise that could be reached. At the time of VC, $5-$10 was a fair little bit for us to spend on an unknown quantity.

Being able to try before you buy would be nice, but I know they didn't have demos for a lot of those games, and while later stuff would show they could effectively create virtual demos, I get not doing it.

Where we are now, I think there could be a good sweet spot: get Nintendo Switch Online, play a game on one of the retro platforms they have there, and if you like it -- like, really like it -- then you can have the opportunity to buy it and play it without worry of NSO.

Basically what Game Pass does. Except you can buy the games without having Game Pass. And you get a discount if you do.
 

Phantoon

I cuss you bad
Basically everyone who's ever commented on Virtual Console sales has said that people only want to buy the same 10 games over and over and ignore everything else; the essence of people not putting their money where their extremely loud Twitter mouths are
Yeah, I appreciate I'm a vanishing minority here in that I have a ton of Virtual Console games. It's a shame it apparently didn't work then; legal availability of these old games with good emulation was fantastic.
 

Ludendorkk

(he/him)
Don't get me wrong, a la carte sales of retro games is my preferred sale method as well, but there is a reason basically everyone switched to either sub services or franchise bundles like Capcom, Konami, and Squeenix have
 

Violentvixen

(She/Her)
My Switch fan has been kinda loud for a while (especially when starting Animal Crossing) and this morning leveled up to be concerningly loud with a touch of grinding, so much that my husband looked over wondering what the hell it was.

A quick Googling seems to be a faulty cooling fan and I'm out of warranty so it'll be at least $100 to send it into Nintendo, although I'm not completely clear on that because this issue isn't clearly on the website to submit support tickets.

No one in town does Switch repairs and my tremor has gotten worse so I'm not comfortable doing it myself. Can anyone recommend a place to ship it for repairs, or is sending it into Nintendo likely to be the best option? Oh and I've done all the recommended cleaning although I'll certainly give it another shot.
 

Sarcasmorator

Same as I ever was
(He/him)
If you have no one local I'd figure Nintendo is probably your best bet. I've had consoles repaired before (PS3, some years ago) when there was a local guy who did that, and it was at least $60. Factor in shipping costs and you're going to hit close to a hundred anyway, I would think.
 
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