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  #31  
Old 03-18-2011, 08:18 AM
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I once wrote a thoroughly ridiculous theme song for a game a friend and I were making (that we never made). I was quite proud of it until the opening motif showed up, interval for interval, as the opening motif of Stephen Colbert's theme song. Even though I wrote it like three years before that show premiered I can't show it to anyone without it looking like I just ripped that bit off.

Not that it matters, really, because it's thoroughly ridiculous, as I said.
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  #32  
Old 05-26-2011, 08:48 PM
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Anyone have an open-source sequencer to recommend, preferably with a piano roll mode?
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  #33  
Old 05-30-2011, 09:14 PM
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I need some advice for online, print-it-yourself books. Helen wants to print up ~5 copies of her finished Master's Thesis and is trying to find a good online place to do it. We've looked at Lulu and Blurb. From what we could see, Blurb assumes you are doing full color and charges accordingly, while Helen just wants to do black and white. So, Lulu looks like our best bet so far, but I was hoping to hear what other people's experiences have been.
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  #34  
Old 05-31-2011, 03:58 PM
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Originally Posted by eternaljwh View Post
Anyone have an open-source sequencer to recommend, preferably with a piano roll mode?
No piano roll mode sadly, but if you want a few open-source sequencers --
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  #35  
Old 06-16-2011, 01:09 PM
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Originally Posted by bobbywatson View Post
I've been able to use a graphic tablet with GIMP in the past. It worked flawlessly on the Mac, but I've always had issues in Windows (mostly with the offset: I would click on the drawing and the line would appear somewhere else. Quite annoying.) I can't remember if I have tried Linux or not.
HEY YOU I HAD THE SAME PROBLEM I FIXED IT LET ME TELL YOU HOW

I had the SAME gripe, actually, but I was googling another big tablet issue (my lines always come out shaky, SUPER SHAKY, like I'm drawing on the back of a speeding truck and also super drunk and also super palsy and also having an epileptic seizure kind of shaky), but I found out that there's a setting in Windows that will TOTALLY FIX THE PROBLEM YOU AND I HAD.

Wacoms, or at least this Bamboo one which I guess we both have, are automatically set to pen mode (in Windows at least, maybe not Macs, maybe that's the difference). So, basically, where you hit the pen on your tablet roughly corresponds with where it shows up on the screen - is the way I understand it. That's really not an issue with a tablet screen, since you'd be hitting where you want to draw anyway, but if you're using a tablet peripheral, this means the cursor is going to look like it's bouncing all over the place when you pick it up for any reason. Some people are okay with this, and I'm sure you'd get used to it with practice buuuuuut the superior tablet option is mouse mode! This means that whenever the pen leaves the tablet, and then is placed back onto the pad, the cursor will pick up where you left off, not somewhere else.

I can, with like 98% certainty, say that this will fix your problem. I'm not sure where it would be otherwise - maybe the same place - but in Windows 7, I went to Control Panel > Bamboo > Mouse Mode.

If anyone's having problems with wobbly lines, let me mention real quick that I found out that Wacoms are sensitive to other devices' outputs (and they have to be, by regulation, or at least they cannot be manufactured to interfere or block). So, I had the tablet smooshed in between the monitor and the case, and when I scooted the monitor way, way back, and scooched the tablet close to me, so there was a gap of one-two feet between my tablet and the other gadgets, my problem improved greatly. Unfortunately, routers can and do disrupt the signal, sooo, if it's still a big issue, you may want to try unplugging it while you work.
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  #36  
Old 09-05-2011, 03:17 PM
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Default Random thoughts on drawing

I did not know where to put this. I thought this thread would probably get more traffic than my own thread, so here it is. Not sure exactly what I am expecting from this, but we'll see. Hopefully someone smarter than me will have ideas! And while in my case this post applies to drawing, I believe it can be used for most artistic endeavours. Or cooking. Or work. Pretty much anything, actually.

I guess this is mostly directed toward those on this board who have "mastered" the art of drawing. (By "mastered", I mean who are professional artists, or have published art somewhere. I am aware of the fact that drawing can never actually be completely "mastered". )

Here's the question: how did you manage to get to that level? How do you keep the motivation level high?

