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  #1  
Old 05-07-2012, 08:55 AM
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Default Killing 8-bit Trees with E-Readers!

I know I'm not the only person with an e-reader on the forum. I have a Kindle 2 with free forever 3G (this is the last one with the keyboard). It's a nice little workhorse.

This weekend as the Missus and I begin looking to downsize before the move in the fall. I went through my books, anything that I could get for free on the Kindle went into a stack.

By the end of the day that stack had over 100 books in it!? Then I went through the stack and sold as many of them as I could back to Amazon, the rest went on freecycle.

I ended up shipping a 40pd box of books to Amazon for $80 worth of credit.

Has anyone else bit the bullet with their e-reader and started using it to replace their dead tree library?

Would some of you never do that even if you could?
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  #2  
Old 05-07-2012, 09:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Falselogic View Post
Would some of you never do that even if you could?
I would not replace all of my books, just...just...

I would not replace my books.

I just can't. Books are physical things I enjoy (even if I don't read that much). It's not like games where you put your game in your system, install it and don't need to touch the game again until you're finished.
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Old 05-07-2012, 09:27 AM
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Originally Posted by DANoWAR View Post
I would not replace all of my books, just...just...

I would not replace my books.

I just can't. Books are physical things I enjoy (even if I don't read that much). It's not like games where you put your game in your system, install it and don't need to touch the game again until you're finished.
It's just like that! I still have all the information that was in the books that I got rid of. Now though their in bits instead of blots of ink on paper. The information hasn't changed the medium.
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Old 05-07-2012, 10:28 AM
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Books take up a ton of space in my apartment and are a pain in the ass to move, and that's the way I like it!

I have a Kindle Touch. I've used it a bit, but I haven't latched on to it the way some people have. I'm annoyed that the lines are all right justified, and also that I can't flip through pages quickly (one of the books I read was a textbook), and that there isn't any cover. I tend to buy a lot of books used and loan them out constantly (I have multiple copies of some of my favorites), so I don't see myself actually getting rid of books on purpose. I feel like I have too many gadgets as is, between my iPhone, Macbook Air, DSi and Vita. I tend to just bring my iPhone with me and spend more time reading on the Instapaper app than the Kindle. And I had Instapaper articles sent to Kindle for a while, but the interface is considerably worse than the iOS app.

Sorry to come in here to crap on eReaders, it's not so much that I dislike them as they just don't fit into my life.
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Old 05-07-2012, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by patrick View Post
Books take up a ton of space in my apartment and are a pain in the ass to move, and that's the way I like it!
X1000

I do like the kindle though. It's really really convenient and kind of fun. I'm not sure why e-books are so novel to me, but it's just kind of cool to use.
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Old 05-07-2012, 12:41 PM
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I've stopped buying paper books whenever possible. Between the Kindle and the iPad, I simply don't feel much need for them. The iPad is great for the ore graphically-rich stuff, the Kindle for anything that's just text. If you'd have asked me five years ago, I'd have said I'd never get the Kindle, that books were just too good.

But... Having gotten a Kindle, I find I read way more than I used to. The amount of effort involved in reading is way lower, since I almost always have it with me, it fits in my pocket, and it's got all my stuff on it. And I can read it in sunlight - which, let me tell you, is GREAT for my "I need to be outside more" moments. And when sitting up and reading in bed, I don't need to worry about the logistics of turning pages...
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Old 05-09-2012, 07:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Falselogic View Post
free forever 3G
For as long as there is a 3G. Currently, the 2G networks are being scrapped in order to provide spectrum for 4G and I suspect the same will happen in the next generation.

And I love my e-reader! But it's more for convenience of carrying a library around with me, not looking to replace real books. I feel the same about digital comics, the experience is tied to the physical media unlike music, movies, tv, etc.
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Old 05-09-2012, 11:50 AM
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I've considered buying an e-reader, but I don't think it would be worth the investment for me. I already read a lot, so maybe the extra portability would increase that, but probably not by much. And I borrow most of my books from the library/friends/family nowadays, so I don't think it would save me much money. I also suspect that if I were to get an e-reader I would start a whole bunch of books without finishing them and that's not something I need.

But I do understand the appeal and it is very tempting.
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Old 05-09-2012, 01:44 PM
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About a year after buying my Nook I find that I split Ebooks and physical ones pretty much down the middle. Though I tend to buy authors I am used to reading in physical form in that format and authors I am used to in Ebook on Ebook. In other words I just bought The Wind Through The Keyhole as a book but will almost certainly buy Redshirts as an Ebook.

Interestingly enough though this is shifting a bit, thanks to my new job whose employee discount makes physical books ridiculously cheap. If say Mucho Mojo costs me ten dollars for an ebook and three for a physical. Its not even a choice. Even if the rest of my Lansdale is electronic.

