• Welcome to Talking Time's third iteration! If you would like to register for an account, or have already registered but have not yet been confirmed, please read the following:

    1. The CAPTCHA key's answer is "Percy"
    2. Once you've completed the registration process please email us from the email you used for registration at percyreghelper@gmail.com and include the username you used for registration

    Once you have completed these steps, Moderation Staff will be able to get your account approved.

  • TT staff acknowledge that there is a backlog of new accounts that await confirmation.

    Unfortunately, we are putting new registrations on hold for a short time.

    We do not expect this delay to extend beyond the first of November 2020, and we ask you for your patience in this matter.

    ~TT Moderation Staff

Videogames for Girls

gogglebob

The Goggles Do Nothing
(he/him)
Okay, all videogames are for all sorts of people, not a debate there. What prompted this thread was a discussion with a friend about old Disney Channel shows, and how there have been a few intermittent games back in the day based on the likes of Lizzie McGuire, Kim Possible, and Hannah Montana. While, again, gender politics are weird, these are definitely shows that were aimed at the "young girl" demographic, and they did get tie-in games on Gameboy Advance, Playstation 2, and PSP. Aaaand, aside from Barbie titles, that's like, all I can think of for games tied into distinct "girl" properties. A handful of, what, early 21st century games that probably only ever existed thanks to some random Disney initiative to compete with that N64 Powerpuff Girls game.

What I'm getting at is that I want a beat 'em up starring Netflix She-Ra. But I very much doubt such a thing was ever even considered...

Anyway, am I missing, like, a glut of "girl show"-based videogames? Even the mentioned games seem to barely warrant wikipedia entries. Is this all because Mary Kate and Ashley Olsen ruined the market for "girl media"? There are definitely videogames that seem to be aimed at this same market, but my recall tells me they are generally not licensed. Are we ever going to see a Star vs. The Forces of Evil title to match Steven Universe's trilogy? What's out there?
 

ASandoval

Old Man Gamer
(he/him)
There's a lot to unpack with this topic that I'm not fully equipped to do, but I'll contribute by pointing you toward the FEMICOM museum, a database aimed to curate games and game accessories that are aimed at young girls. It's not updated all that often, but the information that's already there, including a thorough look at the Casio Loopy, is all interesting and vital information.
 

Peklo

Oh! Create!
(they/them, she/her)
The first place to look would probably be visual novels, in the otome subgenre as the targeted demographic is literally in the terminology. I've long been dissatisfied with Angelique in particular being so totally inaccessible and unknown in English despite its massive popularity and historical importance to the medium, with the circumstances of its creation in being by women for women, about a woman's POV.

The recently fan translated Dreamcast game Napple Tale: Arsia in Daydream is another one where that kind of creative ethos and presentation is clear to see in women being in charge and making what they wanted to make.

I would consider Style Savvy to be another one in this category, even if it's played more widely than some others thanks to Nintendo's publishing assistance. I've certainly read more than my share of "now don't get me wrong, I'm a totally buff and tough guy despite playing this game for girls that's beneath my notice" laborious professional reviews about them, written by men with shitty attitudes.

There's a 3DS game by the name of Moco Moco Friends that's also pure magical girl media, and I doubt very many played or noticed it. I wrote about it a few years ago and that piece is somewhere in the archives in a thread I don't recall, so I'll paste it below under the pop.


Racjin is a less publicized game developer at least in Western discourse, but one with a nonetheless storied past in creating games like Wizardry: Tale of the Forsaken Land, the excellent SaGa 2 and 3 DS remakes, and Final Fantasy Explorers. Into this milieu bursts Moco Moco Friends, a 2015 3DS RPG that released late in the year in North America and early in the next in Europe, courtesy of Aksys Games. That it was localized at all is notable in light of its inherent nature: it's an RPG aimed at young children, and girls in particular.


