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Iaboo, Youaboo, Weallaboo for Anime!

clarice

bebadosamba
Yes, that's a wonderful episode, haha. It's so fun seeing these characters interacting with one another - taking people to drink together so they can make amends, waiting for the food to arrive, saying goodbye to a colleague, etc. Like you said, mundane stuff!

It's not afraid to be weird, too, with monsters and ghosts, hahaha. I had forgotten how many episodes they actually try to be a little scary - like someone telling a scary story, haha.
 

Tegan

dirtbag lesbian
(She/Her)
Steins;Gate's most fascinating time travel paradox is that it was made in 2011 but somehow still managed to star a Rick and Morty fan
 

Alixsar

The Shogun of Harlem
(He/him)
Man, make sure to check the box if you had "gets rape-y" on your Cells at Work! Code Black Bingo Card. Cuz yeah...wasn't expecting that!

Edit: The Internet says there's...EIGHT spin offs for Cells at Work??! And there's a Covid special coming soon?!!? What in the world...
 
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For all the reasons you guys discussed, Patlabor on Television is the definitive version of Patlabor to me. The length and wide range of the types of stories it tells just allows for a more thorough exploration of the characters, setting, and themes. It's also generally an upbeat and positive show, versus the original OVAs and the films that get a touch too serious for my tastes. There's also just... more of it! For a thing I like, I generally enjoy having more of that thing. And versus the other animated entries to the franchise, it's the one that focuses on Noa the most and explores her character the best. Which is, you know, pretty dope since Izumi is one of the best protagonists there is in anime, never mind one that's female. Every time a Gundam continually won't let a female pilot be the main lead because muh plamo sales, I keep thinking about how Patlabor is now over 30 years old and it proved that fucking dumbass caveman mentality wrong decades ago.

I put Escaflowne on the list a long time ago because I respect the noses and robots with capes.
I meant to respond to this earlier and didn't. Does this mean you've got it on a to watch list? Or that it's already on a personal merit list of yours.

The noses and character/mecha designs in general are indeed really really good. I generally don't like looking back on time periods with irrational fondness as somehow being better than now. But big ole honkers in anime is something I miss, and was a thing you used to see more of but largely died out with the passing of the 90s.

Noses in anime in general are a really interesting topic to me actually, as they're kind of this microcosm for broader meta trends in anime/manga over time. Drawing bigger noses on characters used to be one of the ways anime/manga used to code beauty, especially in shojo material. (Same with other exaggerated body features like broad shoulders, tall/lanky statures, and big hands.) The idea being, that larger noses used to historically be considered attractive in Japanese society, on account of how rare and exotic they were considered in a society where noses on average run fairly small and flat. Part of that was just always there and an inherent novelty in something rare, but another big part of that is just an innate increasing international awareness in the post-war period as Japanese society opened up and was flooded with Western media and Western/white ideas of beauty. Which on the one hand, is actually kind of a toxic occurrence for Japanese society itself, since it's one of those things associated with cultural imperialism and the soft bigotry of unrealistic body images onto a society that doesn't fit those molds. There's pretty interesting/horrifying data how the average cup-size of women in Japan rose significantly post-war as large voluptuous breasts weren't traditionally attractive in Japanese society, but became more and more the ideal and thus socially selected for post-war.

And it's just interesting to me that this trend of larger and larger noses on anime/manga characters kind of peaked in the 90s. And I don't think it's a coincidence that the 90s was also the peak of broad narrative trends in anime/manga that actively sought influences from foreign media and included many adaptations of foreign stories, or including foreigners and foreign lands into their media. In the 80s and earlier, most people who made anime, went to school for various other subject matter and just kind of ended up in animation by accident. The old guard of animators like Miyazaki and Tomino were very well read, broadly educated folks who almost fetishized international cultures and packed their works with their influences. They were a generation that grew up in an open, increasingly cosmopolitan Japan newly filled with foreigners bringing all kinds of cultural influences with them that was previously closed off to the average Japanese citizen during and before the war. But then the 80s and 90s happened, and suddenly you're getting more and more people joining the animation industry specifically because they grew up as fans of anime that they watched on tv and in theaters. Guys like Kawamori and Anno exemplify this generation, who got their start wanting to make shows like the kinds they worshiped as children. They're still worldly and interested in the same things their heroes/seinors were, but their first and foremost desires is to simply make things like those other things they like, and filled with stuff *they* like, like tits and ass. And by the 00s, you've got an even newer wave of animators gaining traction and influence in the industry who grew up on anime as this unique Japanese expression, and focusing more and more inward towards insular and local experiences. Anime in the 00s begins being even more focused on Japanese settings, with mainly Japanese characters as its creators aim to become animators from the outset and only really are concerned with anime versus any other side hobbies or anything else. And I think that smaller noses is a reflection of that as the people creating and consuming anime became more and more insular, they looked at examples of beauty closer to home, so you start getting smaller and cuter noses. Nowadays, big noses on characters in anime/manga are almost exclusively reserved for visually coding foreigners. Which is its own kind of interesting to me. Because often that's used to other foreign characters in weird, exaggerated ways that aren't great and might be tinged in racism. But it's also amusing because it's very common for Western audiences to assume whiteness of Japanese characters, but on average shows these days will go out of its way to code its white characters as different with facial features like big noses compared to the implicit default Japaneseness of the rest of its cast.

