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  #4441  
Old 02-20-2019, 11:45 AM
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  #4442  
Old 02-21-2019, 06:35 PM
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Man, Swallowing the Earth is something else. On one hand its silly, grievously offensive at times, and frankly all over the place. On the other hand, its unique, daring, and also fascinating in that anyone was making anything like this at all back then.

I'm reading it back to back with Book of Human Insects and I actually prefer it to that. Neither book is particularly focused, but Swallowing intersperses its main narrative with single chapter vignettes that play on some of the larger story beats in ways that are often much better than the main storyline. One of the vignettes in particular (the one where the doctor mind melds with his traumatized patient, for those who've read it) almost feels like a dry run for certain visual elements of the fifth Phoenix story, though they are not as skillfully pulled off here as in that story.
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  #4443  
Old 02-21-2019, 07:46 PM
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So my journey with Fourteen. Jeez. It's a messy ride. But a really interesting mess. Endlessly fascinating. But unfortunately it also has some weird rapey stuff. But not conventional rapey stuff. It's not even specifically the kind I'm usually bothered by in manga where it's trying to be "we know rape is bad but... hot, right?". So I guess I'm thankful for that, strangely. Like, the first rape scene starts maybe homophobic, but then gets Cronenbergian, THEN takes a left turn.

Basically, (censored both for spoilers but also because it is a rape scene and I'm going into detail here) two genetically engineered humans are wrestling for the amusement of humans, then as a power move one seems to try to rape the other (it's not clearly shown but is certainly extremely unsubtle about what it's getting at), then the first guy turns the tables and he starts raping his opponent. Then his opponent, who he is raping, has his head turn into a chicken and gains a woman's breasts and seems to fellate his opponent. Then the prime minister of Japan appears and says "children of the Earth, we are sending you away on a rocket before the Earth ends!"

So... yeah.

Then, later on, aliens come to Earth to suck our life forces in a manner that is very rapey but with weird organs.

I was already struggling to figure out what this comic was saying politically but now I'm just flummoxed. I really don't know how to gauge this comic, critically. I feel like since this was the last comic in a creator's long, distinguished career, he decided to through everything he had left into this thing until there was nothing left.
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  #4444  
Old 02-22-2019, 03:23 PM
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I don't know if Umezu had much in the way of ideology outside of "the innocence and idealism of children is sacred."


Also, y'know what I forgot about Lone Wolf and Cub? I forgot that it was awesome. Its so fucking awesome.
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  #4445  
Old 02-22-2019, 04:50 PM
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Also, y'know what I forgot about Lone Wolf and Cub? I forgot that it was awesome. Its so fucking awesome.
I know, right? I keep feeling like learning that he did Mad Bull 34 might retroactively ruin it for me somehow, but it doesn't.
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  #4446  
Old 02-25-2019, 10:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Mightyblue View Post
I wouldn't really classify Voynich as horror, exactly, more of a charming love story between a goddess of fate and some mafia schmuck.
Dowman Seiman is definitely a fan of making references to really strange cultural touchstones or placing them in strange contexts. It's less of an actively horrific thing and more of a "huh, that's weird" thing. (...Sort of like how Link's Awakening relates to Twin Peaks, now that I think about it.)

Like if Junji Ito's work is like


Then DS's work is more like
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  #4447  
Old 02-26-2019, 07:26 AM
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I finished my seemingly annual reread of The Kurosagi Corpse Delivery Service today, and it's still just about the most perfect episodic story ever told. Unfortunately its potentially endless format and troubled publishing history mean we'll probably never see the rest of it. I have the four omnibus editions that cover through to volume 12 but I'm not willing to blow a hundred goddamn dollars on a little bit more, especially when that's still not even close to the end of it.
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  #4448  
Old 02-27-2019, 11:21 AM
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The remainder of Beck showed up on Comixology. I pray for a print edition in the near future.
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  #4449  
Old 02-27-2019, 12:19 PM
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I kinda felt like Beck's second act is just a rehash of the first- it literally repeats almost every plot beat and twist.