That being said, I fully intend to buy as many comics as possible in eformat. Right now that means mostly Marvel, I am collecting Grant Morrison's Run on Xmen. And picked up Ultimates and New Avengers in the wake of The Avengers. Its just way more convenient than shelves full of trades.

What I like about ereaders is the serendipity they allow for. I pick up a Peter Straub non fiction collection that had no idea existed for five bucks, and in it I read an excellent essay on Lawerence Blocks Scudder series. I go to Lawerence Blocks page and see that the first Scudder books are .99 cents a pop. The ease of purchase makes it somewhere beyond even an impulse buy. That being said the majority of pricing is nowhere near that reasonable. But its nice that the older catalogue titles are moving in that direction rather than being used to bolster arbitrary price points.
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Old 05-09-2012, 04:32 PM
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No. Absolutely, positively, definitively not. I collect video game books, man! They're one of a kind, and while I don't read them that often, I could never just give them up because I had them in a digital format. I feel the same way about my old fanzines. Again, I don't read them very often, but they're MINE, and I'll sit on them like a dragon on his horde 'till the day I die.

Having said that, I'd like to have electronic versions of all my literature as an option. It'd be nice to flip through the pages of Ken Uston's SCORE! Beating the Top Sixteen Video Games without the risk of harming my original copy. Same goes for Mastering Pac-Man (which isn't in great shape, but whatever) and the tons of old magazines I either have or once had. I'd love... just absolutely LOVE to have all the issues of Video Games and Computer Entertainment at my fingertips.

I don't currently have an e-reader, but the Android phone I've got coming in the mail can be used for that purpose. And likely will be once it arrives. It's got 24 gigs of total storage... might as well make the most of it!
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Old 05-10-2012, 05:09 AM
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I like how unabashedly anti-ereader this thread is. :3c

Personally I'm fascinated by the technology behind e-ink screens. The display works on a deceptively simple mechanism. I'm just waiting for colour e-ink to become a thing. Right now a few companies have pulled it off, but it looks very washed-out, like reading old newspaper comics.



I'd like to see colour readers in higher resolutions, in the hopes that comic book publishers will give them more support. I'd love it if Vertical started publishing to e-readers.
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  #12  
Old 05-10-2012, 05:40 AM
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Originally Posted by teg View Post
I like how unabashedly anti-ereader this thread is. :3c
Here's the thing, though. Even as much as we love books, they fall apart. They go out of print. An e-book is pretty much just html, it's small and dumb and you can read it on almost anything.

Even as a kid trying to read things from the public library, there were always the dread words "not in print" and "unavailable for request." Ever since the government ruled that the unsold inventory of books was taxable, books have been destroyed by bookstores because of the costs of storing the stock. Libraries remove books that aren't checked out frequently enough because of the costs of maintaining inventory. E-books now make the long tail work in favor of the reader.
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Old 05-10-2012, 08:21 AM
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Here's the thing, though. Even as much as we love books, they fall apart. They go out of print. An e-book is pretty much just html, it's small and dumb and you can read it on almost anything.

Even as a kid trying to read things from the public library, there were always the dread words "not in print" and "unavailable for request." Ever since the government ruled that the unsold inventory of books was taxable, books have been destroyed by bookstores because of the costs of storing the stock. Libraries remove books that aren't checked out frequently enough because of the costs of maintaining inventory. E-books now make the long tail work in favor of the reader.
An e-book is HTML plus really restrictive DRM. You can't own an e-book, only lease it from the publisher. If a publisher goes out of business, the book is no longer available at all. The reason that books go out of print is not because of issues with physical media, but because of copyright law. No one can print a book except for the owner of the copyright, and copyright lasts for the life of the author plus 70 years (for the most part, there are tons of exceptions). For a huge number of books, the owner of the copyright is unknown, and it is illegal for anyone to print new copies of them (and that includes creating digital copies).

So, on a technical level e-books would allow libraries to store more books, and online bookstores are effectively infinite, but copyright issues and licensing agreements are going to create the same issues that you are complaining about.
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Old 05-10-2012, 06:09 AM
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Originally Posted by teg View Post
I'm just waiting for colour e-ink to become a thing.
This is pretty much me. From time to time I really crave getting a Kindle, but I'm certain that we're close to some really nice color e-ink screens and I stay my hand.

I would never consider reading on any sort of backlit device, considering how much of my day is spent staring at backlit screens to begin with. I'd really like my eyes to last until I'm old.
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Old 05-16-2012, 03:45 AM
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I've bought a few books through iBook on my iPod touch, but the selection is poor relative to Amazon's new and used physical book selection.