My current dilemma: I like drawing. Always have. I've been somewhat serious about it ever since high school. (My first career choice was comic book artist, but my parents did a pretty good job of steering me away from it.) I would rate my current level as "not bad". I want to think that what I can currently do is better than what most people can achieve. But it's nowhere near as good as I would like it to be. I actually gave up on ever becoming "good" at it at some point in my life, and looking back at it now, it feels like the biggest mistake I've ever made.

Which brings me back to the question: how do you go from being "not bad" to being "good"? The obvious answer is "observe and practice". From what I understand, this "observe and practice" almost needs to become an obsession (or something closer to a second job) if one wants to achieve a reasonable level. But in doing so, I'm wondering: Does the fun that one gets out of drawing not go away? And if it does, does it eventually come back?
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  #37  
Old 09-05-2011, 04:33 PM
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I don't know anything about drawing (I tried, I failed), but I do know lots about music and yes, getting good at something involves daily practice and a focused attempt to always be improving. You should always be working on something just above the level of what you're capable of, so that you will continue to grow.

Does it ever stop being fun? Perhaps, sometimes, temporarily. Never for me, but I'm sure it happens to some people. However, in my experience the better you get at the thing you love the more fun it becomes, because with greater levels of skill come more opportunities to do awesome things.
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  #38  
Old 09-09-2011, 12:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbywatson View Post
Here's the question: how did you manage to get to that level? How do you keep the motivation level high?

how do you go from being "not bad" to being "good"? The obvious answer is "observe and practice". From what I understand, this "observe and practice" almost needs to become an obsession (or something closer to a second job) if one wants to achieve a reasonable level. But in doing so, I'm wondering: Does the fun that one gets out of drawing not go away? And if it does, does it eventually come back?
Yeah you pretty much have it with the "observe and practice" but I think that's really simplified and de-humanized and anyone who says that isn't really telling you anything. Everyone has their own growth processes, and they change over time as well. You need to be able to understand yourself to trigger the desire to create.

For instance, my art making patterns have been:

Early, age 7-18: Practice drawing for hours everyday while in classes as an escape from boredom. Draw only once a week or so at home. Linear improvement on very focused themes and subjects that were practiced.

Mid, age 18-23: Create during prescribed studio class times and in between classes. Ingrained processes and materials are irrelevent or attacked by instructors actively. Sketchbooks are rich, but finished artwork is much worse, even though a lot is produced in a great variety of media, most of it is a dead-end.

Late, age 23-27: Settled in to a pattern of synthesis and creation, phases becoming more compressed as time goes on. During a period of artistic non-productivity I still pay attention, journal, read books, research etc. until the pressure to create overwhelms the relaxed state. Then there is a period of prolific art making usually inspired by some of these new ideas. The first such cycle after graduating took maybe 9 months! The most recent was 3 weeks.

I don't know if this helps but I believe understanding how you grow is paramount to cultivating a skill, and everyone is different. When I was in 7th grade I went through probably my first "down" cycle where nothing was turning out right and I didn't have the patience to see a drawing through. I panicked. I cried. In public. On a bus full full of my classmates on a 5 hour drive for a 3 day stay at Wolf Ridge Environmental Learning Center. Good times. But a couple weeks later when I picked up the pencil again It was amazing. I was drawing better than ever. I guess one expects their skills to atrophy when they aren't used, but your brain is always learning and synthesizing. Now I don't panic when every drawing I start goes to crap. I know what's happening, it's just a part of how I learn. So I use that time to look at art, watch movies, read, etc. to enrich it.

I think it's valuable to be able to analyze your own history thus, maybe it will help you identify the patterns art creates in your life. The reassuring thing: you will never get worse at art as you get older. The rust can be knocked off in days, if not hours, meanwhile you're fortified by every experience you have, and every minute your brain is alive.

Now all that is about things you can't decide. You are stuck with yourself after all. What you can decide to do is take risks. Draw something you don't think you can draw. Draw something that doesn't exist until it looks like it could. Paint with something weird. Spend 100 hours making something that might fail. Make a thing you think is boring into something that isn't. Make what you want and screw "the audience".

The other decisions you have to make regard materials and processes. You need to seek out the best for what your needs are. It doesn't mean the most expensive, it just means the right ones. That "middle era" where I was in art school generally sucked aside from the fact that I was forced to experiment with a lot of tools I wouldn't have considered before then. Maybe if I didn't I would still be doing pencil drawings with watercolor and that's all. I made some great, weird, wild watercolors at the end of highschool, but I'm glad I tried so much more since. Now I use all that, and gouache, acrylic, markers, inks, printmaking, digital paint, collage and photomontage. There's also an enormous amount of materials I just gave away because I didn't like them. When you go to the art supply store, pick up something new, in addition to all the refills and such you already know you like.

