The Return of Talking Time

Go Back   The Return of Talking Time > Talking about other things > Talking about sports

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-05-2017, 08:20 AM
Solitayre's Avatar
Solitayre Solitayre is offline
Not much of a donkey
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Michigan
Pronouns: He/Him
Posts: 9,112
Default Talking About Martial Arts

A couple months ago, a doctor told me I most likely have arthritis in my knee. This wasn't a terrible shock; it had hurt constantly for about six months, especially when sitting/standing, and arthritis of the knee runs in my family. I had a pretty good idea what was going on.

I needed some kind of rehabilitation so I started doing some research. I learned that Tai Chi was considered really good for people with arthritis; not only is it low impact but since it strengthens a lot of muscle groups to help support you it can actually helps reduce a lot of the stress and weight on your joints. So I found a class and started taking it.

I've only been taking it a few weeks so I'm not going to be in any shape to fight anybody any time soon, but I have already noticed a pretty pronounced improvement in my knee. A big focus of the class is learning how to activate and strengthen the leg muscles to take the stress off of your knees. Maybe its the placebo effect or maybe I was just in really dire need of some form of physical activity, but it really seems to be working for me so far.

Anybody else ever taken martial arts? Stuff like sword-fighting/fencing totally counts.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-05-2017, 08:50 AM
Ample Vigour's Avatar
Ample Vigour Ample Vigour is offline
S*xual Tyrannosaurus
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 23,605
Default

Paul is big into HEMA and used to do judo. I do BJJ and a spot of judo on the side, and used to box hardcore. I want to say Galadrome does no-gi grappling and Silentsnake is like a purple belt in BJJ too. BEAT is a TKD black belt, I think.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-05-2017, 08:53 AM
Vaeran's Avatar
Vaeran Vaeran is online now
whatever it takes
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Philadelphia
Pronouns: he/him
Posts: 8,105
Default

I took a judo class in fourth grade. Turns out they don't teach Burning Fist of the Death Lotus to fourth graders though, so I stopped going.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-05-2017, 09:40 AM
BEAT's Avatar
BEAT BEAT is online now
SEARING RED GAZE
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: SKELETON HELL.
Pronouns: DUDE/BRO
Posts: 24,323
Default

Ample Vigour is correct, I'm a 3rd Dan Black Belt in Tae Kwon Do.

TKD gets a bad rap for being a Martial Art that's mostly taught at shopping centers and churches to children aged 6 to 14, and for being basically useless in a "real" fight. I won't say that's not the case, because that is 100% abso-fucking-lutely the case.

And that's why I love it.

Volunteering at my church by teaching kids how to kick and making them do push-ups for not yelling loud enough is one of the best things I've ever done with my life. It's a way to teach children the importance of exercise, practice, sportsmanship and discipline in a positive environment that, while stern, still allows them to be children. Yeah, the rigid formal stances and exaggerated blocks aren't gonna be winning any street fights, which is why the first point we hammered into their heads was the importance of NOT GETTING INTO FIGHTS. It's also one of the few "sports" where parents are encouraged to join along with their kids instead of just sitting on the sideline for an hour 3 times a week.

Some of the kids just stuck around long enough to get their green belt. Some stuck around to Black and became volunteer instructors themselves. A few went on to study other martial arts. A few of em even started practicing MMA.

It's a dopey, beginner level Martial art that should absolutely not be put in the same category as serious stuff like BJJ or Boxing. But that's okay. The niche it fills and what it allowed me to do because it's not as serious is well, important!

TKD is good.

Last edited by BEAT; 10-05-2017 at 12:17 PM. Reason: TYPOS LOL
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-05-2017, 09:41 AM
Zef's Avatar
Zef Zef is online now
Find Your Reason
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: The Vortex World
Posts: 31,062
Default

We had a sifu at my campus during high school and college; he started out teaching us Tai Chi in the mornings as physical exercise first, with a focus on proper form and balance. Then, depending on personal aptitude, he'd switch our individual routines from "Tai Chi" to Taijiquan and also offer Kung fu/Wushu in the evenings.

What struck me most about Tai Chi/Taijiquan (pun actually not intended) was how versatile an activity it is, from low-impact therapy to an actually pretty frightening martial art. One of my favorite go-to examples of this is the Cloud Hands motion, which looks very soft and gentle but is actually meant to break an attacker's elbow and bend it backwards The various Crawling Snake motions in both Taijiquan and Nanquan were a favorite of our group, and made us point out just how many genital strikes the Chinese devised, barehanded and armed.