This is all supposition on my part, as I lack the statistics and deep dive on primary sources to back these assertions up. But I bet this subject matter would make for a great doctoral thesis to anyone wanting to do some hardcore research on it. And it just feels like it's probably true given broad observations of trends and everything I've read on traditional cultural anthropology over the years on Japanese society. But ya. Noses! Interesting details!
 

Peklo

Oh! Create!
(they/them, she/her)
I meant a to-do watch list, yeah. I do a lot of "shopping" for things to watch, based on openings, key visuals, production staff--that kind of thing. Escaflowne landed on it years ago because it had a lot of striking qualities about it just on a at-a-glance basis.
 
So someone at Sony pressed the wrong button and Demon Slayer: Mugen Train was available for purchase and streaming on the Sony Video app on PS4/PS5 and Android overnight, instead of just being available for pre-order as intended. They've since corrected that oversight, but you can't really put something like that "back in the bottle" in this day and age. So if your so inclined, I'm sure you can now find it through some less than savory means.

As it stands, it wasn't supposed to be available until June 22nd; though maybe after this screw up Sony will just decide to release it digitally early to offset the inevitable piracy... Though I imagine that might hurt their box office take or cause contract issues with the theater chains currently screening it. Despite the current situation, the move has been record breaking for an anime film released in North America, something like $21 Million for the opening weekend, which put it just shy of being the number one film in North America behind the new Mortal Kombat.
 

q 3

Posts: 4,731,901
(they/them)
Red Garden (2006) was probably the last great Big Nose anime. Also the sole entry in the Feminist Gothic Horror Magical Girl genre.
 

Pajaro Pete

(He/Himbo)
oh yeah, i forgot why i came here: Netflix announced Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon Eternal The Movie's release date is June 3rd with this... bizarre trailer, like what kind of 90s ADV preshow ad roll on your $25 VHS tape music is this
 
Red Garden (2006) was probably the last great Big Nose anime.
That show looks pretty great. Not quite sure it fits 100% though. Seems like this show takes place in the US? And all the characters are American. Most of these big noses looks like they're specifically coded to point out how foreign these characters are, IMO versus just being a house style, because there's a LOT of variety in the shapes here.

like what kind of 90s ADV preshow ad roll on your $25 VHS tape music is this
lol I'm tellin' you guys, whoever runs the anime initiative at Netflix is mentally stuck in 1994.
 

Johnny Unusual

(He/Him)
Finally caught up with Vivy and I got to sing its praises again. I mean, I feel like what they are setting up to be a twist is kind of obvious but I feel like the show might be banking on your expectations on that front. Regardless, its a great little sci-fi adventure drama. It looks very beautiful at moments (particularly in close ups of the lead character's eyes, which they lean into at times) and I like that it is definitely not drawing too much out. Heck, one of the biggest moments happens in the last part of episode two and then they need to move on quick and there's so much to unpack from that, the show will definitely need to circle back in some capacity, if not literally, than emotionally.

Odd Taxi is also still really good and needs to be watched. It feels like the show has a big plan for how all these different stories will cross paths (and have begun to) but even if it drops the ball there, I am really into the stories as they are.
 
I watched the first two episodes of Vivy. It's fun so far, but I have apprehensions about it that I can't really describe or articulate. Then I had someone point out to me that the head writer was also the same guy who created Re:Zero, and all I could do to respond to that was to laugh nervously.
 

Johnny Unusual

(He/Him)
I'm only vaguely aware of Re:Zero but I'm not clueing into any problematic elements so far 5 eps in. Hopefully this will be like watching Kado: The Right Answer, a weird wonky show I liked and not Babylon, a show that was from the same writer that turned out to be horribly misogynistic and grotesque 4 episodes in.

EDIT: Fixed
 
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JBear

Internet's foremost Bertolli cosplayer
(He/Him)
I'm only vaguely aware of Re:Zero but I'm clueing into any problematic elements so far 5 eps in.
I'm assuming you missed a "not" there. Vivy has been fine. Good, even. Couldn't be further from RE:Zero in pretty much every way. If the MC suddenly wakes up next to two fetish maids or it swerves into misery porn then I'll be very surprised.
 
You did this, Wisteria.
 
Vivy has been fine. Good, even. Couldn't be further from RE:Zero in pretty much every way.
Two episodes in, it's fine. I wouldn't say 'further from in pretty much every way' though. There's a lot of the same DNA coursing through it. It's already overly reliant on violent shock value and throwing big twists at the viewer. And episode 2 ends with a stinger of murdering a little girl that Vivy formed an emotional bond with the prior episode. I want the show to be good, but I have my guard up and won't be letting it down anytime soon. I'll also pay good money and give favorable odds to the fact that this will end with either Vivy performing a heroic sacrifice to save the world in very sad pls be sad dramatics, and/or a time loop re-engaging and Vivy having to start this all over again one more time. Also, only real complaint so far is this stupid bear: why does he even need Vivy to begin with? He can hack any computer it seems, and can control giant fuck-you-machinery. Just hijack an army of bots and do what you need it to do instead of asking Vivy and then beating her up when she doesn't comply.
You did this, Wisteria.
I did do this! Oh, you meant you did it too. You won't regret it! Probably.
 