All that said, the artist's basic af taste aside, its the only good manga or comic about being in a band, IMO. Maybe could've been more pointedly scummier, though...
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  #4450  
Old 02-28-2019, 03:37 PM
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Does anyone have any insight into or links to writing on vintage manga collecting or the used manga market in Japan?
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  #4451  
Old 02-28-2019, 03:41 PM
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Originally Posted by ghosttaster View Post
Does anyone have any insight into or links to writing on vintage manga collecting or the used manga market in Japan?
What do you want to know about?

(I'm not sure if I will know writing that will meet your needs, but some questions I could just answer.)
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  #4452  
Old 02-28-2019, 04:50 PM
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Hmm.. To be honest I sort of made it a broad question because I have a broad interest.

Lately I've been creeping one of the manga-oriented Mandarake instagrams and the breadth of interest groups represented there, and the variety of editions astounds me.

Also, recently I feel like there's been a new influx of knowledge on vintage manga through Ryan Holmberg's various projects that I think are really showing how little we in the English-only world really know. I've also come to realize how deeply my perspective is affected by my being a cultural outsider- there seems to be a huge number of manga tied to specifc Japanese cultural moments, eras, or perspectives to which I'm entirely oblivious.

So... I guess I'm curious about what might be popular or valuable that Westerners may be oblivious to. Also, what are the views are on vintage publications vs reprints? My understanding is that for series run in magazines, the collected editions can often feature redrawn or touched up pages different from serialization (Devilman famously has a number of added, removed, and redrawn scenes, for example). I believe you (estragon) and I may have had an exchange on here about best of vs. chronological editions of Kitaro- I love talking and hearing about that kind of thing.

Those are just examples though and Im not even really hoping for anything that specific- I think that, knowing nothing, Id be interested in just about anything someone might say on the subject.

Not interested in doujin commentary though (sorry), pro stuff only
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  #4453  
Old 03-01-2019, 02:48 AM
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Also, recently I feel like there's been a new influx of knowledge on vintage manga through Ryan Holmberg's various projects that I think are really showing how little we in the English-only world really know.
There is just so much manga being made, most people have no idea. There are dozens upon dozens of publications that each pump out dozens of comics on a weekly/monthly basis. To say nothing of professional and semi-professional web comics that are becoming a bigger and bigger thing. (To say nothing of the eromanga industry and how prolific that is.) We only ever hear about the popular ones that people latch onto and get localized/scanlated, but that's a miniscule fraction of stuff. Most of the comics I see get scanlated are comics that only get picked up because interest in them only gets drummed up after a successful anime adaptation gets made and streamed. The amount of comics we get here officially distributed versus what is actually being made is like, on the level of scarcity of the anime industry in the 80s/90s in the US. It's kinda crazy!

I have an internet-friend who was born in Japan, but mostly grew up in the US and he's deep into manga. And the vast majority of stuff he reads and tells me about I've never friggin' heard of, has never/will never get translated, and is just a complete enigma to most people outside of Japan. I tried to get him to make a MAL account one time so he could keep track of the 100+ comics he reads on a regular basis, but he got frustrated and quit because like half of the stuff he reads doesn't even have MAL entries. And the language barrier, combined with the decline in piracy only makes it harder for people to find this stuff.
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  #4454  
Old 03-01-2019, 01:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ghosttaster View Post
Hmm.. To be honest I sort of made it a broad question because I have a broad interest.

So... I guess I'm curious about what might be popular or valuable that Westerners may be oblivious to. Also, what are the views are on vintage publications vs reprints? My understanding is that for series run in magazines, the collected editions can often feature redrawn or touched up pages different from serialization (Devilman famously has a number of added, removed, and redrawn scenes, for example). I believe you (estragon) and I may have had an exchange on here about best of vs. chronological editions of Kitaro- I love talking and hearing about that kind of thing.

Those are just examples though and Im not even really hoping for anything that specific- I think that, knowing nothing, Id be interested in just about anything someone might say on the subject.
It sounds like you do know a lot of the basics, and I think a lot of the details from there would not be too surprising.