For Taijiquan, we practiced the traditional Yang style (which got an update or two in the following years) in its three tournament forms and two weapons forms, but I didn't have the chance to advance to the Staff form before graduation. I was particularly proud of my Form 48 and Sword Form 32, and got a silver and a gold for 48 at two tournaments and a gold for a team presentation of SF32. Taijiquan, when learned as a full-on martial art, was exhausting; it really builds up the leg muscles, and demands a lot of balance and flexibility. Archer stances are just very well-planted lunges, but holding Horse and Half-Step stances at formal tournament height/extension/duration is murder on your adductors, glutes, and quads. They really DO help strengthen your thighs and calves to alleviate the direct stress on knees and ankles, even if you do the "therapy" version of Tai Chi, and I've seen both very slim masters dipping ridiculously low in their Horses as well as thunder-thigh students doing head-height heel kicks and hold them there for hours.

(Even though it's been over 15 years since, I still attribute my inability to fit into skinny jeans to the six years of Taijiquan I took back then )

To compensate, we would occasionally do Quigong and Pushing-Hands exercises at the end of the class to let our muscles rest. Amusingly, those of us in the Wushu class would do Taijiquan at the end to re-center, even if our legs and shoulders were burning from the formal class. After an hour of doing very explosive Nanquan, of jumping and spinning all over the place with Changquan, or practicing our Shaolin forms, holding a measly Half-step stance in the extremely basic Repelling Monkey motion was torture.

I keep looking up opportunities to practice again, but other than "morning therapy" sessions at the park every Sunday morning, there's very few teachers in the greater Boston area :/ I really want to catch up, as my Form 24 is rusty enough, but Forms 48 and 42 have all but vanished from my muscle memory. I do have a video tape of one of our tournaments, and I could refer to it if I could find the tape again, but transferring that to a more permanent format is a huge hassle.

Other than those, I got up to a yellow belt in Shotokan Karate-do in 9th grade, and I did a semester of Tae Kwon Do in HS before the Tai Chi sifu was hired. Even if I regain my flexibility, my aptitude is more towards upper-body techniques than kicks, so Chinese schools offer more options to me than Japanese or Korean ones. I'd love to try my hand at Aikido and Jeet Kune Do, though, and I'm always absolutely dazzled by Capoeira. If I had my pick of schools and styles, though, I'd REALLY love to go back to Taijiquan Chi'en and Staff forms. I LOVE staff fighting. It's how I got a scar on my shoulder!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-05-2017, 09:41 AM
BEAT's Avatar
BEAT BEAT is online now
SEARING RED GAZE
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: SKELETON HELL.
Pronouns: DUDE/BRO
Posts: 24,323
Default SERIOUSLY, FUCK MCDOJOS. NOT-FOR-PROFIT SCHOOLS ALL THE WAY.

Fuck McDojos with their expensive "Black belt programs" that literally just mean charging twice as much for a gaudy-ass Dobok* tho.

*Korean equivalent of a Gi, basically.

Last edited by BEAT; 10-05-2017 at 03:06 PM. Reason: I WON'T HATE YOU FOR TEACHING MARTIAL ARTS FOR A LIVING, BUT I GOT NOTHING NICE TO SAY ABOUT CLASSES SORTED INTO UNIFORM COLORS BASED ON HOW MUCH MONEY THEIR PARENTS HAVE.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-05-2017, 09:42 AM
BEAT's Avatar
BEAT BEAT is online now
SEARING RED GAZE
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: SKELETON HELL.
Pronouns: DUDE/BRO
Posts: 24,323
Default

Side note: In spite of everything I just said, I'm not actually sure if TKD would be good for your knee, Solitayre. Lots of kicking and lots of stances that might do more harm than good.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-05-2017, 09:49 AM
Zef's Avatar
Zef Zef is online now
Find Your Reason
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: The Vortex World
Posts: 31,062
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BEAT View Post
Side note: In spite of everything I just said, I'm not actually sure if TKD would be good for your knee, Solitayre. Lots of kicking and lotS of stances that might do more harm than good.
Yeah, Tai Chi is excellent for joint work because you can do relatively high stances that put little pressure on your knees, but you have to hold the stance for a long time, which exercises the muscles... or you can do very low stances that DO put some pressure on the joint but also turn your thighs into pure steel. And the point of Tai Chi is that it's (mostly) circular movements, never locking the joints and keeping a constant motion, so the joints are rarely made to hold a lot of weight.