You, the person reading this, likely does not need to be told to know that media catering to the interests and tastes of girls and women is habitually underserved, devalued and dismissed at a societal base level, and especially when dealing with video games. It's something that's perceptible to anyone interacting with the field for a given length of time, and the only difference is in how long it takes one to become cognizant of it, usually determined by whether or not you're personally affected or targeted by the relevant aspects of the culture that surrounds us. Within video games, certain sectors or genres are further built into totemic fortresses of gender essentialism, meant to prop up the perceived majority in exclusionary ways and barring entry from those that are dictated not to belong. RPGs, for any number of reasons, can be broadly read this way in how they present and cater themselves, and that's part of the reason why Moco Moco Friends is so remarkable for what it is: it presents a genuine example of the genre for beginning players while unabashedly creating a distinct RPG for girls wrapped in candy colours, plushies and friendship. A game with this set of traits is rare; one that's not based on any sort of pre-existing license is practically unheard of.


Moco Moco Friends is the story of the titular Moco, a young witch freshly graduated from school, and her misadventures in honing her talents and seeking to become a Plushkin Master, a status achieved only by those who meet and befriend as many of the cute Plushkin creatures as possible inhabiting the world. You don't catch them, coerce them, imprison them... but befriend them. Monster catching and training games always have an element of subjugation to their mechanical expression, and while battles against Plushkin are a factor in Moco Moco Friends, their narrative contextualization is about the gentlest it could be, with Moco effectively healing ill Plushkin through contact with her overpowering kindness and being approached in turn by them, seeking further affection. Monster taming narratives have explored themes from dystopic near-futures to lighthearted fantasy to folk tales and digital information, and here the primary influence is in the wider tradition of magical girl genre stories, where friendship is the most powerful force in the world and empathy the strongest weapon to use against one's opponent. The threats to Moco, her friends and even her foes aren't physical violence and death, but insecurities, alienation and loneliness, and that's what everyone bands together to combat. They will weaponize their true friendship.


This sense of awareness for others and their needs extends to the game's overall design as well. As a game that's meant to be an introduction to a complicated and intimidating genre, Moco Moco Friends does an admirable job of simplifying the convoluted while retaining nuance under the surface. The game's sole town occupies a single screen with clearly delineated and communicated essential services in view, with an optional but beneficial ancillary garden environment attached to the main plaza where one can spend time growing helpful flora. The rest of the time is spent in various dungeon locales, with compact and easy to follow layouts, never deviating from their structure. Combat similarly is intuitively packaged with an appealing interface and a system that prioritizes situational use of abilities drawing from Moco's gradually regenerating magic point pool instead of the attrition of MP recovery usually found in turn-based affairs like this. Even the Plushkin themselves, despite possessing unique traits, elemental affinities and skills, have been balanced such that almost anything works for a given team, freeing the player from analysis paralysis and allowing them to spend time with the ones they think are the cutest, coolest, crudest or any other personal metric one can conjure up.


While older players will likely chafe against at least some aspects of the mechanical design in Moco Moco Friends, aesthetically the game is a fantastic treat. Every environment achieves a blazingly vibrant, rounded and colourful look that remains compelling even as the layouts stay unchanging--so much so that notorious glutton Moco daydreams of devouring the dungeon whole at times. Moco herself and all her friends benefit from a similarly strong visual design, with much communicated about their characters through colour-coding and clothing design alone. The Plushkins themselves aren't just nominally granted such a moniker, as they're beings of cloth, fabric, buttons, seams, adornments and accessories from the smallest to the largest, and despite the large number of palette swaps and minimally changed evolutionary forms, always remain a delight to encounter (it's extremely distressing to see an injured Plushkin start to visibly unravel and have their stuffing pour out of their frame; it is conversely an immense relief to see them patched up as Moco works her magic on them). The music also stunned me with how absolutely great it turned out to be, making the most of the modest scale of the game with nearly every major theme being irreverently bouncy, positive and infectious. Some favourites: Fort Pastel, Crystal Fort, Pyramaze, Battle Theme. No one could infer Moco Moco Friends to have been created with a sizable budget or team from everything the game presents, but within its own context what it offers is thoughtful and made with great care.


