• Welcome to Talking Time's third iteration! If you would like to register for an account, or have already registered but have not yet been confirmed, please read the following:

    1. The CAPTCHA key's answer is "Percy"
    2. Once you've completed the registration process please email us from the email you used for registration at percyreghelper@gmail.com and include the username you used for registration

    Once you have completed these steps, Moderation Staff will be able to get your account approved.

  • TT staff acknowledge that there is a backlog of new accounts that await confirmation.

    Unfortunately, we are putting new registrations on hold for a short time.

    We do not expect this delay to extend beyond the first of November 2020, and we ask you for your patience in this matter.

    ~TT Moderation Staff

Movie Time 2.0: TT mini reviews

karzac

(he/him)
Arrival is exactly the sort of energy I've always wanted out of a first contact movie. I really love it when stories are about solving a problem and not actual direct conflict.

I love that movie so much. Haven't rewatched it since it was in theatres, I really should get around to it. Definitely my favourite Villeneuve - it's got the same haunting tension of his other movies, but without the overwhelming bleakness.
 

clarice

bebadosamba
I like Arrival too, but i wasn't too keen on the *physical* consequences of a way of understanding language. I'm sort of a physicist, so eh.

Wolf Children is one of my favorite movies of all time. Thanks for the Wolfwalkers recommendation, Tegan!

Ah, right now i'm rewatching a couple of Hong Sang Soo movies. I like his movies so much. They're so singular in the way they talk about the little ways in which we mismatch one another. Just rewatched Right Now, Wrong Then. It's the third time i watch it. I like it!
 

karzac

(he/him)
I like Arrival too, but i wasn't too keen on the *physical* consequences of a way of understanding language. I'm sort of a physicist, so eh.

I agree with that. The Sapir-Whorf theory is debunked, if my understanding of current linguistics is correct, and in any case, Arrival takes the consequences of the theory to the absolute extreme. I think it works best as a thematically appropriate technique for the story their telling, rather than a literal proposal for what would happen when learning an alien language.
 

Exposition Owl

Doctor Hoo
(he/him/his)
I like Arrival too, but i wasn't too keen on the *physical* consequences of a way of understanding language. I'm sort of a physicist, so eh.

I thoroughly agree with you, but quite a bit of 20th century philosophy of time argued that the way time appears to flow sequentially is literally a delusion caused (or at least worsened) by language. So, it's a weird take, but at least it's a weird take with a lot of scholarship behind it. I've actually proposed a paper for an upcoming conference that would explore the Ted Chiang story the movie is based on through the lens of the physics and philosophy of time, so we'll see if I end up writing that.
 

clarice

bebadosamba
That makes sense. The structure of language suggests that there is a unique, universal time, i.e., a clock in the background. And that does not seem to be the case. If we're aware of the structure of language, it might be easier to accept things like the results of relativity about time (when we focus about what is being measured, what are our measurement tools, what is being related to what), time translation invariance etc. Kinda like the argument Nietzsche made that we believe in God because of grammar. But the jump to an alternate structure of language making you travel through time is too much for me, haha. :p I'm just being boring, though! Sorry!

And anyway, i want to read this article!
 
Wolfwalkers is fantastic. Beautifully-animated too. Right up there with Wolf Children in the pantheon of gorgeous animated werewolf movies.
Ooh, thank you for the reminder of Wolfwalkers. I haven't done my Apple TV trial yet so might use it for this.
 

Exposition Owl

Doctor Hoo
(he/him/his)
That makes sense. The structure of language suggests that there is a unique, universal time, i.e., a clock in the background. And that does not seem to be the case. If we're aware of the structure of language, it might be easier to accept things like the results of relativity about time (when we focus about what is being measured, what are our measurement tools, what is being related to what), time translation invariance etc. Kinda like the argument Nietzsche made that we believe in God because of grammar. But the jump to an alternate structure of language making you travel through time is too much for me, haha. :p I'm just being boring, though! Sorry!

And anyway, i want to read this article!
If what you wrote is boring, then most of my academic writing is boring in the same way, in which case I’m in trouble.