Mr Bean

Chief Detective
Man, you guys are realling making me want to dig out my old 90's set of Escaflone DVDs (all 8? of them).
 

Johnny Unusual

(He/Him)
Mars Red has a generic name and a generic premise (that doesn't match the name): Military creates a special team made only of vampires. Often I'm not into military-themed anime. Often, I'm not into vampire anime. But Mars Red is quite good. Its not quite the weird, mysterious tone the first episode had but it still feels a bit different than you might expect. There's a dry humour to it that I appreciate. There's a low key sadness that works better than the stereotypical mopey vampire fiction. The first two episodes "villains" are more sad than conventionally "mwa-ha-ha" evil (the first one isn't even really a "villain" as she escapes but doesn't actually bother to kill anyone and just shows up to die, leaving the protagonist more questions than answers. The show has recently set up two more conventional villains but despite this, it is a very interesting show with a cast I am into. There's only one "bad-ass" vampire in the crew and even he seems like a well-considered character. Its a show I'm very down with.

Shadows House is living up to the promise of the first episode. I think it could have easily been a show that romanticizes indentured servitude and that's not completely un-there but clearly there's something very wrong and scary in the title location that the main characters are told not to notice. I'm very interested into where the show is going from here.
 

clarice

bebadosamba
Recently i've watched Patlabor: New Files and the first two movies. New Files is great, the first movie is good, and the second... It is a weird choice to pick Patlabor to explore this subject matter, but it makes it even more effective for those who know the series before watching the movie, i think. It does not have the usual qualities of Patlabor, but it has the usual qualities of an Oshii film. Love the movie visually - it reflects the 'illusory peace' thing very well.
 

Tegan

dirtbag lesbian
(She/Her)
Grabbing a bunch of stuff lately but really gravitating to bubble-era OVAs; any recommendations? Just got Dragon Half, looking forward to its mildly pornographic antics.
 
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Johnny Unusual

(He/Him)
Read or Die! I think that might be post-bubble, but still, its very good.
For novelty, the Jojo OVA (and maybe Boah, if you want to be an Araki animation completist and see what his version of Guyver looks like, I think it actually came first)
I wouldn't call this a recommendation by any means but an acknowledgement of its existence, but they did do a Story of Ricky: Riki-Oh OVA.
 

Zef

Find Your Reason
(He/Him)
Grabbing a bunch of stuff lately but really gravitating to bubble-era OVAs; any recommendations?

Dirty Pair
Mermaid Forest
and Mermaid's Scar are both based on Takahashi's series, but they're from different animation studios. IIRC the former was licensed by Manga and the latter by Viz.
Speaking of Takahashi, Laughing Target.
Bubblegum Crisis
, maaaaaaybe Crash.
Gunbuster.
 

Kirin

Summon for hire
(he/him)
Seconding Read or Die, Dirty Pair, Bubblegum Crisis.

Also maybe Megazon 23. Or Vampire Princess Miyu? Otaku no Video?

And despite launching a million harem animes, the original OVAs of Tenchi Muyo and El Hazard are pretty nice to look at.
 

conchobhar

What's Shenmue?
(he/him/his)
Recently i've watched Patlabor: New Files and the first two movies. New Files is great, the first movie is good, and the second... It is a weird choice to pick Patlabor to explore this subject matter, but it makes it even more effective for those who know the series before watching the movie, i think. It does not have the usual qualities of Patlabor, but it has the usual qualities of an Oshii film. Love the movie visually - it reflects the 'illusory peace' thing very well.
The first movie is, in my opinion, the high-water mark of the franchise. I really like the way it raises the stakes— labors are going haywire! and it's jeopardizing the big development megaproject!— while still being incredibly mundane; even though it opens and closes on two big action scenes, the movie is mostly concerned with the investigation. And it's a very low-key one, even by series standards: there are no suspects and no real clues… it's just detectives following hunches and crunching numbers. And it still manages to make some incisive criticism about the whole bubble economy. It feels bigger than ever without ever losing sight of itself.

Patlabor 2 is a curious one. It's so far removed, tonally, from the rest of the franchise, which is both the best and worst thing about it. Best, because it subverts your expectations and comes out as this incredible tone poem with even more pointed criticism of the era, and even functions as melancholy send-off for the franchise as a whole. Worst, because all of that also makes it pretty disappointing as "a Patlabor story", especially how it's effectively a Gotoh solo outing. I'm never entirely sure exactly how I feel about it, but I do think it's a fascinating and excellent film in its own right.

Grabbing a bunch of stuff lately but really gravitating to bubble-era OVAs; any recommendations? Just got Dragon Half, looking forward to its mildly pornographic antics.
Hey, while I'm on the subject, check out Mobile Police Patlabor (sometimes known as Patlabor: The Early Days).
 
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