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  #31  
Old 09-18-2012, 08:29 AM
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Man, what a weird thing to devote so much thought to.

No wonder you don't get much else done.
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  #32  
Old 09-18-2012, 09:51 AM
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The laziest and hardest working people I know fit the opposite way around - one is working his hardest to pull himself out of poverty, the other failed his first year of university studying a language he already knows due to both poor exam scores and lack of attendance (before moving to Egypt to be a bartender). But these seem down to their personal lives, entitlements and experiences.

In my experience, wealth & privilege are more related to work ethic than any religious affiliations.
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  #33  
Old 09-18-2012, 12:42 PM
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Originally Posted by TK Flash View Post
The constant mind-numbing stimulation of video games has trained you to be unable to accept anything less stimulating than full-on digital opium. You are lazy because no mundane daily task is as stimulating and no rewarding learning task tickles your reward centers as frequently or easily.
Video games rot your brain.
No, don't you see? Video games hone your brain to seek out only the finest experiences. We're not lazy, we're just saving ourselves up for a better set of tasks. To the stars, my brethren!
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  #34  
Old 09-18-2012, 02:55 PM
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Originally Posted by TK Flash View Post
The constant mind-numbing stimulation of video games has trained you to be unable to accept anything less stimulating than full-on digital opium. You are lazy because no mundane daily task is as stimulating and no rewarding learning task tickles your reward centers as frequently or easily.
Yes, this is very, very true.

I haven't been gaming a whole lot lately, but I haven't found enough enjoyment in anything else. Even though this is probably the least appropriate forum on the internet to ask this question, any advice on how to break this habit and move onto something better?

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Originally Posted by Googleshng View Post
WTF do you mean by "ethnic tradition?"
Several high-achieving people I've befriended are a Japanese American, a Hindi American, and several Jews, all of whom were raised in the US, taught their ancestral languages by their parents, and made extensive visits to their countries of ancestral origin. Most of them had at least one professor as a parent.

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I hope this thread isn't stealth Obama campaign marketing research.
No. The rabbi who made me think about this stuff didn't sound like an Obama fan.
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  #35  
Old 09-18-2012, 03:10 PM
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I'd have to say the Pavlovian/cocaine-addicted-rat twitchiness of browsing the internet and constantly checking SMS messages and emails, etc (activities which, thanks to smartphones, a great deal of people are now immersed in - although not in the traditional sense of concentrating on anything - all day), is a far more successful destroyer of attention spans than the comparatively sedate and focused pastime of playing video games, which almost seems healthy next to this.

(And the scary thing here is that this is precisely not a question of laziness - increasingly commonly, you're immersed in this space because of your job. Clicky clicky click. Always partially attentive, always hyperactive, and yet always simultaneously bored.)

Last edited by Klatrymadon; 09-18-2012 at 03:23 PM.
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  #36  
Old 09-18-2012, 03:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vega View Post
Several high-achieving people I've befriended are a Japanese American, a Hindi American, and several Jews, all of whom were raised in the US, taught their ancestral languages by their parents, and made extensive visits to their countries of ancestral origin. Most of them had at least one professor as a parent.
I'm an indian-american who speaks my ancestral languages, goes back to the motherland with high frequency, and has highly educated parents (6 or 7 degrees and like 8 languages between them), AND i act as a priest and ritualist for my community, and i'm lazy as fuck.

correlation and causation etc, etc.
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  #37  
Old 09-18-2012, 03:31 PM
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How are we defining laziness here? Not wanting to work? Not wanting to work when it's not necessary? Not wanting to work harder than necessary to get the job done? Being generally inactive?

I don't like to work when I don't have to, but when I DO have to (or am interested enough in something non-essential to take it on anyway) I take my work seriously and get it done right. I have a strong work ethic, I just don't leave it on all the time. I don't work for work's sake, I work for a purpose, whether personal or professional. Most people are the same way, I think (even those who might appear to be working for work's sake).

I find it interesting that I have an outlook almost identical to shivam's statement here when it comes to morality and religion, only I come at it from an atheist POV. I acknowledge that religions can often offer good guidelines for how to live morally (for particular sets of morals), but don't recognize them as the source of those morals (and certainly not the only source, given any particular religion). I've had a number of people express surprise at my moral convictions in light of my atheism, which is always mildly insulting.
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  #38  
Old 09-18-2012, 03:52 PM
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I never understood the idea of linking morality with religion. Maybe it comes with growing up with a religion outside of the status quo, but the way i figure it, good and bad are innate human qualities that anyone can understand and stand by, without needing to pinpoint an origin.
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  #39  
Old 09-18-2012, 04:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vega View Post
Several high-achieving people I've befriended are a Japanese American, a Hindi American, and several Jews, all of whom were raised in the US, taught their ancestral languages by their parents, and made extensive visits to their countries of ancestral origin. Most of them had at least one professor as a parent.
That's less to do with religion and culture and more to do with having to work twice as hard to gain the same amount of respect commanded by a white Anglo-Saxon Protestant combined with the fact their families probably come from at least the upper middle class in their home countries and were possibly even upper middle class in the US and could afford to be very well educated. I assume this because you say they were fluent in two languages which meant their parents had the monetary means to enroll them in language schools, hire a tutor, one of the parents earned enough the other could stay at home and teach the kids the mother tongue themselves, or could live in a neighborhood that had language immersion schools. Also if the family could afford several trips to their home country throughout their childhood they were not poor. For the record, I don't consider myself fluent in Mandarin, there were no language schools where we lived, both my parents worked, Chinese was not offered in my school system yet I managed to get high enough marks I could get into an elite high school my last two years of highs hook that did have Chinese. My family only visited China twice when I was a kid but I knew other immigrant families who every summer when school wasn't in session would at least send their kids "home".
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  #40  
Old 09-18-2012, 04:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shivam View Post
I never understood the idea of linking morality with religion. Maybe it comes with growing up with a religion outside of the status quo, but the way i figure it, good and bad are innate human qualities that anyone can understand and stand by, without needing to pinpoint an origin.
If one's religion is a source of moral superiority for your culture, then all those other people with different ideas who live on land you want or have resources you covet or live their lives in a manner counter to your own are, by virtue of not sharing the One True Belief System, wrong and bad and evil so it's OK to kill them/convert them/enslave them and not feel guilty about it because they're hardly even human anyway. It's not really about morality in any real sense; it's about defining the Other.