Upon reflecting on Moco Moco Friends, I see a game that "objectively" does not rate compared to many of its peers, but that's not the kind of criticism or media reading I care about, and so I consequently do value it very highly. It's a game that occupies a space in a field that in so many ways would not have it exist or exist in the specific ways that it does, and it is absolutely unapologetic about what it is because media for girls about girls is never something that one should be shamed or made feel lesser for. Here's to Moco and friends, then.

 

Phantoon

I cuss you bad
Yeah, was going to mention Style Savvy. Not exactly what you asked for, but an apparently excellent game. Does Animal Crossing count? It's a series which certainly appeals to women and its director is a woman?
 

q 3

Posts: 4,731,901
(they/them)
Some of the recent licensed games for "girl" franchises just don't make it out of Japan, perhaps because the underlying franchises generally don't make it over either, like Precure or PriPara. The latter even have the same developer as Style Savvy.
 

Mr. Sensible

Pitch and Putt Duffer
There's dozens of Nancy Drew PC point-and-click adventure games from the last twenty-odd years that were all squarely marketed towards young girls. Abby Russell (formerly of Giant Bomb) livestreamed full playthroughs of several of them.
 

gogglebob

The Goggles Do Nothing
(he/him)
For the record, Nancy Drew PC and that FEMICOM site are kind of exactly what I was thinking of for this thread. "Girls" have a lot of TV(/whatever media we consider to be "TV" today), books, and movies aimed squarely at their demographic, but very little of it seems to migrate to videogames (which can easily be contrasted with the "boy"'s high conversion rate). Regardless, I am happy to hear about the games that are exclusively games, but are more aimed at that demo. I would also add the Hatsune Miku franchise to that list, as it seems like a lot of stuff in the more "plot" based games (titles that are not just "pick a song") is aimed squarely at "girls", like the interaction scenes and the ability to dress up and decorate living spaces. Also, in hanging out in nerd spaces for the last decade, I've seen a lot of young women cosplaying Hatsune Miku.

(Vaguely related: the coolest thing I ever saw was over ten years ago, when an elementary school dance competition was happening at the local convention center, and I was working at a store a block over. It was a generally "mundane" event, with a number of typical ballerinas and alike coming through. Then, two competitors that could not have been more than 12 came in and were wearing the "dancer dress sphere" outfits of Yuna and Rikku. They were goddamned perfect. Whatever was going on at that dance competition, I hope they won.)

And, once again, not to sound like an alien, but I keep saying "girls" to differentiate from real people with real, eclectic tastes. I am distinctly thinking of "women of a certain age group that are targeted by marketing in a specific way" here.
 

Tegan

dirtbag lesbian
(She/Her)
I'm sure this is still the case and I just don't know about it, but all of my Game Boy deep dives have unearthed a glut of video game adaptations of girls' anime from the nineties and Y2K era: Sailor Moon, Card Captor Sakura, Hello Kitty, Hamtaro, etc. Most of them are extremely bad (other than the Hamtaro games, which fuckin' slap), but there sure are a lot of them!

One real big problem with media (especially toys, which kind of go hand-in-hand with kids' games) meant for girls is that if it's good enough that boys start to like it too, then it usually gets retooled to make boys like it more. Sometimes this is fine (Goosebumps), sometimes it is not (My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic), with the latter usually falling into the trap of trying to remove the thing that made audiences like it in the first place. Conversely, if girls start to like a thing that was originally intended for boys, then they tend to get a separate "girl" version to try to draw them away from the main thing so that little boys don't feel emasculated for liking the same thing that icky girls like (She-Ra started as exactly this). The absolute worst, though, is the slow trend of things starting out with broad appeal before starting to narrow in on boys, then making the girl spin-off when they remember that girls still like the thing (Lego Friends is the most prominent example, but Pokémon is starting to trend toward this, Let's Go Eevee in particular is pretty clearly supposed to be the "girl" version).