Anyway, your questions brought up a lot of thoughts I didn't know I had at the moment. I hope this sheds some light on the quest to be "good". I'm still on it myself, so I would love to hear some other people's experiences.
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  #39  
Old 09-09-2011, 05:04 PM
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I used to think that I wanted to draw for a living, but I admitted to myself that I didn't care enough to practice. So I just do it for fun.
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  #40  
Old 09-21-2012, 11:54 AM
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Here I am, reviving another thread... Oh well...

Anyway, this is probably more of a technical question.

Let me start with a bit of history: I moved into my house two years ago. There is a wall in here that is very high (like, 14 feet high or something) and, well, it's empty and boring. I looked in home decoration stores for something to put on it, but all the paintings I found were either bland, boring or flowers.

Since I could not find anything that I actually wanted to put on the wall, I started thinking "Hey, I could do the paintings myself!" It turned out that's not exactly practical: I like drawing, but painting is not really my thing (I gave it a shot, I've got canvases with paint on it to prove it). (Maybe acrylic colors would be a better choice for me, but I'm not sure I want to try it.)

Anyway, fast-forward to today: I actually have an idea of what I want to put on that wall (two different images, one of them featuring female characters, one of them featuring male characters, both taking place in something similar to antiquity's public baths, with mostly warm colors, a width of 12 inches and a height of 36 inches). I have already started working on one of them (the one featuring women).

What I plan to do is this: draw the characters by hand, scan them at high resolution, and then assemble and paint everything in GIMP. Once the work is done, my idea is to have it printed on actual canvases and have them framed.

Now, here are the technical questions:
  • What's a good resolution to work with? I'm thinking 600 DPI is enough, but feel free to tell me I'm wrong
  • What about color profiles? I believe there is some basic support for the CYMK color model in GIMP, but I'm pretty sure that this support is nothing compared to Photoshop's. I just don't want to spend all that time on the image and then see it come out looking like crap after it's printed.
  • Printing on canvas: I know there is at least one place in town that does it, and there might be more. Now, how about durability of the color? Granted, the wall where I want to put the canvases does not see a lot of sunshine, so that would probably help preserve the color. Even so, is this a technique that can produce nice results? Or should I just forget about the whole thing because, wherever I get it printed, it will look like crap?

(Also, if anyone is curious, I will probably put samples in my thread as the images move forward.)

Last edited by bobbywatson; 09-21-2012 at 01:31 PM. Reason: Fixed typo.
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  #41  
Old 09-21-2012, 12:48 PM
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300dpi is adequate for print. 600dpi is only necessary for extremely fine lineart or rasterized type situations.

If you can set color profiles in GIMP before you start working it should be fine. You could always move to photoshop later if you need to do a lot of color profile work. I don't think you'll need to. And switching from RGB to CMYK will probably not change too much unless you're working with really saturated colors, which it doesn't sound like you will be.

Digital prints these days tend to last pretty long. If you have it under glass and not exposed to direct light it will probably hold up 50+ years minimum. The most likely reason for a print turning out like crap is that your screen is going to be way off from theirs, and their screens are matched to their printers. I would recommend going to a place that serves design and marketing firms and artists, not just any copy-shop that can print on canvas unless they're willing to print samples or redo it if it looks crap.

Also, I will vouch for acrylics. Oil paints take an immense period of time to do good work with unless you want to introduce even more toxic driers and lacquers. Most oil painters these days do that, because the alternative is waiting weeks or even months before you work on leaner layers and glazes. Another trend these days is really 'unfinished' oil paintings with a lot of canvas showing and primarily thin glazes and linear elements. I believe this is also influenced by time pressure to some extent.

Acrylic paints will operate in a much more familiar manner (to working digital) and with the many various additives can do some gorgeous stuff. I recommend Golden Acrylic brand.

And if you are considering doing some more painting, consider panels. Canvas painting was invented because wood panels and murals tended to hold up terribly in humid Mediterranean climates, but it became the default substrate for some reason. The amount of control you get on a panel is a lot greater if that's what you're looking for.
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  #42  
Old 09-21-2012, 01:29 PM
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My father is about to start working with acrylics. I might give it a try at some point.

