The Return of Talking Time

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-   -   The "Not worth its own thread" thread - Creative Edition (http://www.talking-time.net/showthread.php?t=11327)

Sprite 02-08-2011 08:15 PM

The "Not worth its own thread" thread - Creative Edition
 
I'm currently trying to redesign one of my old comic characters so she looks black without cheating with skin tones or turning her into a horrible caricature. Kind of difficult, actually. Racially distinct cartoon characters are tricky.

When I grow up I want to be Alison Bechdel:

Karzac 02-08-2011 08:16 PM

That does a pretty good job, I think. And it does look a lot like Bechdel's stuff.

Sprite 02-08-2011 09:43 PM

It is Bechdel's stuff.

Karzac 02-08-2011 09:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sprite (Post 970421)
It is Bechdel's stuff.

Oh! I was confused! I thought that was an example of your work. Nevermind then, you can ignore me.

Alex Scott 02-09-2011 08:14 AM

I'm getting close to the end of the current draft of my novel. I had to rewrite virtually the entire middle, but everything else mostly required medium revision. I think I'm on track to finish this by my birthday next week, and begin a more focused revision soon after that.

Sprite 02-09-2011 09:22 AM

First novel?

Alex Scott 02-09-2011 10:20 AM

Very much so. I also need to send out some short stories; there are some I meant to back in December, two that got rejected, and one that's still pending. It's time I got published, dangit.

Kirin 02-09-2011 11:57 AM

My wife has been in revision hell with her first novel for months now. I can't say I envy that part of the process. She got a short story published in the meantime, though! I'm proud of her. Though I do hope she can get the novel to a point where she's happy enough to submit it before she gets utterly, completely sick of it. I hear this is often a problem with novels.

Alex Scott 02-09-2011 12:35 PM

Yeah. I wrote a big blog post a few months ago about editing and the general approach I've been trying to follow ever since. I think I'll skim through The Artful Edit again after this draft is done.

Merus 02-14-2011 08:02 AM

I'm trying to relearn how to draw eyes. The lazy way I do it has character:



but it's got to go. It's very prone to not looking symmetrical, it's not very expressive (is this a sad eye or is it angry about something down?) and it looks weird at angles that aren't straight on or 3/4.



Unfortunately, most of my attempts to do something a little more robust either don't have any character (doing circles or two curved lines that join up on either end of the eyeball) or don't really fix the problem.



I figure my biggest problem is getting some variation in the upper eyelid so I can raise or lower it as required, but the fact that it isn't working suggests that I might have misdiagnosed the problem.



Traumadore 02-14-2011 10:56 AM

Hey Merus, I usually consider myself to be "carving" out the eyes (or forms in general" from the white surface. So (1) I start with really general lines, usually two curves that don't connect. This locates the eye, but you're not really committed to anything yet, and you can change the angles or distances without having to do a lot of extra work.

(2) I add in creases above and below the eye. Different people have it to different degrees, but this helps give some indication that there is indeed a sphere in there. I'll connect the top and bottom curves with little half circles, and decide how prominent the corners of the eye are going to be for this person. I added value to show the iris and pupil without sweating roundness, they just have to be roughly the same size dark circles.

(3)I lovered the top lid and dilated the pupil a little since the previous eyes looed surprised, after step 2 you can start getting the feeling of the expression while still being able to change it with minimal effort. I added hashes to give the top and bottom lids more dimensionality, and solid value to the irises.

(4) The eye was pretty much fully defined, so I just added some more value to the surrounding area to suggest its relationship with the rest of the face, and some reflected lights to suggest a relationship with the surroundings.

The nice thing about eyes is that there is such variety in life that it's easy to come up with something that looks plausible, especially since most people's eyes are asymmetrical. I hope this help you or someone. It was a nice warm up.


Loki 02-15-2011 01:46 AM

Merus, your problem made me think of this. Maybe it'll help?

Merus 02-17-2011 07:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Loki (Post 975803)
Merus, your problem made me think of this. Maybe it'll help?

Thought I'd check in: this actually did help quite a bit, in that it gave me a few avenues to try fiddling with the shapes. I'm getting to a point where I like the look but I can play with the lines to make expressions clearer, but I'm going to bust out an expression book to get it a little more robust.

I like the way big pupils looks, but I also really like drawing irises. I'm going to play around with that - one thought is that I might just do irises when I colour, and give the pupil a textured edge that suggests the iris. I'm going to try it out to see if it looks dumb, and if not, might keep that.

SpoonyBardOL 02-23-2011 02:07 PM

I doodled this for the BGMF Thunderdome Remix II thread and I feel pretty cool about it.


mopinks 03-02-2011 03:14 PM

we painted and installed some tiny little bow-shaped shelves so my girlfriend could put some ponies on them!

it ain't easy bein' this gangsta :cool:

Kate or Die! 03-02-2011 04:43 PM

BOW SHELVES WHERE GET THEM? WANT

Guy 03-02-2011 05:32 PM

I can't wait to tell you guys about my possible webcomic because one of my friends and I accidentally came up with the best title for it. Even if the comic itself sucks, I will forever be proud of the title.