Turns out, video games for girls are crap because the gender split in media and toys is also crap!
 

gogglebob

The Goggles Do Nothing
(he/him)
Let's Go Eevee in particular is pretty clearly supposed to be the "girl" version

Can you elaborate on this? I got my official "You played Let's Go Eevee too long" diploma, but I didn't notice how it was any more gendered than Red/Blue.



I have no doubt what you're saying is accurate, just curious what I missed.
 

Tegan

dirtbag lesbian
(She/Her)
The marketing surrounding Eevee has gradually shifted toward making it a slightly cutesier secondary mascot for Pokémon, and all of the Let's Go promotional material makes explicit what was merely implicit before:





Pikachu is almost always pictured with the boy character, while Eevee is almost always pictured with the girl. Eevee also gets both more and overall arguably more adorable dressup options than Pikachu does, with the official artwork again presenting Eevee as the more "feminine" option



Eevee gets flowers! Pikachu gets a camo t-shirt.
 

Peklo

Oh! Create!
(they/them, she/her)
If we're talking Sailor Moon...

Probably the biggest touchstone for video game adaptations of the license is 1995's Bishōjo Senshi Sailor Moon: Another Story, a Super Famicom RPG that's been long since fan translated, and then retranslated in later years--a testament to the sustained interested and appreciation for it.

Years before Arc System Works became a known name in the industry, they already had a long development history and particularly in the field of Sailor Moon video games; the one to highlight is 1994's Bishōjo Senshi Sailor Moon S: Jōgai Rantō!? Shuyaku Sōdatsusen, a fighting game for the Super Famicom. This is something that occasionally turns up now when ArcSys have become so codified as purveyors of "anime" fighters thanks to decades of Guilty Gear and especially their last decade of hits with licensed properties that people salivate at the possibility of whatever franchise of their preference being given the honours--and sometimes Sailor Moon is remembered in that context. The irony is that it already happened under nominally the same developer, a long time ago. One cannot claim that this game is forgotten about either, as it's actually experienced a huge competitive resurgence and critical reassessment in recent years; it has been reclaimed by the community that originally shunned it or likely just wasn't aware it even existed.

A personal favourite is 1995's Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon for the arcades, developed by Gazelle, a developer that isn't really known for much since their original output consisted of three games. As ex-Toaplan folks, they continued making shooters, and after Gazelle's closure, continued making them at companies like Raizing and Cave, but they also participated in contributing to another arcade staple on the downturn with this beat 'em up. It wasn't the first Sailor Moon game in the genre, but it would be the lone one developed for the genre's native context, and I think speaks to the property's gargantuan crossover appeal in that it was "allowed" to fit into the ecosystem of what's a very gendered environment and genre. As a representative example of the kind of game it is, it's also utterly gorgeous with detailed, huge spritework for the various demons fought and the stages traveled through, and the unparalleled spectacle of the special attacks that trigger screen-wide animation cel-like sequences of the Sailor Soldiers doing their thing. This is among the relatively higher-profile games based on the series the one kind of lost to time, and would benefit the most from a reappraisal through a platform like Arcade Archives, though I'm sure the very nature of it as a licensed product is a headache on that front.

You can't really get far with the series if you hope for more modern adaptations--its heyday was in the '90s and that's where the marketing and tie-in glut remains. The revival of it via Crystal in the last decade didn't lead to a second wave of such material, as Sailor Moon despite its incomparable popularity, importance and cultural weight is still sort of a second-stringer next to franchising juggernauts of ostensibly equal measure, and it remains a gendered divide in that sense too. If we're not talking mobile games and apps that through their nature are even more ephemeral than "traditional" video games--Sailor Moon Drops was liked, played, but it's now gone--the newest physical video game product about the series was 2011's Sailor Moon: La Luna Splende for the DS in its twilight, a puzzle platformer made exclusively for the Italian market. It's both a testament to the long-established anime scene in continental Europe, and the kind of treatment a franchise like this might receive in the dwindling days of a platform that's no longer a target for "real" game development outside of cashing in on the giant userbase before the curtain call. I'm really fascinated by the game for that context and for representing a genre--also gendered--that would have seemed from the outset to be the medium of choice for exploiting a license like Sailor Moon, and how much more diverse the ways people interpreted the series ended up being over the years.