This is probably obvious, but there was not an exact analogue to the comic speculation boom of the 1990s. So, generally, you're not getting people selling a certain week of shonen jump or whatever because it's the First Appearance of Vegeta or whatever, in the same way you get a huge mark up on say first printings of New Mutants 84 and 98 because those are the first appearances of Cable and Deadpool. You do get people paying a lot more for, for example, the first ever issue featuring Dragon Ball, though. But immediately before or after that the price plummets unless it's a collected year of issues. Generally, rather than specific issues, where prices go up for comic magazines are for complete collections of a certain year of issues.

Manga magazines are huge and take up a lot of space, so collecting them seriously and comprehensively is extremely niche. But there are academic/research/archival libraries you can visit that specialize in collecting original manga magazines for people with an interest in them. Generally, the primary purpose of using those is more for cultural research about publication history rather than comparing art revisions. (Looking at non-manga materials in the magazines, looking at who these magazines were envisioning with their target audience and how they were engaging them, what kinds of ads were in those magazines, etc.) Or, at least, this is how the people working in those institutions oftne tend to see it. That's not to say that there isn't value in seeing how works changed between serialization and reprinting, of course.

Rare or niche manga aren't necessarily going to be the most valuable. Many niche things Ryan Holmberg talks about aren't necessarily going to be all that expensive to collect by the standards of the Japanese used books market. And generally it's not just the case that the English speaking world doesn't know about them: Your average Japanese person won't necessarily know about them either. At the same time, works from say Garo and COM are probably some of the most obvious examples of alternative or experimental manga, but that doesn't mean that they're well known to even Japanese speaking audiences. So, this is not a suggestion that his research is not meaningful. Even these major works are under-studied outside of a few big names, in both English and Japanese.

The most expensive collectors' item books (in the $10,000s range) are predictably high quality first editions of some specific early works by Tezuka Osamu, Mizuki Shigeru, and Fujiko Fujio. (The links is to a Japanese article by the VP of Mandrake, talking about the three most expensive books.)
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  #4455  
Old 03-02-2019, 06:58 PM
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Fukakai na Boku no Subete o is gradually turning into an amazing dark horse secret candidate on the shortlist of great LGBT manga? Like this is literally a spin-off from a hentai doujin, I did not expect it to be good.

The elevator pitch: POV Normaldude protagonist feels pity for Mogumo, a crossdressing kid in his class, and offers them a job at his family's "Girlyboy Café" (I know, just... just bear with me here). Once there, it's made explicit that Mogumo is femme-presenting, but explicitly nonbinary and kind of offended with the whole idea of the café, which leads to a gradual genre deconstruction of the kind of stupid crossdressing fluff stories that I'm all about.

Like there's this whole love triangle with a (self-identified straight) boy and a (self-identified gay) girl both crushing on Mogumo and wondering what that says about their sexuality.

The protagonist reassesses his relationship with his transgender sister and starts making an effort to better respect her.

It takes a brief but hard swing at shitty gay stereotypes played for comedy and how they can hurt people.

One of the other employees is a gay boy who never stops talking about his boyfriend and it's universally presented as sweet and adorable.

It's kind of incredible???
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  #4456  
Old 03-02-2019, 10:16 PM
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It's really good! The art style might brush on the side of cutely generic and conventional at first glance, but within that space it's doing a lot with expressions and even some quietly impressive things with how bodies are depicted (I love how the author draws arms and hands). All the little and not so little things that in other series would irk me have seemingly been set up specifically to be later addressed by the narrative, and don't hang on as vestigial reminders of missed opportunities or halfway-there treatment of the subject matter. I was afraid it would faceplant but instead it's soared.
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  #4457  
Old 03-11-2019, 06:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ANN
Manga creator George Morikawa appeared on an Abema TV program on March 5, and when asked a question about possibly running out of material for his Hajime no Ippo boxing manga, Morikawa responded "when I think about the [story] material, I've probably only covered about half of it." He jokingly added that he is not planning to take another 30 years to get through the rest of the story, stating that it would be really troublesome.
Ippo will outlive us all.
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