How does lending or renting work for digital books? I do most of my paper book reading through libraries, so I don't need to hold onto most books forever.

In general, how are digital comics, especially on a good display like iPad 3's? I assume a big problem is that, unlike text, there's no easy way to reformat comic panels for different screens, but comics still have to sell to all varieties of gadgets.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eusis View Post
For a book, it just feels very different, especially when you go to varying vintages, an eReader won't be capturing that.
Many of the classics were handwritten, written on parchment, papyrus, scrolls, etc. You don't get those experiences from a physical bookstore. Since it's cheaper to send bits than pages, there could be a market for handwritten books scanned and distributed as a series of JPEGs.

Last edited by Vega; 05-16-2012 at 04:15 AM.
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Old 05-16-2012, 03:49 AM
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In general, how are digital comics, especially on a good display like iPad 3's? I assume a big problem is that, unlike text, there's no easy way to reformat comic panels for different screens, but comics still have to sell to all varieties of gadgets.
Digital comics are great on the iPad3. You don't have to reformat the panels (I think they just script panning motions anyway for small screens). On a tablet, you just read a full page on the tablet screen, although I have to hold the tablet portait to read a single full page and hold it landscape to read a two-page splash layout. People with better eyes may be able to always hold it landscape for continuous two-page reading. The new HD resolution supports it, it's just too tiny for me.
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Old 05-16-2012, 09:51 PM
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Digital comics are great on the iPad3.
I should have worded that differently. Of course the iPad 3 is the gold standard for digital comics viewing, but will it go to waste if comics publishers aim for the lowest common denominator and standardize on Kindle Fire's 7 inch 1024 x 600 screen? Are they doing so?
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Old 05-16-2012, 10:01 PM
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I should have worded that differently. Of course the iPad 3 is the gold standard for digital comics viewing, but will it go to waste if comics publishers aim for the lowest common denominator and standardize on Kindle Fire's 7 inch 1024 x 600 screen? Are they doing so?
Comics publishers are still aiming for the standard print comic sizes they always have. The iPad is good at displaying these as-is; other screens with some minor alterations. Given the huge aunt of easily-scanned material out there in this format, I have a hard time seeing why they'd change.
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Old 05-17-2012, 03:54 AM
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Comixology upgraded their format for the iPad 3: comics tagged CMX-HD in the digital store are "retina" resolution. The new issues seem to be coming out at this resolution and they're updating the back catalog. I bought the new Batwoman run when I got the iPad 3 and issue #1 was at old resolution and #2+ was at HD. It all looked really good, though. That article says you only get the increased resolution (and file size) if you're downloading to the iPad 3, though. Comixology has free issues so try viewing one on your PC and you'll see even the non-HD images look pretty good on a computer screen (at least, they look good on a friend's Xoom tablet).

Now if you're buying DC graphic novels from Amazon, those are probably intended for the Kindle Fire, so I don't know that they'd upgrade the resolution yet. But the Fire won't be the last table Amazon releases.
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Old 05-16-2012, 08:37 AM
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Quote:
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Many of the classics were handwritten, written on parchment, papyrus, scrolls, etc. You don't get those experiences from a physical bookstore. Since it's cheaper to send bits than pages, there could be a market for handwritten books scanned and distributed as a series of JPEGs.
Well, my distaste for ebooks is not a striving for authenticity. I read far too many translated pocket books for that sort of reasoning to make sense, and I think authenticity is basically a petit-bourgeois sort of value to prescribe to any cultural experience. I cannot ever experience the Illiad in an authentic manner because my response to it will obviously be colored by millenia of societal and cultural changes.

So, yeah, I don't think the physical form of the book is more authentic, I just prefer the way a book gets structured around it. I would prefer reading a book over reading a handwritten manuscript or a papyrus as well, at least if my main purpose was to absorb the text as opposed to analyze the author's handwriting.
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Old 05-16-2012, 10:11 AM
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How does lending or renting work for digital books? I do most of my paper book reading through libraries, so I don't need to hold onto most books forever.
Generally depends on some kind of DRM system. Basically, you get a copy of the book and a license that tells the DRM system on your reader "stop permitting this to be read after such-and-such date."
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Old 10-13-2012, 11:02 PM
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I myself am struggling with the e-reader dilemma as within the next year I will be moving cross-country, and depending on how I end up getting everything there, the massive weight of my book collection may or may not be a massive problem price-wise.

My mom got a Kindle herself recently, and I have in fact got to mess about with it. I had to configure it for her, get her some samples, and other programmery, and she loves it. I even got her to get the Sword of Shannara trilogy as one of her first purchases, and she's really getting into that also.

