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Same Name, Different Game and other YouTube shows from me

Phantoon

I cuss you bad
It's a really good video! It's weird, here in England I don't remember Twisted Metal being a Thing, it seemed to be more Wipeout.
 
There was only one kid in my social circles that was into Twisted Metal growing up but he was *way* into Twisted Metal.
 

Falselogic

Techno-Threadcromancer
(they/them)
I remember playing this a lot with my older brother and younger sister, the PSX original. I never followed up with any of the sequels though.
 

ASandoval

Old Man Gamer
(he/him)
I didn't get a PSX until 1998 but I remember Twisted Metal being one of those mind blowing games I'd play over and over again at the Kay Bee Toys kiosk that, along with (of all things) Parappa The Rapper, really sold the system as being nothing like anything that had come before it.
 

fanboymaster

(He/Him)
Good video, I won't lie I think TM was and is bad and have thought that since playing 2 with my bro at the time, but I can't deny the historical importance and this is a good even keel look at the beginning and end of the franchise. Always good to hear Sewart and the RetroPals voices too.
 

ShakeWell

Slam Master
(he, etc.)
It's a really good video! It's weird, here in England I don't remember Twisted Metal being a Thing, it seemed to be more Wipeout.
Wipeout was the home-grown franchise!

I remember playing this a lot with my older brother and younger sister, the PSX original. I never followed up with any of the sequels though.
2, Black, Head-On, and 2012 are all better than the original! I recommend them!

I didn't get a PSX until 1998 but I remember Twisted Metal being one of those mind blowing games I'd play over and over again at the Kay Bee Toys kiosk that, along with (of all things) Parappa The Rapper, really sold the system as being nothing like anything that had come before it.
That definitely tracks.

Always good to hear Sewart and the RetroPals voices too.
I was very glad they agreed to do it!
 

Phantoon

I cuss you bad
Wipeout was the home-grown franchise!
I think it was perfectly of its time; if you were into clubbing the soundtrack was incredible, it had some of the best tracks of the time. The Designers Republic were hugely influential back then in graphic design and the game wasn't half bad either. I think it tied into the zeitgeist like few games before or since.

Possibly why it lost its audience quite hard, being so of its time it became a relic.

Edit: that's something I forget when thinking about old games. They were a part of the culture of the time, and playing them outside of that loses some of the context and impact. X-Men: Children of the Atom is incredible, but seeing that while Age of Apocalypse is a thing is something else.
 
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fanboymaster

(He/Him)
TM's pretty much in the same boat I think, it's a very very 90s franchise with a very American white teenage to twenty something male appeal and it's kind of hard to reimagine it in a way that's still mass market nowadays that isn't also essentially a total aesthetic and mechanical teardown.
 

Kishi

Little Waves
(They/Them)
Staff member
Moderator
Edit: that's something I forget when thinking about old games. They were a part of the culture of the time, and playing them outside of that loses some of the context and impact. X-Men: Children of the Atom is incredible, but seeing that while Age of Apocalypse is a thing is something else.
Absolutely. In a similar vein, any time I set out to experience a series of media that's new to me, I go in release order whenever possible. That way, you can at least understand the context of each work's place within that particular history and how it built upon what came before.

"A little history" is generally my favorite part of Shake's videos, too.
 

ShakeWell

Slam Master
(he, etc.)
I think it was perfectly of its time; if you were into clubbing the soundtrack was incredible, it had some of the best tracks of the time. The Designers Republic were hugely influential back then in graphic design and the game wasn't half bad either. I think it tied into the zeitgeist like few games before or since.

Possibly why it lost its audience quite hard, being so of its time it became a relic.
Its inclusion in the club scene of Hackers is really all that you need to point to in order to indicate just how much of a product of its time it was.

TM's pretty much in the same boat I think, it's a very very 90s franchise with a very American white teenage to twenty something male appeal and it's kind of hard to reimagine it in a way that's still mass market nowadays that isn't also essentially a total aesthetic and mechanical teardown.
Isn't that still the demographic the big publishers are going after these days, anyways?