Thank you very, very much for your advice! As always, it is much appreciated!
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  #43  
Old 10-16-2012, 10:26 PM
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Thread revival with a technical issue:

I'm looking to put together some slideshow videos with my own scripted commentary, and then upload them to Youtube.

That's the long-term goal, but right now I can't even take that first step because I just don't have any working knowledge of the kind of software that's right for the job. I've been poking and prodding around in Windows Movie Maker and it just overwhelms me that I can't do something as simple as, say, putting two images side by side in a frame, and calling that one slide. It seems I can only have one image per slide, stretched out into fullscreen pixelation. It's more than a little deflating.

I can't think of a better example of what my long-term goal looks like than this.

I hear Audacity is the perfect place to get started for sound recording. What slideshow software does it play nice with? I'm willing to accept that the probable answer to all of these questions and more is "Buy a Mac."

Thanks in advance.
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  #44  
Old 10-16-2012, 11:20 PM
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Any reason you can't composite things side by side in a regular ol' art program in advance?
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  #45  
Old 10-17-2012, 04:10 AM
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When this thread got bumped, I wondered whatever happened to Bobby's wall. Bobby?
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  #46  
Old 10-17-2012, 09:54 AM
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Working on it.

I encountered an issue with my computer: it did not have enough RAM to properly handle the size of the image. It now has 16 GB, which should be enough. (I also considered installing an SSD, but the computer is a Mac mini and I'm not a big fan of doing complicated surgery on the thing.)

I did some more work on the female figures, spent some of last week working on the architecture in Sketchup. I am currently in the process of reorganizing some rooms in my house, and that includes moving my drawing table.

In short: it's nowhere near done, but it's moving forward slowly. The fact that I was away on business for a while did not help.
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  #47  
Old 10-17-2012, 09:46 PM
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Alastor, PowerPoint 2010 (mac) seems to have a Save as Movie option (.mov). OpenOffice has an option for Flash in its Export menu. Those might be easier to wrangle than Windows Movie Maker (which was what ultimately killed any desire of mine to create AMVs when I was young and impressionable)
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  #48  
Old 10-17-2012, 09:48 PM
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Yeah, I was thinking something along those lines. It occurred to me that I can't do with Windows Movie Maker today what I could easily do with PowerPoint several years ago.
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  #49  
Old 10-25-2012, 09:28 PM
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What about one of those clear plastic pockets with the three-ring holes in them?
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  #50  
Old 10-26-2012, 08:34 AM
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That was my first thought, but if it's one of those wire bound sketchbooks, you probably won't be able to do that.

what about a bunch of stamp hinges?
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  #51  
Old 10-26-2012, 10:15 AM
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Default No one asked for a discussion of audio recording hardware, but here it is

I've been completely geeking out over sound recording hardware lately, which is total fun, if somewhat dangerous for the budget. It started when I decided to buy a new microphone for podcasting, inspired by the Idle Thumbs guys' discussion of their setup during the ruinationcast. I didn't wind up getting the mic that they use, mostly because I couldn't find it at a place with a good return policy, but instead I wound up getting a pair of MXL microphones in fire engine red. Cheap microphones made in China have made enormous strides over the last few years and it's now possible to get great-sounding mics at prices that would have been completely impossible 15 years ago. I took a chance on these, since it isn't easy to find reviews for cheap microphones, but it would be hard to not get my money's worth considering what I paid for them. They arrived last night and I had the chance to try podcasting with the 550, which was nice, but my the sound of my s's seemed a bit exaggerated. That could be the fault of my office, though, which is far from having great acoustics.

In order to take care of that problem, I stopped by Solotech and picked up some foam wedges to put up on my walls. You can get Auralex wedgies for about $6 a square foot - kind of expensive, but this is some good stuff and I don't need much of it. I'm hoping to get around to installing them on the wall that is behind my back when I use my computer, since it's a big flat space with nothing to break up the reflections and I think it's what's causing most of the unwanted reverb in the room. As a big audio nerd, I'm looking forward to having acoustic wedges on my walls just from a decorative standpoint! We'll see how well they work in a day or two.

