• Welcome to Talking Time's third iteration! If you would like to register for an account, or have already registered but have not yet been confirmed, please read the following:

    1. The CAPTCHA key's answer is "Percy"
    2. Once you've completed the registration process please email us from the email you used for registration at percyreghelper@gmail.com and include the username you used for registration

    Once you have completed these steps, Moderation Staff will be able to get your account approved.

  • TT staff acknowledge that there is a backlog of new accounts that await confirmation.

    Unfortunately, we are putting new registrations on hold for a short time.

    We do not expect this delay to extend beyond the first of November 2020, and we ask you for your patience in this matter.

    ~TT Moderation Staff

Iaboo, Youaboo, Weallaboo for Anime!

Johnny Unusual

(He/Him)
Yeah, episode three feels more like the show decided to become an anthology where the lead character gets kind of involved, but doesn't go out of her way to help people. In the first episode she's a plucky protagonist. Now she's aloof and just watching people get fucked. Non-literally.
 

Hilene

Loves "Friendly Girls"
(She/Her)
The first volume of the LN is basically her telling other peoples' stories. The ones where she becomes a participant are ones where the local people involved drag her into it. For example, the one with the girl looking to pass her test forces Elaina into her story through thievery. There's a couple of ones like this through the LN, but mostly it's about her just recording stories from around the world.

I feel like the LN sets itself up as an anthology series a lot cleaner. I still gotta read the second volume and see if that's what it plans (and also to see if the lesbian comes back; the first volume basically bookends with her, with the first story in the book being the one about Elaina teaching her, and the last story in the book having that scene from the end of the episode where Elaina is reading a newspaper and sees that the girl has passed the test).
 

Tegan

dirtbag lesbian
(She/Her)
I watched They Were 11, a 1986 anime film based on a Moto Hagio manga. It's a sci-fi drama about a group of eleven strangers tasked with a test to get into a prestigious academy: survive aboard a derelict spacecraft for 53 days. Upon arrival, they discover that a saboteur has infiltrated their original group of ten. Everyone aboard becomes more and more paranoid as problems pile up and the strangers begin to reveal their secrets.

The moments where it dips its toes into hard sci-fi are really neat; one crew member casually tosses out that his planet is on a 48-year orbit of their sun, so pretty much everybody lives through just a single cycle of the seasons. The ship also uses organic electrical wiring thanks to a creeper plant whose composition is mostly copper. There's some good spooky ambience since it's not initially clear what this ship is or why it's abandoned, and there are items onboard that nobody quite understands.

It's kinda heteronormative; there's an entire subplot about Frol, a crew member whose race begins life as intersex beings that are divided into men and women based on social status and, rarely, exceptional merit. Frol is taking the test to prove themself and be allowed to become a man, as women are less than second-class citizens in their heavily patriarchal society.. In the end they pass the test but become a woman anyway so that they can marry the male main character. It could be a lot worse, given the time, but it's not exactly ideal. It at least doesn't seem to judge the character for their identity.

I rate it a "Pretty Good" out of 10.
 

JBear

Internet's foremost Bertolli cosplayer
(He/Him)
I find it endlessly amusing that the big baddie in Dragon Quest: The Adventure of Dai has the same name as my ex-wife.

Lord of Darkness indeed.
 

Johnny Unusual

(He/Him)
*Bites tongue in regards in naming developments down the line*

I've been finding this a pretty strong anime season. Man, Golden Kamuy is still super good. The most recent episode perfectly encapsulated why Tsurumi is one of my all time favourite villains AND has a callback to one of my all time favourite GK bits. This show is fucking great.

Meanwhile Talentless Nana and Akudama Drive take shows that could have easily been "edgy" and are just fun rip-roaring yarns (though the ED of the latter implies the weight of what's going on is probably going to hit near the end of the show's run).

