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Old 02-27-2019, 05:13 PM
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Default It's Good to Read the King: The Jack Kirby Thread

Mostly I started this thread since I want to do a deep dive into OMAC but while I guess I could have a thread dedicated to OMAC alone, I feel the 8-issue series might not have the draw of, say, The Fourth World books. I mean, OMAC was definitely influential and there's a lot to discuss but 1) I found out we somehow don't have a Jack Kirby thread already and 2) there are a lot of shorter pieces and oddities that might be worth discussing here, effort post or otherwise.

Or we can even talk about non-Kirby work that Kirby had influenced (if you are a Kirby fan and somehow missed out, read the work of Tom Scioli. Lots of artists do great Kirby pastiches, but Scioli really feels like he goes further an also does more than pay homage and uses the style to further comics story-telling in his own way.

Anyway, I'll be doing an effort post on OMAC #1, which I just finished reading, but feel free to post any Jack "The King" Kirby stuff you want.
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Old 02-27-2019, 05:28 PM
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I whole heartedly approve of this thread. Which shouldn’t be a shock as I have two different threads dedicated to two different significant pieces of Jack Kirby’s work.
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Old 02-27-2019, 07:04 PM
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Effort posts take up a lot of real estate. Click if you want to read it! (and I hope you do).

I don't know when I bought the OMAC collection. I feel like it's been a long time ago. You see, I tend to buy approximately 2 comic book trades every two weeks. One is usually a used comic from the cheapo rack and the other is... anything else, as long as it looks interesting. Fact is, there are so many good looking things, I usually systematically move through all the genre sections of my local comic shop to force me to narrow my choices. Weird, pointless systems are kind of my thing. Anyway, I also have another system: save the best (or what I think will be the best) for last. That means the best comic books I own (or what I suspect are) ferment like a fine wine waiting for me to read them. I have a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Ultimate Collection trade that I got from the Christmas before last.

And often I have a difficult time catching up. I usually read one or two chapters of comics a night in edition to reading other things and getting somewhere in a video game. Sometimes I can sit down and read the whole thing but, again, I have my weird pointless systems in place. And when some of the books I get are really long, that means often I build a big backlog. Finally getting around to reading Stray Bullets set me back pretty far (I also have 9 volumes of The New Teen Titans that have gone unread. They were actually ahead of OMAC and TMNT on my list until I realized the newest volume comes out next month so may as well wait until I'm closer to complete. And I'm not getting Captain Harlock volume 3 for two more weeks so I'm considering this also unfinished.)

So I finally caught up with some big stuff. And I decided to take a bite out of OMAC. I told Octopus Prime I would do a review of the series when I finally got to it so now it is time to keep the promise. The trade actually comes with an interesting intro by comic creator and Kirby ultra-fan (and former production assistant to said man) Mark Evanier who talks about how it was partially inspired by a Captain America comic Kirby never got around to creating about Captain America in a dystopian future (this was before EVERY comic book character was assigned their own personal dystopian future) featuring a new Cap dealing with a new America. Which actually sounds like the premise of that recent Mark Waid-written Cap story, which might not be a coincidence.

So what is the series about? Our comic begins with a strange image: a woman in a box, her body parts not attached to each other.

BTW, for the full effect, I am listening to prog rock while I write this. I believe this is the official genre of Jack Kirby, whether he knows it or not.


It has the usual Kirby bombast, but here it feels less like an words meant to stir the soul in excitement like "Five Minutes Until Blow Up" but a dire warning. Of course, the weird world of Jack Kirby, on the surface, seems too absurd to be prophetic but I feel like, in a way, some parts of it work perfect in a weird way.

After this strange intro, we pull back to see where this broken person is...



I like the weirdness of OMAC's design. The mohawk, the eye on the chest. But while I appreciate the off-beat choice of having an orange and blue costume, the orange part (or at least the legs) don't work for me. Still, I like the look.