Anyway, I’d argue that our language about time still works pretty well so long as we take each statement as applying only to the speaker’s own reference frame. What I say refers to the place and time in which I say it, rather than to the whole universe, as if I didn’t have a particular point of view.

If conference accepts my paper proposal, then I’ll be sure to send you a copy once it’s written. Thanks for your interest!
 

clarice

bebadosamba
Anyway, I’d argue that our language about time still works pretty well so long as we take each statement as applying only to the speaker’s own reference frame. What I say refers to the place and time in which I say it, rather than to the whole universe, as if I didn’t have a particular point of view.

Ah, that makes sense! This made me think about how to talk about time and relativity in a classroom, which is the sort of thing i'm usually thinking since i'm a high school physics teacher.

Anyway, just saw One Cut Of The Dead for the first time. I never see horror movies because i'm a scaredy cat, but a friend of mine said i would have a blast watching it and he was right. I love movies like this, where previous scenes are recontextualized. Very fun. I want to watch it with a lot of people.
 

Octopus Prime

Mysterious Contraption
(He/Him)
Continuing the Every Canon Disney Movie watch with Alice in Wonderland. And I thought I was done with the carton compilation movies, but NOPE! It's just that this one has a semi-coherent plot that it mostly sticks with. It's also based on a book by one of the few childrens entertainers who is a worse person than Walt himself!

Kid sees a well dressed rabbit, figures "Okay, it's history times, there's no Gameboys yet, guess I'll go look at that" and then falls into a VERY aggravating fantasy kingdom where she judges the culture very harshly. Given what we see of the regency, it's little wonder that the place has a hard time of things.

I've read enough Ant-Man comics to know that changing you size as often as Alice does can wreak havoc with the mind; I was half expecting her to build an Ultron before it was over, but instead she mangles a perfectly good flamingo and threatens to murder the entire royal court.

Then she wakes up and the movies over. No moral.

In conclusion, there's little reason to visit Wonderland for anything other than humanitarian reasons
 
I agree with that. The Sapir-Whorf theory is debunked, if my understanding of current linguistics is correct, and in any case, Arrival takes the consequences of the theory to the absolute extreme. I think it works best as a thematically appropriate technique for the story their telling, rather than a literal proposal for what would happen when learning an alien language.

I think it's less that Sapir-Whorf is debunked per se and more that the most extreme view of Sapir-Whorf way overstated things. Language does influence thought, but in the same sense that being enmeshed in any particular conceptual framework influences thought. (Also obviously it's basically impossible to fully separate linguistic and cultural influence, etc. etc. )

In any case, yeah, I think it's best to approach Arrival in the same way that you might approach science fiction where "humans only use 10% of their brain... what if you could unlock the other 90%???" They're not suggesting that notion is literally correct in reality, they're positing an alternative reality where it is in fact correct. If language did in fact do the things that happen in Arrival, then obviously that would have huge implications for Sapir-Whorf!
 

Johnny Unusual

(He/Him)
The Trial of the Chicago 7

As a piece of film, this is a pretty good actor's showcase with some very Sorken dialogue, for both better or worse. I don't enough about the actual history that making Richard Schultz a sympathetic figure is a good idea. I also think that while I expect fact to become fiction in some of these films, there are probably things that could have had more impact if it hewed closed to the truth. But as a piece of film, I'm mostly positive on this one, with the actors doing a great job and Sorken proving himself to be a competent director (I'm told his first big film, Molly's Game, is something of a mess).
 

Rascally Badger

El Capitan de la outro espacio
(He/Him)
Molly's Game has some strong sequences and some good Sorkin dialogue, but it is also just kind of baffling at times.
 

karzac

(he/him)
Yeah, I felt similarly about that movie. I really dislike the narrative technique of just having the main character describe everything that's happening. Also, that conversation she has with Kevin Costner near the end feels like peak "Sorkin believes that a woman's problems must always be solved by a man".
 

