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  #1  
Old 04-19-2010, 11:59 AM
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Default What grows in your garden?

It's springtime, and since the only things i plant are things i plan to eat, i figured the food forum was the best place for this =)

This year, i'm trying to see what grows in my windswept antarctic san francisco apartment deck. Last year, peas and beans worked really well, but peppers and zuccini attracted aphids like crazy.

this year, i put in green beans and eggplant, and for shits and giggles, i'm trying cauliflower, even though it's nominally a winter vegetable.
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Old 04-19-2010, 12:05 PM
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I'm still waiting for the nights to get non-freezing. =/ Our usual last-frost date is in a week or so, the days are nice and warm but every 2-3 nights it dips back down to 32 and irritates the hell out of me.

Planning on carrots, lettuce, onions, potatoes, a zucchini plant, green/garden beans, tomatoes.. want to do some other things but am not sure what else to go for.

Last year I tried planting a couple of corn plants, but they never reached maturity, for unknown reasons (sprouted ears o' corn but very undersized and kind of malformed).
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Old 04-19-2010, 12:07 PM
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In the past we've had pumpkins, strawberries and tomatoes, and my wife wants to grow pumpkins again for Halloween. I'm not so sure it'll work out this year, though; we don't have much time for yard maintenance these days, and I've no skill with plants.
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Old 04-19-2010, 12:35 PM
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Last year we planted eggplants, and they grew like weeds. We had more eggplant than Eggplant Wizard.

Anyway: Onions, tomatoes, bell peppers, peppers, and okra.
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Old 04-19-2010, 12:45 PM
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I normally just grow strawberries (which are doing phenomenal so far this year), but on a whim I planted a few pepper plants as well: serrano, cowhorn and red hot cherry.

Speaking of which, anyone with pepper growing experience have any tips for a newbie?

Last edited by TheSL; 04-19-2010 at 12:56 PM.
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Old 04-19-2010, 01:01 PM
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Let's see!

We have tomatoes, chard, soybeans, pole beans, zucchini, red peppers, green peppers, onions, two varieties of cucumber... and I think that's about it. oh we also have some thyme, oregano, and parsley

We tried some cantaloupe but the seeds never sprouted, we might try again now that its warmer.
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Old 04-19-2010, 01:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSL View Post
Speaking of which, anyone with pepper growing experience have any tips for a newbie?
Peppers are the easiest plant in the world to care for. All they really want is heat, and lots of it. Just make sure to not let the soil dry out too much, and you'll be fine.
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Old 04-19-2010, 01:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nunix View Post
I'm still waiting for the nights to get non-freezing. =/ Our usual last-frost date is in a week or so, the days are nice and warm but every 2-3 nights it dips back down to 32 and irritates the hell out of me.
As I live in a high desert, I hear this. All my coworkers who garden recommend those water wall things.

I keep debating building some raised boxes in our (very small) backyard, but that would involve taking out all the gravel and pavers and just a hell of a lot of work when there are other things around the house that we need to tackle this summer.

Still, our own spinach, green beans and lettuce would be lovely. I would also love to grow quinoa, but I've never seen it done and don't know how feasible it is.
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Old 04-19-2010, 05:29 PM
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I've got a pretty nice vegetable garden, where I grow kohlrabi, beans, beets, carrots and various kinds of squash, peppers and tomatoes. There's also a really nice black berry patch out back that yields a couple dozen quarts of fruit every year. I can't wait for the summer, because there's nothing better than fresh fruit and veggies.

I know this is the food forum, but here's a picture of the flower garden I tilled and planted for my mom a few years ago. Those pink Stargazer lilies usually hit the 5 foot mark--they're supposed to be half that, but for whatever reason they just keep getting taller.
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Old 04-20-2010, 04:30 AM
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I wish I had a garden.
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  #11  
Old 04-20-2010, 04:33 AM
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I've been feeling the garden itch too, but for aesthetic reasons not dietary ones. I don't know where to properly begin, but I know the first step is digging out all the chopped trees, bushes and weeds I have. I used to have a tomato garden but it yielded very little, and I don't want to be eating food outdoor bugs and bacteria have gotten their grubby hands on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen View Post
I know this is the food forum, but here's a picture of the flower garden I tilled and planted for my mom a few years ago. Those pink Stargazer lilies usually hit the 5 foot mark--they're supposed to be half that, but for whatever reason they just keep getting taller.
That looks great. Dude, how do I do this?
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  #12  
Old 04-20-2010, 08:00 AM
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We mostly stick to herbs, because the deer don't eat them: Rosemary (our bush has gotten huge), Basil, Thyme, Oregano, Lavendar, Chives, etc. Sometimes I plant some dill. We've also done peppers, but haven't put any in yet this year.

But! I planted a raspberry bush clipping. Here's hoping it takes. Mmm, raspberries.
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  #13  
Old 04-20-2010, 08:30 AM
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Quote:
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I wish I had a garden.
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  #14  
Old 04-20-2010, 11:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dizzy View Post
I've been feeling the garden itch too, but for aesthetic reasons not dietary ones. I don't know where to properly begin, but I know the first step is digging out all the chopped trees, bushes and weeds I have. I used to have a tomato garden but it yielded very little, and I don't want to be eating food outdoor bugs and bacteria have gotten their grubby hands on.