We are then told we are seeing the climax of the story and I really like this page. Again, its your usual Kirby dynamism but the women's body parts are used to creepy effect. It's not just that they are, you know, not attached. It's obvious these are robot ladies. But in that first box we saw (which is also in this place) Lila's parts are in the wrong place. Another woman is just falling out in pieces with her... foam, I guess. And another one is just breaking out. It all looks really sinister, even though, in the context of the story, this isn't in and of itself an "evil product". Build a friends just are.

Fact is, I could imagine a lot of helpful uses for a friend you build yourself, especially for people who struggle with loneliness. But while that might be truth, commercializing friendship seems like it could easily get pretty creepy, huh?

Anyway, OMAC starts wrecking house on the Build-a-Friend factory and is horrified with Lila for reasons unknown for now. He then blows the shit out of the factory. It's pretty epic.



That's how you draw a boom (both the event and the effect). We then go back in time a bit to how the story began. Two strange men claim that they have made a hard choice of who to give fantastic powers to.



I like how he gets to have two title pages in this book. Also, I like the look of the GPA agents. They look very silly but there's also something unsettling about their featureless masks. The reason, according to one agent, is that the GPA represents the Earth and all nations. They mention trying to be unbiased in their choice of Buddy Blank and that they are anonymous so know one knows what ethnicity they are. Having not read further than chapter one, I kind of have two ideas about what is going on with them: 1) Jack Kirby wanted to give them a menacing inhuman quality. He wants us to clue into the fact that maybe we should be wary of these dudes. 2) These guys could secretly be bad guys but the way they look also seems to imply that they have made a sacrifice: to make themselves immune from the prejudice of others, they are de-humanized themselves. So are they bad guys operating under the aegis of helping humanity or are they sacrificing something of themselves and, in avoiding prejudice, still suffering from its existence in the world in order to overcome humanity's ills. We'll get to that last point in the epilogue.

Back to the plot: these guys tell a scientist, Myron Forest, that Forest's invention, Brother Eye, will infuse a man named Buddy Blank with fantastic power in order to protect the world from violence stating that any violence, great or small, could ruin society. Brother Eye is a floating satellite that looks like a big eye.



And it can find a person and give him superpowers. It seems to be a man-made satellite but the entity feels like something out of myth. Forest describes that Brother Eye "has been sleeping... sleeping..." and it really feels like he's talking about an ancient god or giant. I might be reading to much into it but Kirby's all about gods and the cosmic, so it does feel right. Eye also states that he and Blank will be "as brothers", which is a weird thing for it to say.

Anyway, cut to Buddy Blank. He's a shlub who is picked on at work by his sexist bully co-workers at Pseudo-People Inc., a company that makes artificial people. Buddy's supervisor doesn't see Buddy being bullied and thinks Buddy just has issues and plays armchair psychiatrist and forces him to go into the "psychology section". This next bit (and Buddy's supervisor) makes me think Kirby might have been pretty suspicious of the practice (or at least elements of it) psychology but this next scene is pretty effective and interesting.







THE DESTRUCT ROOM!

Basically, rather than talking about your emotions, your are expected to indulge them in what is clearly insane excess (also... how big is this room? It was right between the crying room and a hallway). Now we don't have this, but there is an internet trend for people to seek out stories that piss them off or upset them in ways that are indulgent and can be unhealthy. I wish I could cite my resources here since it's been a long time since I heard about it, but I feel like I've seen it. It reminds me of Colbert's speech in the last presidential election where he describes taking in the political news and letting hate burn as drinking too much poison. I feel like there are some people who get used to forcing these emotions and it becomes habitual. Now, I might be reading that wrong or misunderstanding the situation in a fundamental way and if you can course correct me in this way of thinking, I'm up for hearing about it.

But clearly the characters here are much more about indulging to get catharsis and nothing more. And that certainly isn't healthy. I mean, there is often a misunderstanding about how that works. I love horror movies and sometimes when people try to defend the genre, "catharsis" comes up. But this is actually a weaker argument. Our minds aren't letting go of something by watching violence. It is letting more in. And if it can't be processed correctly, it can be harmful. This doesn't make me "anti-horror" but it makes me aware that taking in too much of a certain kind of imagery can have an effect and the mind needs a chance to process it properly rather than searching for a high.