Could also mention other contemporary adaptations of fellow demographic heavyweights, first in Shōjo Kakumei Utena: Itsuka Kakumeisareru Monogatari from 1998, in the Saturn's last year, which adapts Revolutionary Girl Utena into a visual novel but doesn't settle for recapping the show's story, instead telling an original tale with a female player avatar. Utena was never marketed to an extreme degree, so for this rare licensed venture, they approached it with care and intent. It is also fan translated.

Staying on the Saturn path, 1995 saw Magic Knight Rayearth being adapted for the system, and because of the absurd localization difficulties Working Designs faced with the game, it also became the very last official Saturn release in North America in 1998. The game is absolutely worth playing but bittersweet in more senses than just the extraordinary circumstances around its release: a game directed by Rieko Kodama who certainly knows a thing or two about women-led video games was only made possible to be experienced in English by Working Designs's efforts--which involve their customary brand of callous, mean and downright cruel in spirit freestyling over material they deemed too boring or plain from their pop culture-saturated, irony-laden perspectives. It's not a great fit for the game, and it's always something one has to weigh when approaching their body of work.

Lastly and also tangentially to the main topic in Sailor Moon, I posted about Famicom games that featured women in promotional capacity over at the video game box art thread some months ago, and while not every game covered there fits the "for girls" mold, some of them absolutely do... so it might be something to skim through or consult to get some ideas.
 

Kirin

Summon for hire
(he/him)
Pikachu is almost always pictured with the boy character, while Eevee is almost always pictured with the girl. Eevee also gets both more and overall arguably more adorable dressup options than Pikachu does, with the official artwork again presenting Eevee as the more "feminine" option

I'm another guy who picked the Eevee version, buuuuuut I also went with the girl avatar, so... yeah.
 

Beowulf

Son of The Answer Man
(He/Him)
The marketing surrounding Eevee has gradually shifted toward making it a slightly cutesier secondary mascot for Pokémon, and all of the Let's Go promotional material makes explicit what was merely implicit before:





Pikachu is almost always pictured with the boy character, while Eevee is almost always pictured with the girl. Eevee also gets both more and overall arguably more adorable dressup options than Pikachu does, with the official artwork again presenting Eevee as the more "feminine" option



Eevee gets flowers! Pikachu gets a camo t-shirt.
Only one of those is game-accurate! The Pikachu in Let's Go Pikachu has the heart-tail. (And, as such, is a girl.)
 

Tegan

dirtbag lesbian
(She/Her)
The Partner Pikachu and Eevee can be either male or female. It's determined at the start of the game before you even get your Partner, so you can just check its tail in the opening cutscene and reset if you want the other option!
 

Ludendorkk

(he/him)
A personal favourite is 1995's Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon for the arcades, developed by Gazelle, a developer that isn't really known for much since their original output consisted of three games. As ex-Toaplan folks, they continued making shooters, and after Gazelle's closure, continued making them at companies like Raizing and Cave, but they also participated in contributing to another arcade staple on the downturn with this beat 'em up. It wasn't the first Sailor Moon game in the genre, but it would be the lone one developed for the genre's native context, and I think speaks to the property's gargantuan crossover appeal in that it was "allowed" to fit into the ecosystem of what's a very gendered environment and genre. As a representative example of the kind of game it is, it's also utterly gorgeous with detailed, huge spritework for the various demons fought and the stages traveled through, and the unparalleled spectacle of the special attacks that trigger screen-wide animation cel-like sequences of the Sailor Soldiers doing their thing. This is among the relatively higher-profile games based on the series the one kind of lost to time, and would benefit the most from a reappraisal through a platform like Arcade Archives, though I'm sure the very nature of it as a licensed product is a headache on that front.