That looks great. Dude, how do I do this?
You're on the right track by digging up all the sod, weeds and whatnot. After that you need hire someone to plow it or borrow or a rototiller or do something to loosen the soil up. It's a good idea to buy and add some high quality top soil at that time. Then, you need to pick flowers based on how much sun that spot gets and how harsh/wet your climate is. The garden in that picture is in partial shade and we get nasty winters, so we picked stuff that's hardy and doesn't need a ton of sun, like lilies and hosta. We also tried to pick flowers that bloom at different times of the year so that there'd always be something to look at--crocus leads to hyacinth leads to tulips all the way through August when the dahlias bloom.

If you don't have access to a tiller or plow, or your soil is really shitty, you can make a raised garden by filling wooden boxes, old tires or something similar with topsoil. Those are nice because you can place them anywhere, you can buy really good soil for them and they usually have nice, consistent drainage.

I cannot fucking wait to get out and start working on my garden this weekend.
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  #15  
Old 04-21-2010, 07:56 AM
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My soil is so, so shitty. Basically you go three inches down and you hit clay that you can make pots out of (in fact, people do make pots out of it). We have most of our herbs in a raised bed, and anything else we want to plant involves a lot of back-braking digging out of packed clay and mixing in a lot of purchased topsoil and/or soil conditioner. Pain in the ass, and one reason why we don't plant even more stuff.
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  #16  
Old 04-21-2010, 08:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Violentvixen View Post
I would also love to grow quinoa, but I've never seen it done and don't know how feasible it is.
If you're in a high desert, I would guess that quinoa would do great, as it's an Andean plant, and the Andes are largely high desert.
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Old 04-21-2010, 09:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grant View Post
If you're in a high desert, I would guess that quinoa would do great, as it's an Andean plant, and the Andes are largely high desert.
Yeah, that's what made me think it was worth a shot. I just don't know a thing about soil so I have no idea if our backyard would be good.

I also wonder if it's like corn and you need to plant a certain amount for the stalks to even bear seeds. A quick Google didn't say anything like that, although I did discover that the plants grow six feet tall which should be interesting.
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Old 04-21-2010, 09:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Violentvixen View Post
Yeah, that's what made me think it was worth a shot. I just don't know a thing about soil so I have no idea if our backyard would be good.
Most yard soil isn't good for anything; usually the pH is off, if nothing else is, and you're typically missing a lot of nutrients as well. You can buy little soil-testing kits (Fred Meyers should have some) to check, but more than likely you'll wind up needing to get ahold of some good dirt, and you'll want some raised beds to put it in.
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Old 04-22-2010, 10:06 AM
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The stone slab outside my window has a small tree, somehow. 14 stories up, growing from a crack. Unfortunately, it's not fruit-bearing.
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  #20  
Old 05-11-2010, 01:29 PM
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Have any of you tried those small temporary greenhouses? Something like this. We have very limited space and only a couple of hours of direct sunlight a day so I'm starting to lean in that direction. But they're hundreds of dollars so I'm reluctant to just get one. Any experience notes would be appreciated!
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  #21  
Old 05-11-2010, 04:38 PM
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No idea on greenhouses. =/

Finally did the last of the planting now that the frost seems to be over with: tomatoes (several kinds), potatoes, carrots, lettuce, radishes, beets, cucumbers, green beans, onions, plus a bunch of herbs. Have plenty of room left so once things start to come up and I've moved and thinned the rows a little, might plant some more stuff.
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Old 05-12-2010, 07:40 AM
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Something practically dug up my newly planted basil plants and nearly broke the stem of one entirely. I propped it back up and I'm actually amazed it's not dead already... we'll see if it survives.
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  #23  
Old 05-28-2010, 04:38 PM
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Some things are coming up! But there's been fuck-all for sunlight for a couple of weeks, now, so tomatoes, carrots, and cucumbers are MIA. Radishes and potatoes are growin' like crazy though.
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  #24  
Old 05-31-2010, 08:53 AM
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Most of my plants aren't blooming yet*, but at least they're still alive. However!



Red hot cherry!



Cowhorn! (~2" so far)

*I mean, other than the strawberries, but they're boring
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Old 05-31-2010, 11:37 AM
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So we tore out the failing cauliflower experiment and replaced them with strawberries and a bell pepper. hopefully it will work better!
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Old 05-31-2010, 08:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shivam View Post
So we tore out the failing cauliflower experiment and replaced them with strawberries and a bell pepper. hopefully it will work better!
I hope so. We planted strawberries a few weeks ago and haven't seen any sign of them since. Fingers Crossed.
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Old 06-29-2010, 06:29 PM
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I'll add some photos to this thread. Here's what I harvested today:



It's getting hot enough here that all my tomato plants are just about done until fall (if spider mites don't kill them before then). The cucumbers, melons, and okra are really taking off, so now I can start making a bunch of pickles and, a few weeks from now, cantaloupe ice cream.



Baby okra



future Mickylee watermelon (super tiny right now)


Honey rock melon patch
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Old 06-29-2010, 08:50 PM
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I am jealous of folks with gardens! My city-bound location is too concrete-laden to support actual life.
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  #29  
Old 06-30-2010, 09:30 AM
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My dill plant started growing a flower, so I harvested most of the plant and am hoping I get a second growth this season. I discovered after a couple failed attempts that this is the way to do it if you want maximum dill leafage.

We also picked some fresh basil, oregano, and thyme. Mmm, herbs.
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Old 07-01-2010, 03:28 AM
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We planted sweet peas, tomatoes, and raspberries in our garden, because the best produce is obviously the sweetest tasting. I know tomatoes aren't sweet, but you cant have BLTs without them, so that gives us an excuse.
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