So, that's why I think it might not be a good idea to kick a life-like dummy into a brick wall until his head explodes. At least, do it in moderation, people.

Buddy decides this isn't for him because he's depressed, not angry. But he feels a bit better when he meets a co-worker named Lila, a worker in the company's secret division, whom he feels a connection with. Meanwhile, some weirdos are watching them, mocking Blank for his ignorance. After Blank leaves, the creeps beckon Lila to their underground lair... and begin disassembling her! (which would be a bigger surprise if we didn't already see she was a robot, but still).

Later, Blank stumbles onto the baddies while looking for Lila and they decide to show him what they are really up too... the build-a-friends are also bombs and the company head can use them to assassinate anyone he wants for pay (he does this buy showing him a video of a literary agents building a friend, kissing it and then exploding, which I think is also the plot of Dr. Goldfoot and the Girl Bombs). Just as they are about to kill Buddy, he is transformed in a manner that seems epically Kirby cosmic.



Omac starts wrecking shit and is bullet proof. Weirdly, he's described as "rejecting" the bullets. This could just be a weird choice but considering how cosmic and quasi-New Age Kirby's stuff is in this period, he could literally be rejecting the bullets in a philosophical way but choosing not to let them harm him.

The men leave the room and turn the entire friggin' room into a giant paper shredder but OMAC punches through it. After overcoming a fire vat death trap, OMAC beats everyone else up and laments his only friend is a computerized bomb and that humans are making a mockery of human life. It is then that he realizes who his true enemy is: humankind's capacity for self-destruction. And he's going to save them from themselves. Which, to me, is a really interesting character hook. Obviously, there are some regular-type villains in the book, but I like the idea of a hero who loves humanity but has to live in the horrible world they created and try to fix it. And, of course, being a Kirby comic, rather than through grass roots political action and opening minds through discourse, HE'S GONNA PUNCH SHIT! YEE-HA!

Now connected with Brother Eye, OMAC gets his next mission: find Myron Forest in Electric City and TAKE OUT MR. BIG... WHOEVER THAT IS!

Next Time: The Super Rich can rent cities for assassination! But good luck getting your deposit back. Amiright?
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Old 02-27-2019, 07:23 PM
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“I am OMAC. Evacuate this section, I’m going to DESTROY it” is, of course, the second best line of dialogue in any comic book.
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Old 02-27-2019, 07:30 PM
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I'm going to use this line if I REALLY need to use the bathroom.
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Old 03-04-2019, 07:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Octopus Prime View Post
“I am OMAC. Evacuate this section, I’m going to DESTROY it” is, of course, the second best line of dialogue in any comic book.
I assure you, there is a line of dialogue that will supplant this in this one.


I feel like after reading this one the effort post will require a little less effort. None the less, it is good and Kirby can deliver the Hell out of a high-concept action-packed story. We begin with OMAC trying to enter Electric City.
There he is stopped by some guards who tell him he isn't invited. Turns out the entire city has been rented for a party and OMAC is not on the guest list.
Not that this is going to stop him.



After beating up some guards, OMAC is given a lift by two men in costumes who are going to the party. They tell OMAC that the city is rented in exchange that the city won't have to pay taxes for an entire year. OMAC wanders off, guided by an unseen force to his destination. And that destination is Myron Forest.



This page is high level Kirby. LOOK AT THOSE MACHINES!

Myron Forest explains that he created Brother Eye who, in turn, created OMAC.



I amazed by Kirby that he didn't write that, then dust off his hands and say "My work is done", and then people stopped making fiction because it reached it's apex, focusing instead on saving the oceans or something.