I did play this on your personal recommendation a few years ago when I went to Galloping Ghosts and you aren't exaggerating about the graphics, absolutely gorgeous game.
 

Ixo

"This is not my beautiful forum!" - David Byrne
(Hi Guy)
Aye, someone remind me tomorrow to come back and effort post about everything Purple Moon. Particularly Rockett’s New School and the rest of the games in the series.
 

Ixo

"This is not my beautiful forum!" - David Byrne
(Hi Guy)
"Hey Ixo, go make that effort post." Right. I'd considered talking a bit about these games before, but I am Bad at Making Threads and there never really was an opportunity in an existing one for it to come up until now. So thanks Gogglebob!



*hmm hi-hm hm hmm hmm* Purple Moon!
Purple Moon was a short lived game development company from 1996 - 1999 founded by Brenda Laurel that had 8-14 year old girls as its target audience. They eventually branched out beyond just PC games with at least an interactive website and a line of chapter books. Stylistically speaking, I wouldn't hesitate to put them on the same Pinterest board as As Told By Ginger and some of the American Girl books from around the same time frame. Here, take a look:


Can I just take a minute to complain about how much of a pain in the butt it is to get relevant search results with such a generic name?

Growing up, I had a copy of Rockett's New School (and one of the books) so I'll be mostly focusing on it.

First of all, I have to point out the little Rockett figure the game came with. How cool is that? There were also trading cards bundled in, but you only got 7 out of the full 42 card set. I'm not sure what you had to do to get the others. Buy the other games or trade with your friends I guess. Due to the nature of the thing, complete in box copies are a rarity, which makes getting your hands on either of the pack-ins a real pain in the butt. I think the figure can be found on her own, but good luck with getting "Purple Moon Adventure Cards" to get you anywhere.

You play as Rockett Movado, a new to town 8th grader, on her first day of class at Whistling Pines Junior High. That's it. That's the whole plot. Survive your first day in a new junior high. The game itself is set up like a visual novel with a couple of extra bits tossed in, alternating between animated (eh... "animated." Think elaborate slide show.) fully voiced scenarios and choice screens. Since this is a game for literal 8 year olds, there aren't any real "failure states" that I remember, and there's a rewind function if you don't like how the story is progressing and want to go back to try a different option. However, there are secret bonuses in some cases for making it through to the end without using the rewind. There's 45 different endings to this game according to the back of the box, which surprises me a little. I know I never played through it enough times to see all of that. The basic structure of the day doesn't really change much between choices so I can't fathom 45 endings. There's no way.

The choices after each scenario basically boil down to "Gung-Ho" "Defeatist" and "Woke Up on the Wrong Side of the Bed" represented by different expressions in thought bubbles. There's a little blurb of inner dialogue accompanying each option when you hover over them.

In between scenarios, or whenever the icon's on the screen, you can poke around in lockers or dig around in Rockett's backpack to get supplemental information about the other students or just see whatever's going on in Rockett's head. It's a clever way to cram in a lot of stuff to help the player make their decisions in the scenarios without overloading on dialogue. Inside the lockers you find letters from one student to another, family photos, journal entries, with everything placed to give you a solid idea of who these kids are and who they hang out with. I remember being confused as a kid looking at lockers for students that I never ran into during game play, wondering if I'd missed something entirely. More motivation to go back and try all the different options.



Speaking of the other kids, the dialogue is...uh... It sure is a 90's game. The different cliques have nicknames for themselves, there are social hierarchies, lots of stereotypical 8th grade stuff. Every adult is written like a big exagerated goober. There are attempts at diversity, which is great for 1997, but they come off as more cliche than genuine. There's an inclusion of a character with a physical handicap that is handled with all the grace that a group of junior high students can muster. Great on the realistic reaction front, but geez guys what the heck.