Whether this sort of thought and action originates with religious leaders or political ones (or both, when they're the same) varies from case to case.

This article and the one it mainly references, via a different subject, goes some way toward elaborating on what I'm trying to say here about perceived moral superiority.

Last edited by Sarcasmorator; 09-18-2012 at 05:29 PM.
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  #41  
Old 09-18-2012, 07:50 PM
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My favorite Jesus is the Christmas Jesus.
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  #42  
Old 09-18-2012, 09:04 PM
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Also: pray smarter, not harder. I bet you could get most of that done with a few lines of pearl and a cronjob.
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  #43  
Old 09-18-2012, 09:14 PM
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It's good to know I'm a "secular". lol
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  #44  
Old 09-18-2012, 09:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir Sly Ry View Post
It's good to know I'm a "secular". lol
In my deepest heart of hearts, I want it to be the case that when Vega and the people at his church use the term, they spit it out of their mouths in contempt. But then I remember he's a Unitarian
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  #45  
Old 09-18-2012, 10:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Wolfgang View Post
In my deepest heart of hearts, I want it to be the case that when Vega and the people at his church use the term, they spit it out of their mouths in contempt.
Oh wow, I laughed out loud, sincerely. Even more than the first time.
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  #46  
Old 09-18-2012, 10:13 PM
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in india, secular and religious aren't oppositional terms. they don't have to be in america either. secular just means keeping religious activities and temporal activities separate. I'm both secular and theistic, for instance. I'm very happy with my chosen belief system, but i don't want it involved in governance or policy making. there's no need for religionists to make secular into some kind of dirty word.
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  #47  
Old 09-18-2012, 10:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vega View Post
Several high-achieving people I've befriended are a Japanese American, a Hindi American, and several Jews, all of whom were raised in the US, taught their ancestral languages by their parents, and made extensive visits to their countries of ancestral origin. Most of them had at least one professor as a parent.
People who are smart and successful enough to emigrate up or across to a different country in a professional capacity tend to be pretty hard-working, yeah, and so it makes sense that their kids would be too.
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  #48  
Old 09-18-2012, 11:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vega View Post
I haven't been gaming a whole lot lately, but I haven't found enough enjoyment in anything else. Even though this is probably the least appropriate forum on the internet to ask this question, any advice on how to break this habit and move onto something better?
There's nothing "better," that's why it's an addiction. You're just going to have to brain up and realize you can't get through life mesmerized by lights and bleeps with the tickle of high score on your brain all the time. At some point you're going to have to put the controller down - hopefully before you add the six-hundredth shrink-wrapped, brand-new release to your backloggery - and think hard about society as a whole and your role in it. Think of some way you can make a contribution to society in a mutually beneficial way, and learn that nothing good in life comes as easily as the satisfaction as self-serving time on the lightning box.

Then you should be able to restore the hobby to hobby status where it belongs. Just like you can't have pizza and fizzy pops at every meal, you can't let yourself stay obsessed with digital drug without it causing some sort of damage.

Last edited by TK Flash; 09-19-2012 at 07:08 AM.
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  #49  
Old 09-19-2012, 12:27 AM
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I mean, I would never expect TK to be this paternalistic.

WAY2GO

(Nazis)
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  #50  
Old 09-19-2012, 12:32 AM
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Don't worry Diz-kun, you can always count on your oniisan for good, solid, loving advice.
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  #51  
Old 09-19-2012, 06:39 AM
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christians drive cars like this
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  #52  
Old 09-19-2012, 08:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Wolfgang View Post
But then I remember he's a Unitarian
In the Ghandi Room* at the Unitarian** church named Our Church of the Sacred Whatever, there hangs a banner that reads, "Somebody or Something Loves You!!"

*Every Unitarian church has one.
** in all sincerity, Unitarians are generally pretty rad
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  #53  
Old 09-19-2012, 08:40 AM
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i was gonna write a post about how non-religious people can be just as ambitious and driven as any religious person but

eh

i'll get around to it later

obvious joke
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  #54  
Old 09-19-2012, 09:17 AM
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If it weren't for my secular laziness I would probably hang out at the nearby Unitarian church. They's good people.
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