Anyway, Forest explains that he felt that by making one man worth an army that it would basically contain wars. I don't think that logic works out but before OMAC can debate that point, the two costumed guys from earlier reveal themselves to be assassins with a mission to take out Forest and OMAC. They succeed in killing Forest but OMAC survives (again, shades of Captain America). OMAC almost stops the villains but their booby trapped costumes allow them to escape. OMAC is disappointed with Brother Eye for not giving him more power to stop the baddies but Brother Eye reveals that he was trying to use that power to save Forest, to no avail. Now Eye can transfer more power to OMAC so he can go stop Mister Big: the man who rented the city so that he could secretly end Project OMAC! As OMAC walks off, Brother Eye vaporizes Myron's lab so no one else can learn the secrets of OMAC and use them for evil.

OMAC then goes onto hunt for Mister Big and his assassins by intentionally making himself a visible target (though it seems really irresponsible to do so during a well attended parade). After taking down a hot air balloon full of assassins (I could say something about this, but... what?), OMAC is ambushed and seemingly killed.

Mister Big looks over the body when he is suddenly put under arrest by the mayor and the GPA. The GPA reveal OMAC is alive. He was never actually wounded by instead they used Brother Eye to fake some fatal wounds while OMAC and Brother Eye recorded them talking about their plans. GPA thanks OMAC for his help and tell him he is necessary in a world where large armies are outlawed (wait, really? That's... something interesting I might have missed before).

OMAC talks about how great Brother Eye is and looks really creepy while doing so.




A great issue but I feel like there's less for me to dig into here. It front loads the issue with the idea of a wealthy man using his wealth to rent a city but there doesn't seem to be much commentary in the concept, somehow. Especially since the front cover implies it is about a villain literally throwing money at the problem.

The only thing I will touch on is the implication that OMAC actually can't remember being Buddy Blank, an interesting and creepy idea that I hope Kirby runs with later on. Despite the last issue (which is also the first issue) being the origin, this feels like the "Captain America" origin and is specifically about OMAC having to carry the burden of war so no one else need to. But the fact that Buddy had no say in it has potential for this to become morally murky. Then again, I have no idea what Jack's opinion of the draft was but surely he's got to see the moral complexity of taking away a man, even if it is to replace him with a better man.

I'll also say that this aspect may well be the inspiration for Grant Morrison's The Filth, in which the main character learns he is a sleeper agent for a secret society cynically protecting humanity from anti-people but in fact may be more interested in enforcing status quos than helping people. I'm curious to see if Kirby will also follow that route or if Morrison was taking the unexplored idea to a darker extreme.
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Old 03-08-2019, 03:17 AM
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We dive even further into the world of OMAC!

Our comic begins with OMAC getting lost in a movie... a virtual reality movie! Where he imagines a super-Kirby adventure for himself.

You know, I hate in stories when the pop culture that characters enjoy, such as movies, music, video games, etc, are clearly crappy. Russian Doll was brilliant and wonderful but the fake video game in it that pops up for a few moments really takes me out of it. And at least in that show, a character basically says the game is crap.

But even worse is fake pop culture that is really lame that characters act like is awesome and inspiring.

This is NOT that case.



I want to know everything about the adventure of the talking skulls and their collosal monster. After a quick action scene, OMAC's movie is interrupted by the GPA, who let him know that he has been made a Five Star General, to which OMAC states he is "flattered". Hmm... OK, that seems like it should be an understatement but I guess maybe it doesn't mean that much when you've been a soldier all of two days. But while he is merely flattered, once the GPA are god he considered how heavy the responsibility is to essentially be the army for Global Peace. He also wonders about his lost memories.

Though the series introduces itself as a cautionary tale, I'm not exactly sure if the future Kirby is presenting is meant to be looked on with suspicion or taken at face value. That's not a complaint, though (so far). Ambiguity can do a lot for a story. Even if Kirby didn't mean to be ambiguous, the fact that he is picking up on that aspect of the character and reminding us that this is a thing he isn't just going to forget about keeps it interesting.

Anyway, then Kirby introduces a new wrinkle into OMAC's life... his new parents!