The presentation also falls firmly in the "It sure is a 90's game" camp. There's a soft almost colored pencil quality to the art, with sound effects that match the atmosphere pretty well. The background music while you're digging around in the backpack stands out. The first game isn't quite so bad about it, but the sequel games' art noticeably varies in quality from scene to scene. It never hits like, Klasky-Cuspo levels of lumpy, but there's a big difference in how on model the key art is vs the fill-in stuff. It's jarring. Plus, they dropped the colored pencil style for a more cartoon-y look that I'm sure was a decision that came down to production time and cost, but I personally think was a visual downgrade. However, by the time Rockett's Camp Adventures rolled around, Mattel had bought the property and the extra funding very much shows. There's so much more consistency and polish in the art, even if the softer style doesn't return.

I feel Rockett's New School really excels at dropping you into the setting and making each student unique (note that I said unique, not believable), but thaaaaat's about it. The plot doesn't wildly diverge depending on the choices made, and even then the options you do get input on are pretty inconsequential. As far as I understand, there's not a golden or true ending to the game, and as a matter of fact the whole thing just quits. No "Okay, you did it! Wanna play again?" or anything. It goes from the last scenario to just a screen of Rockett's head shot. There's even a note in the manual about it. Look at the What's Next Section:


Just...what? "Okay, if you make it to this nondescript screen, you're done!" It really feels like the actual game play was just an afterthought to the rest, and it makes a ton of sense that the company branched out to companion books. It's probably best if Rockett's New School is treated as a scene setter for the following games, since they do a much better job about making the player choices matter, and include different actual branching stories.

A play through start to finish will take you between an hour and an hour and a half, depending on how much you want to click around in the lockers. The ISO's up on archive.org along with several other games in the franchise if you want to give it a spin in a Windows 95 virtual machine.

I will mention that some of the students show up in Purple Moon's other game series Secret Paths to _____ but I don't have any first hand experience with those. You can also Wayback Machine purple-moon.com but the captures are pretty hit & miss with what actually functions, and there's no way to access the not insignificant sections of the site that rely on user login.
 

LBD_Nytetrayn

..and his little cat, too
(He/him)
One I would recommend is Freedom Planet. It's a Genesis-inspired action platformer (bits of Sonic, but more) whose playable characters are all female. It has kind of a Sunday morning cartoon vibe to me, and I just really dig it.

Another (that I can't recommend first-hand but have heard about) is Them's Fightin' Herds. It started out as a My Little Pony fighting fan game, but then showrunner Lauren Faust offered to create new, original characters for it. I haven't followed too closely, but I think it was featured at EVO one year recently?

I think she's currently doing DC Superhero Girls, which apparently *Nintendo* is making a Switch game of that comes out June 4th.

Speaking of Nintendo, I think the Famicom Detective Club games that are supposed to be out soon have a female lead? (Not that that makes it for girls, but it's worth a look, at least?)

Those are all I can think of in recent at the moment.
 

Peklo

Oh! Create!
(they/them, she/her)
Speaking of Nintendo, I think the Famicom Detective Club games that are supposed to be out soon have a female lead? (Not that that makes it for girls, but it's worth a look, at least?)

They absolutely don't have that. Both games are played from the perspective of a boy detective.
 

gogglebob

The Goggles Do Nothing
(he/him)
Rocket what are you doing rummaging around other people's lockers and looking at their family photos!? Don't make me confiscate your Girl Message Getter!

For the record, I was apprehensive about making this thread, but these "effort posts" have been delightful and informative (even if I'm vaguely upset that Moco Moco Friends is regarded as having been ignored). Also, being reminded of DC Superhero Girls gives me hope for the future/playing as Batgirl.
 

Beowulf

Son of The Answer Man
(He/Him)
Also, being reminded of DC Superhero Girls gives me hope for the future/playing as Batgirl.
I hope that DC Superhero girls remains a franchise for a long, long time, because any time Bumblebee shows up in something, my dad gets a royalty.

Also, a Nintendo-made DC Superhero girls game? I am ON BOARD for that.
 
Top