At most, Heel Kicks and Crawling Snakes might give you a bit of trouble, since you have to support or push your body weight with a single leg, but Tai Chi-as-therapy allows for simplified versions of those that minimize the impact.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-05-2017, 09:55 AM
Solitayre's Avatar
Solitayre Solitayre is offline
Not much of a donkey
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Michigan
Pronouns: He/Him
Posts: 9,112
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zef View Post

What struck me most about Tai Chi/Taijiquan (pun actually not intended) was how versatile an activity it is, from low-impact therapy to an actually pretty frightening martial art. One of my favorite go-to examples of this is the Cloud Hands motion, which looks very soft and gentle but is actually meant to break an attacker's elbow and bend it backwards
I just started learning the Cloud Hands stance last night. Right now I'm still learning the motions of the 108 Hand form. I've only learned like 5 or 6 so far.

Quote:
For Taijiquan, we practiced the traditional Yang style (which got an update or two in the following years) in its three tournament forms and two weapons forms, but I didn't have the chance to advance to the Staff form before graduation.
I'm learning Wu style. My instructor has studied with the Gatekeeper of Wu style Tai Chi (who I understand travels around and works with a lot of certified instructors), so he really knows his stuff. He teaches a weapons form with the spear to his intermediate students but I'm nowhere near ready for that.

Last edited by Solitayre; 10-05-2017 at 12:56 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-05-2017, 10:06 AM
YangusKhan's Avatar
YangusKhan YangusKhan is online now
does the Underpants Dance
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Colorado
Pronouns: he/him
Posts: 7,321
Default

I've wanted to try Aikido for like...7 years. It's still on my list of life goals. I think I will finally do it when I feel content with my life direction (also when I have money to spend on something consistent and long-term like that and also have a car).
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 10-05-2017, 10:49 AM
Vaeran's Avatar
Vaeran Vaeran is online now
whatever it takes
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Philadelphia
Pronouns: he/him
Posts: 8,105
Default wish I'd posted this instead

I took a judo class in fourth grade. In my lust for power I betrayed my sensei and my dojo, and turned their sacred teachings towards a path of blood and darkness

but I was a fourth grader so it literally didn't matter
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 10-05-2017, 01:02 PM
Paul le Fou's Avatar
Paul le Fou Paul le Fou is offline
We just don't know.
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Seattle
Posts: 19,668
Default

*Kool-Aid Mans in through the wall* HELLO WOULD YOU LIKE TO HEAR ABOUT HISTORICAL EUROPEAN MARTIAL ARTS
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-05-2017, 01:10 PM
Solitayre's Avatar
Solitayre Solitayre is offline
Not much of a donkey
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Michigan
Pronouns: He/Him
Posts: 9,112
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul le Fou View Post
*Kool-Aid Mans in through the wall* HELLO WOULD YOU LIKE TO HEAR ABOUT HISTORICAL EUROPEAN MARTIAL ARTS
Yes!
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 10-05-2017, 01:39 PM
Ted Ted is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 4,594
Default

I did some BJJ for about six months with a blue belt, oh, about 16 years ago. Distance-wise we were too far removed from any qualified trainers so he started a club at the local gym. No one got seriously injured so that's a plus.

I learned some cool, practical stuff and gained an appreciation for mma.

It would not be good for knee rehab.


I would also like to hear about HEMA!
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 10-05-2017, 01:51 PM
Solitayre's Avatar
Solitayre Solitayre is offline
Not much of a donkey
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Michigan
Pronouns: He/Him
Posts: 9,112
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted View Post
I did some BJJ for about six months with a blue belt, oh, about 16 years ago. Distance-wise we were too far removed from any qualified trainers so he started a club at the local gym. No one got seriously injured so that's a plus.
I've heard that finding qualified martial arts instructors can be a challenge in a lot of places. I'm pretty lucky, as the current senior instructor, or "Gatekeeper' of Wu style Tai Chi lives in Canada, and personally supervises a number of schools in Southeast Michigan, and does a lot of classes and seminars with the instructors around here. So there are some great teachers in my area.

Last edited by Solitayre; 10-05-2017 at 02:11 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 10-05-2017, 01:51 PM
BEAT's Avatar
BEAT BEAT is online now
SEARING RED GAZE
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: SKELETON HELL.
Pronouns: DUDE/BRO
Posts: 24,323
Default HAHA YES IS ONE OF THOSE WORDS THAT SEEMS SUPER WRONG WHEN YOU REALLY LOOK AT IT.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul le Fou View Post
*Kool-Aid Mans in through the wall* HELLO WOULD YOU LIKE TO HEAR ABOUT HISTORICAL EUROPEAN MARTIAL ARTS
YES.