OK, before we get to that, it seems weird that while the GPA works super hard to hide ethnicity, that the different genders are VERY differently clothed. I mean, I think hiding your ethnicity for the purpose of avoiding prejudice is kind of awful, so maybe I should think "well, at least I didn't do that with gender". But also, the one woman we see is in short sleeves and in a mini-dress while the mean wear proper suits and capes. SHE DOESN'T EVEN GET A CAPE! I know Kirby means well, but this aspect seems ill considered. Unless it is a commentary on how we think we can get beyond prejudice through anonymity but we really can't.

Anyway, Mr. and Mrs. Baker have been hired on a temporary basis as OMAC's test parents, the idea being that in order to protect humanity, OMAC must know humanity. Interestingly, family-for-rent is an actual thing these days. There are places where you can hire people to play the role of your family. I actually think that could be a beautiful thing, albeit with the potential for it to be abused on both ends. But loneliness is a serious problem these days and to provide it as a service seems like it can be a good, uncynical thing. Then again, commodifying friendship is also kind of creepy. But it doesn't have to be. As you can see, I have very conflicted feelings on this. DISCUSS!

Anyway, as OMAC warmly gets to know his new family, GPA discusses how now that they provided him with a friend and family, the next order of business is getting OMAC to "stop this world from blowing up!!!!" (exactly this many exclamation marks.) OMAC then is given his mission.

Even though the world has outlawed large armies, one villain has amassed one in an unnamed nation... an army of 100,000. And OMAC must defeat it. And who is the villain responsible? Kafka! Wow, Kirby is really wearing his heart on his sleeve with this one. Interestingly, while the themes of Kafka do pop up hear (absurdity, existential anxiety, alienation). But will it really fit in. A lot of those themes are touched on lightly (except absurdity, which comes in truckloads). Kafka characters tend to be trapped and tormented by situations and conditions that are beyond the characters understanding. OMAC sort of is, but he's also greatly empowered by those powers. Here, Brother Eye and the GPA (which seems like it might be very bureaucratic) definitely provide the kind of Kafkaesque situation that OMAC sort of is in, except they also, so far, seem benign (or at least with benign intentions) while in the works of Kafka (I think, someone who has experienced Kafka beyond cultural osmosis can correct me on this). I'm curious if Brother Eye or the GPA will become more sinister as things go on. I really can see it going either way at this point and I'm curious if DC editorial changed what Kirby intended or not (worth noting, the last issue of this series was supposed to end on a big cliffhanger and Kirby had real plans for the series that never came to be due to the series cancellation forcing a sudden abrupt ending.)

Anyway, Kafka the villain, in this issue, is basically just a generic villain, despite the authoral allusion.

Anyway, the rest of the issue is wall to wall action. OMAC literally rockets into the unnamed nation.



He's soon hunted by "smart bombs ... guided by television". I have no idea what that means. My best guess is he means guided by cameras or guided by radio waves. I feel like guided by television is not a thing, except maybe a religious television review podcast.

Anyway, OMAC overcomes the bombs and faces a legion of supertanks. The destroy his rocket but OMAC has one more trick up his sleeves... BATTLE CHAIR!



And it kicks ass, first it sprays the tanks with gas that freezes all the tanks and then it freezes all the planes. Then he smashes the road and all the tanks fall in.

Enjoy.


This part is my favourite, though.



Weee!

Then OMAC takes on an infantry troop and takes them out with one Shonen Jump-style punch.



Finally it comes down to Kafka in a super tank vs. OMAC. Kafka threatens to kill OMAC but his response is "I don't count. Peace does." Nice one.

Anyway, the issue ends on a cliffhanger with OMAC trying to lift Kafka's super tank to stop him once and for all.

Looking forward to the next one!
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Old 03-08-2019, 04:49 AM
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One thing I always like seeing in Kirby comics is hundreds of dudes being punched simultaneously. Done sparingly, but often enough to be acknowledged.