As for me, aside from the concern over having to move that behemoth, I also have trouble getting rid of something so wonderfully simple as physical books. I'm not sure about my long-term adjustment to an e-reader, and I already have a full and overflowing shelf of hardbacks I have acquired over the years, including the entire Shannara series (some of which are autographed), and a nearly complete Dave Barry hardback collection. Those I know I wouldn't get rid of even if I could carry them around with me digitally, and I'd hate re-buying books I already have just for the added convenience. This is all a bit silly as I readily embraced steam and other digital game platforms, including my first day one 3DS purchase of New Super Mario Bros. 2, and I have in-fact bought games I already owned just for the minor upgrades and to not have to swap things about. Maybe I'm just weird.
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Old 10-14-2012, 04:54 AM
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As for me, aside from the concern over having to move that behemoth, I also have trouble getting rid of something so wonderfully simple as physical books. I'm not sure about my long-term adjustment to an e-reader, and I already have a full and overflowing shelf of hardbacks I have acquired over the years, including the entire Shannara series (some of which are autographed), and a nearly complete Dave Barry hardback collection. Those I know I wouldn't get rid of even if I could carry them around with me digitally, and I'd hate re-buying books I already have just for the added convenience. This is all a bit silly as I readily embraced steam and other digital game platforms, including my first day one 3DS purchase of New Super Mario Bros. 2, and I have in-fact bought games I already owned just for the minor upgrades and to not have to swap things about. Maybe I'm just weird.
No, you're not. If the world's electronics will ever cease to work, you won't be able to play any more video games, regardless of you having them physical or digital. Real books, on the other hand...
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Old 10-14-2012, 05:51 AM
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Seconding that ads are not a dealbreaker. You see an ad at the bottom of the home screen and when you put the kindle into sleep mode, and that's it. In fact, if you keep it disconnected from wireless long enough (a few days, not at all uncommon for me anyway), it runs out of ads and you get a screensaver (with a note asking you to reconnect).
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Old 10-14-2012, 06:04 AM
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I bought a book scanner (difference: scanning surface goes to the edge) and have been slowly digitizing my collection. Emphasis on sloooowly. Doing this on my own I really begin to get why this service basically costs as much as it would cost to just buy a replacement copy.

I've got about 1500 physical books. The ones I have digital copies of are in boxes in my in-laws' basement. The others are on shelves here. After three years of Nook ownership, I'm starting to seriously consider offloading my collection. I'm... just not going to read them again. Not physically. There are some autographed books I'll keep, and some editions I'm particularly sentimental for, but other than that... they're just taking up space.

The only problem is convincing my hindbrain that 1) the apocalypse is not going to come and 2) if it does, I'll have more pressing issues than whether I can still read Asimov's Foundation series. Because carting around 40 Staples copy paper boxes full of books does not a survivor make.
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Old 10-23-2012, 09:55 AM
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Something that may be news to ebook hungry people, and that I just discovered myself: Baen has an ebook store, and while they apparently believe that usability and graphic design are of the devil, it's got some great stuff at great prices. In particular, check out the Monthly Baen Bundles and Book Bundles sections. Also, they make it pretty easy to deliver them by email to your kindle account (just click on 'ereader instructions' at the top), they're all DRM free, and you can download them in copious other formats as well.

Highlights include the entire Fafhrd and Grey Mouser collection for $35 (note: this is some kind of sale, it is normally $62, and I'm not sure when the sale ends), or nine of the CoDominium books for $36 (not a sale, just the price).

www.baenebooks.com
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Old 10-23-2012, 10:20 AM
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Yeah, Baen was being awesome about eBooks before anyone knew eBooks existed. It is, I believe, one of the reasons why such an aggressively niche company (there isn't actually a huge market for badly written right-wing power fantasy sci-fi) is still thriving.

It's also worth noting that the latest Amazon DRM snafu is a great example of why DRM is not long for this world. I'll be really surprised if they get through this without some EU regulator ripping them a new one.
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Old 03-18-2013, 10:39 PM
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Certainly sounds great. I bought it, so here's hoping it is!
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  #29  
Old 03-25-2013, 01:01 PM
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Weird question: is it possible to read legally purchased e-books, from any particular source (Amazon, etc.), on a PC with no Internet access? Say, if the books were put onto the PC via flash drive.

I'm asking because my wife's job is typically mind-numblingly slow and boring. The computers at her office have no Internet access and her boss has a hard rule about no cell phone usage for texting/games/Internet except on breaks. I'm trying to find SOME way for her to have something entertaining to do that doesn't look suspicious.
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Old 03-25-2013, 01:21 PM
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I think Calibre comes with an external ebook viewer that can display most things you throw at it. Or you could just use it to convert them to another format you can easily view on PCs.
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