While I was looking around Solotech, I happened to spot a pretty sweet-looking audio interface for recording to PC. The M Audio c600 is a very slick looking interface with 4 XLR inputs (with preamps) that also supports multiple speaker-outs and 2 or 3 different headphone mixes, depending on how you set them up. As a bonus, it has physical controls for your recording software, and nothing makes me geek out more than dedicated hardware for controlling a specific piece of software. Despite my ravings, the c600 is still an entry-level piece of gear. The biggest draw for me is that it would increase the number of simultaneous inputs I can record from 2 to 4 at a pretty reasonable price - it's $400 locally (already not too bad for this kind of thing), but you can get it for a paltry $230 on Amazon.com, which is a fantastic price. That's cheap enough that it dulls my worries of wasting money on an intermediate-sized interface, rather than going straight to something that supports 8 tracks. Because honestly, the number of times when I'll really need more than 4 simultaneous inputs in my life is pretty dang small. And maybe I could even jury rig something together using my old Mbox to get a total of 6, although that could involve some major headaches as I try to figure out the ASIO driver configuration. Anyway, I'm going to think about it for a little bit, but after reading some positive reviews on the c600, I'm starting to feel awfully tempted. Maybe I can convince someone to get me one for Christmas? Either way, I'll have to come up with some cool reason to use this stuff, because I haven't exactly been doing a ton of recording lately. But it sure would be fun...
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  #52  
Old 10-26-2012, 10:36 AM
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I forgot my main sketchbook on my trip to APE, and so had to borrow one of Jeremy's to get con sketches during the show. However, Jeremy's is a bit taller and wider than my main one, and a few of the artists used the entire page. I could pretty easily tear out the pages of the old one to mount them into the new, but does anyone have any suggestions for how to this gracefully? I don't want to just tape them to the new pages or (god forbid) slather some glue on there.
You could use a "T-hinge" of tape. Basically one piece of tape (sticky side down) crosses the top of a second piece of tape (sticky side up) forming a T shape. The vertical part of the T is the sticky-side-up. Put it near the center-top of your sketchbook page. Put your loose paper on top.

It's just a simple connection that is pretty light and repositionable, and it lets the paper change size and shape with humidity and temperature without wrinkling etc. I would recommend artists or linen tapes, but if you don't care about the tape becoming brittle or yellowing the paper years and years down the road then you can use whatever type you please.

You could also tack it with just a dot of acrylic medium of wheat/rice paste near the center. (Elmers glue counts).
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  #53  
Old 01-24-2013, 07:34 AM
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If you don't mind me asking, what paint tool do you use?

I bought a Bamboo tablet a while back, when I actually had money to spare for crap like that, and I wasn't sure if the ArtRage software that came bundled with it would be a good place to start, or if there's something else out there that's even more intuitive.

I like to use a lot of simple shapes and what have you for structural underpinning, and ArtRage doesn't seem to have an easy way to just make a circle when I want to make a circle, so I have to just go into MS Paint or something to even do that. I know ArtRage has stencil tools for making basic shapes, but something about the interface there just feels....needlessly clumsy.

But hey, I'm not asking for a tutorial, here. Just if there's something out there that's easier to use.

Worst comes to worst, I could just relearn Photoshop.
Crossposted from Chu's thread about Chu things, because I'm just looking of options in general here.
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  #54  
Old 01-31-2013, 10:40 AM
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I guess it you really need perfect shapes then just used Photoshop or Paint.net (free, has a lot of the same basic functions as photoshop re: selections and layers). But honestly if you're serious about art you should learn how to draw geometric forms freehand. Try getting as close as possible just blocking all the shapes in with big brushes and then push and pull the edges with more paint and erasing. Then you're really painting.

I usually start with Artrage, jump to Photoshop at some point for some finely controlled transparency, color/contrast stuff, and photomontage, then hop back into Artrage ad finish there. I really like Artrage for generally not requiring a lot of hotkey business but that's because I have a tablet computer and I get a lot more work done if I can lounge on a comfy chair or couch instead of having to sit upright at a desk with one hand on the keyboard.
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  #55  
Old 01-31-2013, 07:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Traumadore View Post
I guess it you really need perfect shapes then just used Photoshop or Paint.net (free, has a lot of the same basic functions as photoshop re: selections and layers). But honestly if you're serious about art you should learn how to draw geometric forms freehand. Try getting as close as possible just blocking all the shapes in with big brushes and then push and pull the edges with more paint and erasing. Then you're really painting.
Thanks for the advice! And yeah, I can see how relying on shape tools to do my work for me could become a crutch that just winds up holding me back in the long run. I tend to rely on stuff like that because I have a pretty nasty combination of perfectionism and not really knowing what the hell I'm doing yet. Like, even if it's just pencil and paper stuff, I'll grab a quarter or an old CD or Pog or something just so I can have those Perfect Circles to base my work around. I can definitely see how that would be something I should try to get out of.