OMAC does that, like, once an issue.
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Old 03-14-2019, 04:21 AM
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Of course, Animal-Vegetable-Mineral Man is no mere conqueror to be busted.
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Old 03-20-2019, 11:26 AM
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After issue after issue of action, we get a surprisingly slow, talky issue here.





We begin with a GPA agent, disguised as a regular person, reveals to OMAC a new kind of human trafficking: criminals stealing hawt young bodies to sell them to the elderly to put their stinky old brains into.



You don't need to put "run-down" in quotation marks, OMAC. We know what a run-down is. It's not code for anything.

Anyway, the good news is that none of the humans have been killed yet into order to make way for old brain, so OMAC still has time to stop the horror before it begins. And to do that, he's going to have to hunt down Fancy Freddie Sparga, super crook who looks kind of like a mod version of Derek Smalls.



But Fancy Freddy is about to make a super-hit on the GPA agent... with a missile!



Fred thinks the job done but Brother Eye used his vague magic satellite powers to protect our hero and other character with a force field. In order to buy them some time and save them some hassle, Brother Eye makes up some corpses and then zaps the room to make it looked like the missile killed them. Seems like Brother Eye might not even need OMAC since he just does... anything? But whatevs.

OMAC is lead to one of the body snatchers, Buck Blue, who is playing a hunting hologram game where he shoots monsters. When OMAC threatens to arrest him, Buck entourage tries to take out the One Man Army Corps, with predictable results. One thug says, in his defense, "I was gonna clobber yuh, but I didn't." This has gotten me out of so many parking tickets, then into many jail cells. But OMAC would rather just fucking ruin this punk.



I have to admit, that's a pretty good line.

Anyway, OMAC coerces Buck into leading him to Freddy and Buck reluctantly agrees. OMAC tries to get Buck to feel an inkling of sympathy for the people he hurt, but Buck's just awful. When they get to Freddy's, Buck learns his girlfriend is among the people who's brains will be scooped out. OMAC arrives to arrest everyone and Buck is pissed... until Freddy says "I can give you a lot of money for her" and Buck does an about face. OMAC is understandably disgusted and Buck is like "You don't know what it's like out there, MAN!" OMAC isn't moved and it's hard to blame him considering what the jerks an accessory to. But OMAC needs him alive and tells him that while the Cabal will definitely kill him for his betrayal, OMAC won't. See, Buck also knows, literally, where the bodies are buried (ALIVE, THAT IS) and will need his help to free them from... THE BODY BANK!

TO BE CONTINUED!

The funny thing is I feel like this is hinting at something I want this series to get at. In the first issue, OMAC says "I want to save humanity from itself". That sounds like it should be about breaking down the awful systems we put in place but really, it's just been criminals and dictators. Buck's story hints that the streets are a hard place, blah blah blah and that as awful as he is, he's got a redemption story coming the next issue (or at least a "giving up on becoming a complete dick" story). But while scrapes the surface the tiniest bit, I feel like it takes too long to say not a lot and it does something I'm surprised that this series would do: skimp on the action. Hopefully part two will take care of that.
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Old 03-25-2019, 10:26 AM
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Last issue was a bit action light but here we get some so much action, it's... a lot. Sorry, no room for something clever, too much action.


Page one, guess what MONSTER!



THEN MONSTER FIGHT!



OMAC beats them and learns that these are the "sickies", humans who have been turned into mutants by the mob to be guards to the Body Bank.

In case you forgot the last issue, OMAC is stopping a scheme to kidnap innocent people and pop out there brains and put the minds of rich old people in them. Buck Blue, one of the kidnappers, has been shanghaied into OMAC's mission and drug along against his will. Buck is now reluctantly leading OMAC to the body bank, where the young people of today are being kept fresh and alive.

OMAC gets a power up from Brother Eye before planning to commandeer a "gang train" which kidnappers use to transport their victims. OMAC beats up some crooks and saves a woman before they can board the train. The train... looks awesome.