"A little history" is generally my favorite part of Shake's videos, too.
Aw, thanks, Kishi!
 

fanboymaster

(He/Him)
They've moved to try to capture the 20s-40 demo with regretful dads or dad adjacents. In your face 90s-early 00s edginess honestly might have difficulty maintaining the same appeal it did to the current generation or at least that feels like what would kill revival talks in any given meeting.
 

YangusKhan

does the Underpants Dance
(He/Him/His)
Its inclusion in the club scene of Hackers is really all that you need to point to in order to indicate just how much of a product of its time it was.
Oh my god, that's what that game is in Hackers?? All this time I've been watching that movie and kind of assumed it was some forgotten thing or a fake game that didn't actually exist. I'm a fake Hackers fan.
 

ShakeWell

Slam Master
(he, etc.)
They've moved to try to capture the 20s-40 demo with regretful dads or dad adjacents. In your face 90s-early 00s edginess honestly might have difficulty maintaining the same appeal it did to the current generation or at least that feels like what would kill revival talks in any given meeting.
Just make Sweet Tooth a sad dad.

Oh my god, that's what that game is in Hackers?? All this time I've been watching that movie and kind of assumed it was some forgotten thing or a fake game that didn't actually exist. I'm a fake Hackers fan.
It sure is. I mean, clearly it's beyond the original PS1 version, Psygnosis did something here, but it's SUPPOSED to be Wipeout.

Great video Joe! I'm also a fan of "a little history" :)
Thank you!
 

Phantoon

I cuss you bad
It sure is. I mean, clearly it's beyond the original PS1 version, Psygnosis did something here, but it's SUPPOSED to be Wipeout.
Wikipedia says: "A beta version of Wipeout appeared in the cult film Hackers, in which the game was being played by the protagonists in a nightclub. The game's appearance in the film led to Sony purchasing the studio in the following months after its release."

Citation needed but that's fascinating
 

jpfriction

You'll never take my hat away
I remember playing this a lot with my older brother and younger sister, the PSX original. I never followed up with any of the sequels though.
Yeah 2 was my jam in high school. I’d play shadow and my neighbor would play specter, probably played through it 50 times over the years and we still throw it on any time we are in the same town. Can’t see the proper ending that way but couch co-op is so good in these games.
 

Phantoon

I cuss you bad
Nice video, @ShakeWell! Bushido Blade is a truly unique game, and really intense. SmackDown is another good choice, I was a big wrestling fan back then and the game crystallises the feel of the era really well. I need to check out the other ones...
 

ShakeWell

Slam Master
(he, etc.)
Nice video, @ShakeWell! Bushido Blade is a truly unique game, and really intense. SmackDown is another good choice, I was a big wrestling fan back then and the game crystallises the feel of the era really well. I need to check out the other ones...
Thank you! And, oh, yeah, I should probably post that here, huh?

 

WildcatJF

I will not be stopping
(he / his / him)
I got hype yo

This was excellent Joe! Appreciate all of the context behind Namco's involvement with Sony and seeing how big a deal Tekken 3 was back then. I never quite clicked with Tekken but I feel I should give this one a try if I come across the PS1 disc somewhere.
 

Falselogic

Techno-Threadcromancer
(they/them)
I love Legacy of Kain! I found that first game enthralling and it sold me on the franchise for a long time.

I also felt like the only person I knew who was playing it. It felt like a hidden gem I had found, at the time.
 

R.R. Bigman

Coolest Guy
My older brother and I played Blood Omen for about as long as it took to killed by a bunch of guys outside a tavern or some other kind of building. We had a lot more fun with Soul Reaver, with it's Zelda/Tomb Raider exploration and puzzles combined with the very-good-for-the -time voice acting and writing. It would be cool to see some sort of Re-master of those games, as we only played the first SR and I've wondered over the years where the story went after the giant To Be Continued.
 

Kishi

Little Waves
(They/Them)
Staff member
Moderator
Worth watching just for an underlit Roger rising from the bottom of the frame and uttering the blood. Please tell him he is in fact my favorite video game-playing blue puppet.

I bet that colored lighting in the dungeons was pretty neato in '96.
 
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