I was a bit lukewarm on Moriarty the Patriot but while it doesn't quite hit the sweet spot with the detective stuff in episode two, it does look like it has more of an overt and not-at-all subtle mission statement and I'm sort of in it for it being like an inverse version of the first couple of Jojo episodes, with a brilliant orphan infiltrating a shitty rich family.

Reminder: Olympia Kyklos is still happening, is short and is worth your time.
 

Johnny Unusual

(He/Him)
I'm never good at these things but in the last year JBear's been noticing this guy's voice everywhere in the last year. "Oh, its that guy" he keeps saying.

In unrelated news, Netflix will be streaming the first four Thus Spoke Kishibe Rohan specials in Spring, which makes me think that's likely when it will also have Diamond is unbreakable.

One thing I noticed on rewatching Jojo this time is the ridiculous analogies everyone makes, even from characters you don't think will make them. Like, you expect Josuke to say things like "Ah, its like putting on a pair of new underwear on New Year's Day." But I forgot some of DIO's gems...


EDIT: Way of the Househusband is getting a lot of attention but Netflix is also making a "Roman Bathhouse Comedy" from the creator of Olympia Kyklos so... I'm excited.
 
Last edited:

Kirin

Summon for hire
(he/him)
Moved over from the Netflix thread in reference to the House Husband news, then going off into other anime:

Nice. My schedule's different these days so I"ll probably just wait 'til it officially comes out on US Netflix. And yeah, the Tsuda casting is fantastic.

Meanwhile I'm just finally getting started on The Great Pretender. Since we've been watching stuff in the evenings when she's sleepy and doesn't have a lot of concentration, she prefers going with dubs, so I got to see how that plays out... turns out they just kept the JP track with multiple languages going on for the introductory scenes (no doubt confusing a lot of people as to whether they'd actually selected the dub version) before switching to the new English track at the point where the original goes full-Japanese. It works pretty well, and at two eps in the dub ain't bad so far.

In other news apparently everything is the 90s again because Tokyo Babylon 2021 is a thing that's happened. Out of left field, but okay. Seeing modern generic redesigns of classic CLAMP characters is just kinda weird though.
 
turns out they just kept the JP track with multiple languages going on for the introductory scenes (no doubt confusing a lot of people as to whether they'd actually selected the dub version) before switching to the new English track at the point where the original goes full-Japanese.
That's pretty novel and neat. But why do I get the sense that it was a poorly planned out decision? (Oh right, Netflix's incompetence.) The entire last arc of the show (9 episodes) takes place in Japan. Are they just not going to dub the whole final act to keep consistency? And despite how much I like the idea personally, that's not why people who watch dubs go to dubs. If I pick dubs because I don't want to read a bunch of text, why would you make me read a bunch of subtitles anyways? Why is Netflix so bad at their jobs? Why do they hate anime?
 

Rascally Badger

El Capitan de la outro espacio
(He/Him)
They only did that with the English dub, because it confused me and I switched to other dub languages to see if they worked, and they did. Then I watched about 2 more minutes and it became clear what they were doing.
 

conchobhar

What's Shenmue?
(he/him/his)
That's pretty novel and neat. But why do I get the sense that it was a poorly planned out decision? (Oh right, Netflix's incompetence.) The entire last arc of the show (9 episodes) takes place in Japan. Are they just not going to dub the whole final act to keep consistency? And despite how much I like the idea personally, that's not why people who watch dubs go to dubs. If I pick dubs because I don't want to read a bunch of text, why would you make me read a bunch of subtitles anyways? Why is Netflix so bad at their jobs? Why do they hate anime?
It's not a constant thing; after 10 minutes or so, a card pops up reading something to the extent of "from now on the series will be presented entirely in English", and true to that, the rest of the episode and all subsequent ones are performed entirely by the dub cast. The multilingual opening is just done to establish the premise and setting, that this is an international cast of characters who speak different languages, and provide context for when characters can and can't understand each other. It's not far removed from how The Hunt for Red October opens with the Soviet characters speaking Russian before switching to English.
 
Last edited:
Top