Adrenaline

Post Reader
(He/Him)
The Trial of the Chicago 7

As a piece of film, this is a pretty good actor's showcase with some very Sorken dialogue, for both better or worse. I don't enough about the actual history that making Richard Schultz a sympathetic figure is a good idea. I also think that while I expect fact to become fiction in some of these films, there are probably things that could have had more impact if it hewed closed to the truth. But as a piece of film, I'm mostly positive on this one, with the actors doing a great job and Sorken proving himself to be a competent director (I'm told his first big film, Molly's Game, is something of a mess).
The real trial was a lot more wacky and out of control than the one in the movie.
 
I watched Final Fantasy: the Spirits Within on Amazon Prime. This the first time I've rewatched it since seeing it in the theater in 2001. The idea of a ghost alien invasion is pretty cool and well executed.

However, the plot of the film is pretty non-traditional and there are long sequences of dialog about wave patterns and Gia. I liked revisiting the movie. But it is in no way surprising to me that it was not a commercial hit.

***
I also watched Scoob on HBO Max. As a kid who grew up watching Scooby-Doo Where Are You reruns, I found a lot to enjoy from Scoob. A lot of homages to Scooby Doo and Hanna Barbera history both large and small in the film. It felt to me like the creators had reverence for the source material.

The decision to have Scoob cross over with a bunch of other Hanna Barbera is interesting. Having cross overs is consistent with later iterations of Scooby Doo. However, the cross over characters take some of the spotlight off of the Scooby Doo characters. I would say Blue Falcon, Dynomutt, and Dee Dee Skyes have more screen time and importance than Fred, Velma and Daphne in the film. It feels like a curious choice for the first entry in what I assume is the first entry in the Scoob franchise.
 
Last edited:

Octopus Prime

Mysterious Contraption
(He/Him)
I can’t lie, I was pretty let down by Christine, probably the weakest of Carpenters’ 80s output. Didn’t like any of the characters enough to feel sympathetic to any of them before a monster car started hunting them, and Murder Smooshing did nothing to change that. The towns police were surprisingly quick to accept “Possessed Car Did Murders” as an explanation. Also, far less Car Does Murders than I was expecting.

I was pleased with myself for recognizing The Shovel Man from Home Alone immediately, and disappointed with myself for not recognizing Grandpa Fred from Gremlins 2 until I looked him up.

I liked the visuals though. I’m a sucker for a good “machine magically rebuilds itselfs” shot. Very scattershot approach to the Radio Plays Ironic Song bit, half the time the car started playing music about it threatening people, and the rest of the time it was just whatever 50s song John a carpenter could get clearance for
 

Tegan

dirtbag lesbian
(She/Her)
Watched The Willoughbys yesterday. The takeaway that some people are just terrible is good, otherwise it's kind of all over the place and not very good; and also Ricky Gervais is in it as a completely needless, inconsequential character who is nonetheless present for the entire movie, getting his greasy little hands all over it.
 

Johnny Unusual

(He/Him)
Four Came For Sartana

My journey through largely unofficial Sartana movies on Amazon Prime continue. This one is better than "Shadow of Death" but not as good as the one actual Sartana film I saw. But it helps that it had a formula I liked: Sartana must kill four super assassins sent after him. The villain reveal is super obvious but I love the introduction of the biggest assassin, Silky, a trained sharpshooter. You know that scene in a samurai movie or a western when the two characters have a duel and one falls and the other guy is walking around a bit but he finally goes and the first guy to fall was the actual victor. This has the most drawn out one of those I've ever seen.
 

Rascally Badger

El Capitan de la outro espacio
(He/Him)
Barb and Star Go to Vista Del Mar is actually kind of great? Like, its a very early 00s style goofy comedy, and we don't get those too often any more. I can't really explain it; Kristen Wiig and Annie Mumalo are a couple of middle aged women who go on a vacation in Florida. Also, essentially a Bond villain is trying to destroy the town. Each individual piece is kind of inexplicable?
 