This is like the face of the best transformer there never was, hewn of gold and divine energy. CHOO-CHOO! Buck Blue is all like "Well, you don't need me anymore." but OMAC suspects otherwise. Sure enough, the train is boobytrapped with poison gas for non-personnel. OMAC destroys the gas dispenser and breaks a whole in the side of the train to drain the poison. Then the baddies realize that the wrong dudes are on the train and alive, they try to blow it up. But OMAC survives because apparently Brother Eye is a literally Deus Ex Machina (Deus Quod Machina?) and stops the main train car from boomin' up and when the baddies open fire on it, a big rock comes out. OMAC and Buck bust out of it and OMAC reveals it's a molecular cocoon (aren't all cocoons made of molecules?) and then beats the crap out of the bad guys.

Finally, OMAC makes it to the Body Bank. After beating up the last of the baddies, Buck tries to betray one last time but realizes he has no chance against OMAC and the GPA, who just showed up and gives up peacefully. Buck asks OMAC "You 'law and order' types are big heroes.. but what does that do for me?" OMAC reveals it saved the girlfriend he was going to sell out and says despite everything, Buck did actually help save her. Buck is more realistic though, noting it was more to save his own neck and asking what she will think about that. OMAC says "I don't know... but you will and she will."

The end.

This is a fun issue on it's own and it comes close a few times to being the series I want. The idea of the sickies literally and figuratively turning themselves into monsters and the fact that Buck is aware of his own selfishness ties in a bit to the idea this is a corrupted world. I don't think Buck is going to hang around, but there is potential in keeping him on the cast as a sort of Huggie Bear informant type who can come to realize that his world becomes better when he isn't simply thinking "look out for #1" and seeing the value of caring for others. The idea that the sickies will dehumanize themselves into monsters to get money is kind of interesting... but it also doesn't make sense. Can they turn back after a while? If they can never leave, how cn they use their money? Or is the money for someone they love and they turn themselves into monsters for them?

The sickies are potentially really interesting but I think, like Buck, they could have an interesting arc of learning what it means to be human after losing their physical humanity. With two issues to go, I doubt we'll get to any of that, though. But at least in the next issue, someone steals the Earth's water!
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Old 03-25-2019, 10:59 AM
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Kind of get the feeling that Jack had lots of ideas for OMAC that he didn’t get time to flesh out properly.

Which defines a lot of his DC output, sadly.
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  #13  
Old 03-27-2019, 09:40 AM
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Johnny Unusual Johnny Unusual is online now
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This one is a more conventional superhero adventure in basic premise but there's a lot of good stuff here... including a killer cliffhanger.


We begin with OMAC investigating a lake that's been completely dehydrated.



Suddenly, OMAC finds a strange box sinking into the sand. Trying to pick it up, he discovers that is is ridiculously heavy. In order to recover it, Brother Eye super charges him like never before...



OMAC falls unconscious as he recovers it and even it hitting the ground causes the nearby landscape to shudder. Just as OMAC states he knows what the box is, cut too...



Yep, the box was the totality of water and moisture from the lake itself! And who is behind this plot... the supervillain Doctor Skuba! Along with his comely daughter Seaweed and her hunky boyfriend Apollo, Skuba's planning to steal all the world's water and hold it hostage. Of course, the cover promises the water just getting sucked up like in that one Calvin and Hobbes strip.



Instead, Skuba is dropping boxes in bodies of water that compress them into insanely dense boxes. And his next plan is to steal the Atlantic Ocean!



After healing up, OMAC hunts down Skuba and finds him on a mysterious island. Seaweed, who is into this musclebound stranger, is curious about him. Skuba is too, but for far more scientific reasons. He realizes that he's been augmented by science and uses a weapon to affect him from afar, which results in...



Great cliffhanger. We haven't seen Blank since issue one and he didn't have a choice to become OMAC. The series made some small efforts to deal with OMAC's struggle with the fact that he can't remember Blank. It's not just that OMAC is in dire straights, but also bringing in Buddy has all sorts of dramatic potential.

Next time: The Last Issue! DON'T MISS IT!
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