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What'cha Reading?

Finished the Babel series, so I feel accomplished. Now reading Krampus: The Yule Lord by Brom. The guy's been 2 for 2 so far (The Child Thief, Lost Gods)
 
Now reading Krampus: The Yule Lord by Brom. The guy's been 2 for 2 so far (The Child Thief, Lost Gods)
It ended up being my least favorite, but still solid. I'm going to try to catch his newest one some time next year. Moving on to Chasing the Boogeyman by Richard Chizmar
 

lincolnic

can stop, will stop
(he/him)
Finally started Mel Brooks' autobiography All About Me! last night, pleased to report Mel Brooks remains a treasure.
 
The Mel Brooks was fantastic, my favorite nonfiction of the year, easily. Done with new books for the year, and getting a start on my Wheel of Time read through project for 2022, and going all the way back to the beginning with The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan (this will be my third time reading this)
 

lincolnic

can stop, will stop
(he/him)
The Mel Brooks was fantastic, my favorite nonfiction of the year, easily.
Agreed!

I've also started rereading Rendezvous with Rama after it was mentioned upthread, and so far it's very enjoyable. Every so often I need a reminder of how much I like Arthur C. Clarke.
 

Falselogic

Techno-Threadcromancer
(they/them)
Water Log by Roger Deakin is this beautiful simple book of the writer describing his outdoor swims across Great Britain. Whether it's among the islands of the Hebrides, the coast of Sussex or some nameless canal. It's really quite a lovely book.
 
Quality wise, this has been my best year, ever so slightly a bit more than last year. As to amount, last year was the best with 174 things. If I finish EOTW, I'll have read 172 things this year
 
I guess I'll share my favorites from the year:

Graphic novels
3. Spider-Man: Life Story
2. Saga
1. Invincible

Non-fiction
5. The Bradbury Chronicles
4. The Storyteller
3. VJ
2. The Star Wars Archives
1. All About Me!

Fiction
5. Foundation
4. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
3. This Tender Land
2. Guns of the Dawn
1. Sea of Rust
 

Rosewood

The metal babble flees!
(she/her)
A tweet thread for a reading overview is a fun idea! And with only 3x books it will not take long. (pondering)
 

Rosewood

The metal babble flees!
(she/her)
My favorites of the year were:

Fiction

Network Effect by Martha Wells
The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

Non-fiction

I read a handful but there wasn't anything that was favorite-worthy.

Audiobook

The Best of All Possible Worlds by Karen Lord, narr. Robin Miles
The Fellowship of the Ring by JRR Tolkien, narr. Rob Inglis

Graphic novel (manga)
I'm rotating through something like 30 series (easily bored). This is basically junk reading for me but these are the ones that stood out from the rest.

Natsume's Book of Friends v. 1-3
What Did You Eat Yesterday? v. 1-2
Girls' Last Tour v. 5-6 (end)
xxxHOLIC v. 10-12
 
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Violentvixen

(She/Her)
I'm rotating through something like 30 series (easily bored). This is basically junk reading for me but these are the ones that stood out from the rest.
What Did You Eat Yesterday? v. 1-2

I often forget to track graphic novels I've read but all three issues of What Did You Eat Yesterday that came out this year are great.

Here's everything I rated five stars on Goodreads this year, I recommend them all:

Maria Headley's translation of Beowulf
The Midnight Library by Matt Haig
When the Tiger Came Down the Mountain by Nghi Vo
The Other Madisons by Bettye Kearse
Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro
Remote Control by Nnedi Okorafor
A Swim in a Pond in the Rain by George Saunders
Fun Home by Alison Bechdel
First Person Singular by Haruki Murakami
Broken by Jenny Lawson
Hidden Valley Road by Robert Kolker
So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo
The Exeter Book Riddles
The Perfect Nine by Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
Today a Woman Went Mad in the Supermarket by Helma Wolitzer
A Carnival of Snackery by David Sedaris
Never Saw Me Coming by Vera Kurian
Gastro Obsura by Cecily Wong
 

zonetrope

(he/him)
I read some really good stuff this year, but Liu Cixin's Remembrance of Earth's Past trilogy stood out as one of those wonderful "I didn't even know fiction could be like this" experiences that only come along every so often.
 

ThornGhost

lofi posts to relax/study to
(he/him)
A while back I picked up a haul of Haruki Murakami books at a used book store that were in great condition and very cheap. Every now and then I'll pick one up and read it. I kept clumping them all back up together on my bookshelf and now I have no idea which ones I've read. Some are unique enough that I of course remember (Wind Up Bird, Hardboiled Wonderland, Kafka, etc) but others are just so similar in broad strokes I never know. "Oh, this is the dreamlike one with the lonely young man wandering around thinking about a woman that disappeared?"

Anyway, I'm reading Norwegian Wood for what may be the first or third time, I have no idea.
 

Octopus Prime

Mysterious Contraption
(He/Him)
Finished off The Faceless Old Woman Who Secretly Lives In Your House, which if you're in the mood for Additional Night Vale, will probably disappoint you; outside of a few injokes and references, there's barely a mention of the main series at all until the very end of the story. Instead it's entirely a history of the strangest characters in the series which is also almost entirely pretty underwhelmingly average; for a given value of "average" since it still involves being a member of a clandestine pirate illuminati and usurping a foreign power.

It was fine for what it was, but what it was is not what I was hoping to receive.
 

Falselogic

Techno-Threadcromancer
(they/them)
I knew it was coming but that doesn't seem to have helped. I still cried a little when I finished Where the Red Fern Grows. #OldDan #LittleAnn
 

Rosewood

The metal babble flees!
(she/her)
I DNFed Where the Red Fern Grows when I was about 11 because of the scene where
the kid falls on the axe
. To this day I can't handle body horror.
 

Violentvixen

(She/Her)
The Inheritance of Orquidea Divina is absolutely stunning. I guess I'd call it magical realism but a bit more grounded and focused than others in the genre. Highly, highly recommended. My husband tried to make me stop reading it since it was way past bedtime and I growled at him because I was so close to finishing it. Worth being tired today.
 
Along with finishing the Wheel of Time, I will be attempting to read one completed trilogy per month, and to start off, I have selected the Powder Mage Trilogy by Brian McClellan
 

Violentvixen

(She/Her)
I just finished the graphic novel Himawari House and really liked it. It's about three non-Japanese girls living in Japan for a year. Mainly focuses on the girl who was born in Japan but grew up in America but all their stories are really well done. Highly recommend this one.

The author also did George Takei's They Called Us Enemy which really should be read by every American. It's amazing how much people don't know about the camps.
 

shivam

commander damage
(he/hiim)
Currently reading The Poison Squad, about the battle to create the food and drug administration and stop adulteration of food, and let me tell you, it is not great meal time reading, lol
 

Violentvixen

(She/Her)
Currently reading The Poison Squad, about the battle to create the food and drug administration and stop adulteration of food, and let me tell you, it is not great meal time reading, lol
Oh nice I didn't know about this book. People don't realize what a huge deal the Pure Food Act was. Wiley also had a big part in the cocaine/Coca-cola stuff a little later on. This is going on my list, glad you mentioned it!

The Jungle is probably the more well-known driver of making US food less deadly but isn't as based in science and pushes more of the social aspects. It's likely even less of a good meal time read as it was written to shock people into action. But damn did it work.
 
Done with the Powder Mage trilogy, I'll definitely give the follow up series a try some day. Now reading, Here We Go Again: My Life in Television by Betty White
 
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