YES I WOULD.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 10-05-2017, 02:37 PM
Ample Vigour's Avatar
Ample Vigour Ample Vigour is offline
S*xual Tyrannosaurus
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 23,605
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BEAT View Post
It's a dopey, beginner level Martial art that should absolutely not be put in the same category as serious stuff like BJJ or Boxing. But that's okay. The niche it fills and what it allowed me to do because it's not as serious is well, important!

TKD is good.
I know I've busted TKD for years in good fun (at least I hope it was in good fun) but it really is a fantastic way to teach love of movement and the joy of getting better at something - lessons that are valuable at 7, 27, and 77.

Also there are some cats who TKD the shit out of whatever they kick. As man of letters Kendall Shields said: "95% of TKD practitioners: ppl having a good time. 5%: literal Cro Cop"
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 10-05-2017, 03:06 PM
BEAT's Avatar
BEAT BEAT is online now
SEARING RED GAZE
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: SKELETON HELL.
Pronouns: DUDE/BRO
Posts: 24,323
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ample Vigour View Post
I know I've busted TKD for years in good fun (at least I hope it was in good fun)
Can confirm it was in good fun.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 10-05-2017, 03:17 PM
Ample Vigour's Avatar
Ample Vigour Ample Vigour is offline
S*xual Tyrannosaurus
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 23,605
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BEAT View Post
Can confirm it was in good fun.
Quality.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 10-05-2017, 03:22 PM
SilentSnake's Avatar
SilentSnake SilentSnake is online now
Fun Club Agent
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Pronouns: He/him
Posts: 9,067
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ample Vigour View Post
Paul is big into HEMA and used to do judo. I do BJJ and a spot of judo on the side, and used to box hardcore. I want to say Galadrome does no-gi grappling and Silentsnake is like a purple belt in BJJ too. BEAT is a TKD black belt, I think.
Blue belt actually, but that's okay because I get to tell people that I'm the same belt level as Brock Lesnar and it sounds really impressive.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 10-06-2017, 10:03 AM
Ample Vigour's Avatar
Ample Vigour Ample Vigour is offline
S*xual Tyrannosaurus
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 23,605
Default

My copy of BEST JUDO has arrived in the post, and even the first two pages crackle with unspeakable power
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 10-06-2017, 11:20 AM
Paul le Fou's Avatar
Paul le Fou Paul le Fou is offline
We just don't know.
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Seattle
Posts: 19,668
Default

Oh man, okay, so.

HEMA is a very wide descriptor, seeing as Europe and History are both pretty big categories to draw from. The big thing that ties HEMA together and tends to define it is generally its emphasis on swordplay, though this isn't a full picture. There are many many different kinds of swords, and instructions on them from many different countries. HEMA comes from reconstructing historical martial arts manuscripts, and many people/clubs study a particular manual or author.

Longsword is the most popular. There are two major divisions: Italian and German. Italian is based on the manual of Fiore de Liberi, wherein longsword is actually a pretty small section of a manual that covers a lot of weapons with its strongest focus on wrestling and dagger. German is based on the tradition of Johannes Liechtenauer, who never actually wrote a manual but coined a "recital," kind of a long mnemonic poem, which followers of his wrote down with a "gloss," i.e. an explanation of the concepts. Liechtenauer's teaching is broken down into unarmored fencing, armored fencing, and mounted fencing, and is specifically meant for knights. Both come from, it's estimated, the late 1300s/early 1400s. The German tradition branches out to lots of different styles based on who wrote later manuals: Ringeck, Pseudo Peter von Danzig, Talhoffer, Meyer... these span a long long time, Meyer writing some 150-200 years after Liechtenauer for an almost entirely sportive context.

There's also George Silver, who wrote about English style longsword, which is really different and pretty cool, but not a lot of people study him for some reason. I'd need to mess around with his stuff to find out why.

But there are lots of other weapons people do. Rapier is a big one; it's possibly the closest historical analogy to MOF (Modern Olympic Fencing, or Sport Fencing) (although Smallsword is probably actually closer). There are a LOT of rapier manuals from Italy and Spain and I think even France with very very different styles that I can't really enumerate. There's single rapier, and rapier and dagger (with a parrying dagger in the offhand) is also popular. There's also Smallsword, a distinct weapon that's more historically recent.