Quote:
I usually start with Artrage, jump to Photoshop at some point for some finely controlled transparency, color/contrast stuff, and photomontage, then hop back into Artrage ad finish there. I really like Artrage for generally not requiring a lot of hotkey business but that's because I have a tablet computer and I get a lot more work done if I can lounge on a comfy chair or couch instead of having to sit upright at a desk with one hand on the keyboard.
Yeah, with what I've got to work with at the moment, that definitely sounds like the way to go. I really like how Artrage manages to emulate the actual look of different media so well (at least from what I've seen of it), and I'm much more used to how Photoshop handles effects and such (though I'm rusty as all get out there). My rig's just a Bamboo tablet hooked up to a plain old laptop, so not being able to just look down at the thing I'm scribbling on will take some getting used to. Definitely an odd sense of disconnect there. Hopefully that'll be nothing some practice can't fix, though.

(That reminds me, I still need to give SAItools a spin at some point. )
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  #56  
Old 02-01-2013, 01:36 PM
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At least get a compass so you can make the exact size circle you want, ha. There's nothing wrong with precision if your creative content demands geometric perfection. It all depends on what you're trying to draw or paint. Learning freehand skills is going to save you a lot of time though. You need to have a sketch (i.e. plan) before breaking out the proverbial t-square and triangles, otherwise you'll make your perfect lines and then feel pretty defeated halfway through when you realize the composition or structure is a little off and you've got to shift all that stuff around.

If you are doing highly geometric work, I can't really recommend anything less than Adobe Illustrator. The ironically named software that almost no illustrators use! It's specifically for designer types to make things that look like they could almost be art if you squint. Just kidding I've seen some decent stuff come out of it, you should give it a try at least.
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Old 02-02-2013, 09:30 AM
Guild Guild is offline
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Honk honk!
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Old 02-02-2013, 11:23 PM
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Isrieri Isrieri is offline
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So I'm trying to make an RPG in two weeks for a contest over at RMN, and this is my first experience trying to write dialogue with very limited room. Its like, you only get 2-3 sentences per textbox before you have to make a new one. This is going to suck since my left index finger is out of commission for a while.

Wondering if I should just type up a draft of the game's dialogue first. No idea how to write something like that though. In the form of a screenplay maybe?
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Old 02-03-2013, 12:34 PM
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Kirin Kirin is online now
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Oh hey, so somebody bumping the Holiday Card Swap reminded me I did a sort of creative thing for it, and was holding off on posting it anywhere so as not to ruin the random surprises:


(click for big)
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Old 02-03-2013, 12:58 PM
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That Old Chestnut That Old Chestnut is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Traumadore View Post
If you are doing highly geometric work, I can't really recommend anything less than Adobe Illustrator. The ironically named software that almost no illustrators use! It's specifically for designer types to make things that look like they could almost be art if you squint. Just kidding I've seen some decent stuff come out of it, you should give it a try at least.
Ha ha nah, my stuff is mostly on the cartoony side. I'm probably just being super anal about something I have no business being anal about. For what I'm wanting to do, it's starting to sound like freehand is the way to go here.

Thanks again!

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Originally Posted by Guild View Post
Honk honk!
Hey, I'm walkin' here!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Isrieri View Post
Wondering if I should just type up a draft of the game's dialogue first. No idea how to write something like that though. In the form of a screenplay maybe?
Yeah, screenplay definitely sounds like the way to go.
(I have way more experience hashin' out dialogue between silly hypothetical video game characters than any grown man should.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kirin View Post
Oh hey, so somebody bumping the Holiday Card Swap reminded me I did a sort of creative thing for it, and was holding off on posting it anywhere so as not to ruin the random surprises:


(click for big)
He he he! I think my favorite's the Fear one.

DON'T BE SCARED LADY! THEY JUST WANT TO GREET YOUR SEASONS OR WHATEVER!
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