Vaeran

perfect world
(he/him)
Late to the party on this one, but Bumblebee: A Transformers Story is just as enjoyable and refreshing as everyone says. I especially liked the colorful, easily readable designs of the Transformers after watching identical grey masses of unidentifiable shrapnel slam into each other in the Michael Bay movies. I hope the franchise follows this model going forward instead of whatever the hell they were doing before.
 

YangusKhan

does the Underpants Dance
(He/Him/His)
I watched Panic Room last night. It was one of the few remaining holes in my David Fincher backlog. I'd recommend it for anyone who likes thrillers! It's got a great mix of protagonists that are clever but antagonists that are also clever, and it's definitely not a home invasion movie that's trying to revel in its own violence.
 

Sarcasmorator

Same as I ever was
(He/him)
I watched Panic Room last night. It was one of the few remaining holes in my David Fincher backlog. I'd recommend it for anyone who likes thrillers! It's got a great mix of protagonists that are clever but antagonists that are also clever, and it's definitely not a home invasion movie that's trying to revel in its own violence.
Ah'm Raoul.
 

Octopus Prime

Mysterious Contraption
(He/Him)
Good news; The Mist holds up as one of the better Stephen King adaptations. And better Tony Jones roles!

CG is a bit dated, and Andre Braugher left the movie too soon. I like to think he left that grocery store, and made it all the way to Brooklyn and started a new career as a cop.
 

4-So

Spicy
Watched Dredd last night because I wanted something relatively short to watch while eating a late dinner before bed. It was pretty good! I appreciated the cheek of the slo-mo shots having an in-universe reason for existing.
 
Dredd is awesome. Dredd makes me wish that we would get more small scale fantasy and sci-fi movies rather than world threatening blockbusters. Maybe that is on me to seek out more non-mainstream fare.

I watched the Evil Clergyman on Tubi. Its a 30 minute story from a planned horror anthology Pulse Pounders. It was shot in 1988 and the film was thought to be lost. It was discovered in 2011 on VHS. The picture quality is pretty rough as a result.

Evil Clergyman has Barbara Crampton, Jeffery Combs and David Gale in another H.P. Lovecraft adaption. I would say if you like Re-Animator, From Beyond or Castlefreak its absolutely worth checking out. I thought it was a fun little horror short.
 
I can’t lie, I was pretty let down by Christine, probably the weakest of Carpenters’ 80s output. Didn’t like any of the characters enough to feel sympathetic to any of them before a monster car started hunting them, and Murder Smooshing did nothing to change that. The towns police were surprisingly quick to accept “Possessed Car Did Murders” as an explanation. Also, far less Car Does Murders than I was expecting.

I was pleased with myself for recognizing The Shovel Man from Home Alone immediately, and disappointed with myself for not recognizing Grandpa Fred from Gremlins 2 until I looked him up.

I liked the visuals though. I’m a sucker for a good “machine magically rebuilds itselfs” shot. Very scattershot approach to the Radio Plays Ironic Song bit, half the time the car started playing music about it threatening people, and the rest of the time it was just whatever 50s song John a carpenter could get clearance for
I'm gonna watch this soon.

Have/plan to watch a bunch of Carpenter films I've never seen (Christine) or haven't seen in a while because of Blank Check. They are all a lot of fun? Unsurprising. I have a lot of affection for his later work. Okay, I can't tell if I like Village of the Damned so much because I apparently vaguely remembered everything about it from when I was a child, but who cares? I did like it so much and found it very spooky. Ghosts of Mars? What if everyone were queer but not the romantic leads because it's 2001? lol. (saw it in theaters, I think!) Vampires? Fucked up how much I like James Woods in everything I see him in. (just Videodrome, I guess) In the Mouth of Madness? Sam Neil has an indeterminate accent and Julie Carmen (Fright Night Part II) is the co-star. Yes. Prince of Darkness just really slaps.

Oh, also watched all of Elaine May's (directed) films bc of Blank Check and she is a genius. Can't decide whether Mikey and Nicky or The Heartbreak Kid are my favorite but doesn't matter. They're all worth watching.
 
Last edited:
Top