There's saber, too. English military saber and Polish saber are probably the most popular styles. I'm not sure if Hungarian saber is a style or just a kind of weapon and how it differs.

There's Messer, a single-handed cutting sword from the early German tradition, and Dussack, a later evolution of that. There's Bolognese sidesword. There's English backsword and Highland broadsword from the isles.

There's sword buckler. I.33 is the German tradition and the oldest sword fechtbuch we have (and also features a woman fighting in its illustrations!). There's also Bolognese sword and buckler, which is very different. Some people even practice sword and cloak.



THEN we get into non-sword arts. The German and Italian traditions (longsword, at least) grow out of a strong emphasis on wrestling, and both have a lot of instruction on armed and unarmed wrestling and dagger play. Ott Jud is the godfather of the German wrestling (Ringen) styles, with a lot of similar texts growing out from there. Fabian von Auerswald's text has the nicest pictures. Fiore does a ton of his own wrestling and dagger, moreso than his longsword. Our Victorian guys study Bartitsu, the English wrestling/jujitsu hybrid. They also do singlestick and cane fighting, and English Pugilism (pre-queens' rules boxing). (Paul Wagner has a Grand Unifying Theory about how English arts grow out of pugilism and mainland arts grow out of wrestling because of their peasantry traditions.)

There's a lot of quarterstaff and some spear and even pollaxe and halberd throughout the texts as well (the oldest text of any sort we have is a pollaxe one, iirc, jeu de la hache?). They are super awesome and lots of us want to study them, but the problem with these is that it's literally impossible to spar safely with them, because the rotational momentum on a blunt weapon is lethal. I mean, the whole point of a pollaxe is to kill people in armor. You can't really spar with protective gear when the point is to defeat protective gear. And you can use light and flexible simulators, but if the weight and balance of the weapon is off, the techniques often won't work or won't be reliable, and you're not recreating the art anymore. You can use a flexible longsword simulator to a certain point, but when your flexible material is 6 or 7 feet long instead of 3, the laws of physics start kicking in. The only way to do it is slowly and with great control.

The same goes for montante/spadone, the "great swords". They're too heavy and too long and so have too much force behind a swing to safely spar anyone with at speed. Also they were mostly like caravan guard weapons meant for fighting multiple attackers and not dueling weapons.

I could go on and on, and I will later, but I gotta get to work.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 10-06-2017, 11:32 AM
Vaeran's Avatar
Vaeran Vaeran is online now
whatever it takes
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Philadelphia
Pronouns: he/him
Posts: 8,105
Default

What's that technique called where you slash at something and nothing seems to happen, but then you calmly sheathe your sword and snap your fingers and a laser-perfect cut appears through the object and the two halves just sort of slide apart and the camera cuts to everyone's shocked reactions

I want to learn how to do that
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 10-06-2017, 11:45 AM
Mara's Avatar
Mara Mara is offline
(╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: California
Pronouns: She/Her
Posts: 3,464
Default

I do kickboxing currently but have done fencing and aikido. Wouldn't recommend fencing if you have a knee problem; there's lots of knee-bending and bouncing movements that might aggravate things. Aikido is slightly better, though there are things like sitting seiza and knee-walking that might be problematic.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 10-06-2017, 07:34 PM
aturtledoesbite's Avatar
aturtledoesbite aturtledoesbite is offline
earthquake ace
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
Pronouns: Any
Posts: 17,270
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaeran View Post
What's that technique called where you slash at something and nothing seems to happen, but then you calmly sheathe your sword and snap your fingers and a laser-perfect cut appears through the object and the two halves just sort of slide apart and the camera cuts to everyone's shocked reactions

I want to learn how to do that
ignoring the exaggerated part of this, i think this is related to iaido?
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 10-07-2017, 01:00 PM
Wolf's Avatar
Wolf Wolf is offline
Ancient Nameless Hero
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Illinois
Posts: 1,904
Default

I actually took about a year's worth of weekly lessons in Shinkage-ryu at a local karate dojo, about... twelve years ago? Damn. It's an iaijutsu art, meaning it focuses on attacking as you draw. Iaido is if course a related discipline. If I understand things right, iaijutsu is the actual tactical discipline, where all of the kata I learned were designed to deal with specific situations where you might be attacked with a sword, and how to respond. Iaido is the concept rendered into more of an art, a discipline you pursue for the sake of it. Kind of like how kenjutsu would be actual swordfighting techniques, and how kendo is more of a "sport" (if that's not putting it offensively) derived from it. Kind of like how modern sport fencing is derived from actual sword training.

Shinkage-ryu was a little hard to take completely seriously, on account of there being no practical application, but it was good fun. It also wasn't really the dojo's main draw (that would be karate and judo, which I didn't have the money or time for, but both of which I'd really live to try), so I don't think they offer it any more.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 10-07-2017, 02:11 PM
Galadrome's Avatar
Galadrome Galadrome is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: The Capital of Canada
Posts: 2,686
Default

Yeah, I do some no-gi grappling when I'm feeling it but for the past while (3 months) I've been doing Muay Thai 5 times a week plus 1-2 private lessons for a total of 10-12 hours of training a week. The intensive instruction has been hyper productive. I want to compete in Muay Thai and the grappling is, I think, important general knowledge and useful for self defence.

Not easy on the knees.

My main instructor is an old ass man who can literally cut open sandbags with his elbows and has fought in Thailand over a hundred times. He teaches very traditional Muay Thai, which I really like. Most of the other instructors use MT as part of MMA and so teach a lower stance, more aggression, more hip rotation on the punches and all that jazz. I really like the traditional Muay Thai because of its emphasis on balance and stability, the main key I've noticed in sparring is to always be in position to attack, defend or both. Most western MT gyms don't really teach Muay Thai, imo, but you'll still be learning to fight either and fight well either way (If the gym is good).

Interestingly, speaking of TKD, my instructor has said that good TKD fighters are the worst opponents to go against in MT or kickboxing simply because of the range and versatility of their kicks. He teaches me a couple of karate and TKD style kicks, specifically the chambered kicks which he said gave him a lot of trouble in the ring. Outside of kickboxing, he says to never fight wrestlers.

The Muay Thai Theep (also called a push kick, unlike a snap kick you push from the hip and don't chamber the leg) is the greatest kick ever conceived, however. With literally just theeps and jabs you can win a fight. Checking a kick and following up with a theep is extremely satisfying, too.

If you have a good Muay Thai gym in your area and you want to learn to really beat the shit out of people its a good time!

Also, private lessons really change the game. Potentially pricey, yeah, but if you can tap into a good instructor that's how you really learn an art. On your own I feel like you'll end up developing your own interpretation of a given style rather than really being able to integrate and then synthesize the style of your instructor. The idea of lineage here really appeals to me and I very much have a commitment of inheriting my instructor's style and using it in my own way.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 10-07-2017, 02:53 PM
The Raider Dr. Jones's Avatar
The Raider Dr. Jones The Raider Dr. Jones is offline
POPE'S MEGA SQUID THRUST
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Bull City
Pronouns: FUCK IT SHIT
Posts: 11,594
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Galadrome View Post
never fight wrestlers
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 10-07-2017, 07:12 PM
Rufferto's Avatar
Rufferto Rufferto is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 1,260
Default

Damn Galadrome, you sound like a beast. Do you know where your kru fought out of? Also, how much are you paying for privates?

As of a little over a month now, I've taken bjj classes on average from 3-5 days a week. So spaz-tier white belt. I took no gi classes at American Kickboxing Academy a while back, but I'm not recalling anything I learned. In fact, just last week, my instructor taught us an escape from side control that I only just realized I had already learned in my no gi class.

I'll have about two months time off between semesters starting January, during which I was thinking of going to Thailand to train full time, just to check it off my bucket list. Phuket in particular is a mecca for people who want to do this - there's a ton of Muay Thai gyms out there, and a couple of gyms that do MMA/grappling/striking. The biggest are Tiger Muay Thai (which I believe Michael Bisping trained at), Phuket Top Team (Cyborg trains out of here), and AKA Thailand (Run by Mike Swick). They seem like great environments to focus on nothing other than eating, training, and sleeping. Plus, Muay Thai privates are like 20 bucks a pop.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 10-08-2017, 07:15 AM
Galadrome's Avatar
Galadrome Galadrome is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: The Capital of Canada
Posts: 2,686
Default

I pay $30 for privates, the guy is really nice and a good friend of the gym owner (The owners original instructor, actually) so he offers deals really cheap when training out of my gym. I don't know the gyms he fought for in Thailand, but he fought there a very long time ago so I'll need to ask him. He's half Thai and can speak the language and I know for a time he fought independent of any gym, as well, which is wild. Chances are the gym he trained at wasn't one of the well known ones in the west.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
expert timing , flawless victory , frame cancel into super , hide your power level , i know kung fu , kung-fu fighting , limit break , martial arts , over nine thousand , swords and stuff

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:01 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Your posts İyou, 2007