Lady 03-02-2011 08:29 PM

neeeeeeeed mooooooore muuuuuucha postersssssssssssssssssss

I knew I recognized her, though! She's summer!

Dizzy 03-04-2011 11:30 AM

If you guys are looking for a blog that updates with a lot crazy, freaky, awesome stuff check out 50 Watts (formerly known as A Journey Round My Skull). Has to be one the better channels of the crazy stuff I used to catch on Jahsonic, only with less extensive culture stuff.

Samples:

Harry Clarke
Erin Blumenfield
Phil Kirkland

MetManMas 03-07-2011 05:31 PM

We got a brand new Wacom Bamboo tablet today! It's a bit...different than we expected it to be,* but this baby's gonna be fun to draw digital art with once we get accustomed to using it.

*Keep in mind this is our first tablet. I was thinking it'd be less like a pen that works like a mouse, and more like a DS touchscreen. Oh well, it'll be fun to learn.

Lady 03-07-2011 11:18 PM

It is pretty confusing, especially since you can't adjust the orientation of the device (in my lap, for me typically) without taking in account the angle of your "paper" effectively changing, but the screen doesn't reflect that! so you have to do it allll mentally

Traumadore 03-08-2011 11:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MetManMas (Post 992290)
*Keep in mind this is our first tablet. I was thinking it'd be less like a pen that works like a mouse, and more like a DS touchscreen. Oh well, it'll be fun to learn.

Yeah, they only make ones with screens in them for $1K or $2k. Which is just silly considering they're only I/O devices and you could get an entire touchscreen tablet PC for like half the price and hook it up with wacom drivers.

Anyway, it may superficially work like a mouse, but you should be able to adjust the brushes in whatever you're using to so that it also controls angle, diameter, opacity, pretty much anything, all using the angle and pressure information from the stylus. If you don't have software that has these brush options then get some. Otherwise yes, it is a pen that works like a mouse.

Merus 03-09-2011 06:15 AM

The killer feature for tablets is pressure sensitivity. You can do mouse painting, with care, but pressure gives it the life that frequently doesn't come through from the mouse-drawn stuff.

MetManMas 03-09-2011 12:21 PM

It sounds like I've still got a lot to learn about tablets. But hey, I found an online tutorial about how to make it work with GiMP* after a quick Google search, so I'll try that out when I get the chance. It's got more options than MS Paint does, and I'd like to learn how to use 'em.

*Which I'd link to here if I wasn't using a candy bar controlled browser with no copy/paste function right now.

BEAT 03-09-2011 12:24 PM

So in the near future I'll be writing regularity for two of my friends websites.

That's pretty neat.

bobbywatson 03-09-2011 06:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MetManMas (Post 994048)
It sounds like I've still got a lot to learn about tablets. But hey, I found an online tutorial about how to make it work with GiMP* after a quick Google search, so I'll try that out when I get the chance. It's got more options than MS Paint does, and I'd like to learn how to use 'em.

*Which I'd link to here if I wasn't using a candy bar controlled browser with no copy/paste function right now.

I've been able to use a graphic tablet with GIMP in the past. It worked flawlessly on the Mac, but I've always had issues in Windows (mostly with the offset: I would click on the drawing and the line would appear somewhere else. Quite annoying.) I can't remember if I have tried Linux or not.

Traumadore 03-10-2011 09:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bobbywatson (Post 994397)
I've been able to use a graphic tablet with GIMP in the past. It worked flawlessly on the Mac, but I've always had issues in Windows (mostly with the offset: I would click on the drawing and the line would appear somewhere else. Quite annoying.) I can't remember if I have tried Linux or not.

That's pretty inexplicable.

Oh wait, no it's not. Windows has it's own (crappy)graphics tablet process which engages automatically that can drop your performance like a rock and cause other bugginess if you're using the wacom drivers. Basically it's two sets of drivers trying to interpret your input simultaneously. Next time you try it you should look in your processes and stop the microsoft ones. You might have to do this every time you start working.

Are you continuing your drawing lessons?

bobbywatson 03-10-2011 06:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Traumadore (Post 994862)
That's pretty inexplicable.

Oh wait, no it's not. Windows has it's own (crappy)graphics tablet process which engages automatically that can drop your performance like a rock and cause other bugginess if you're using the wacom drivers. Basically it's two sets of drivers trying to interpret your input simultaneously. Next time you try it you should look in your processes and stop the microsoft ones. You might have to do this every time you start working.

Are you continuing your drawing lessons?

I will give that a try this weekend if I have a few minutes! Though my new desktop uses Windows 7, we'll see if that changes anything. (Probably not).

I am continuing my drawing lessons. Or rather, I would be continuing them if I was not traveling. The good news is I'll be home this week, so I should be able to have one lesson, plus my regular weekly class. Which reminds me that I still have not completed the homework from 3 weeks ago. The bad news is that I'll probably be back on the road the following week, traveling to Wisconsin this time. Oh well, it's not confirmed yet, so I'll keep my fingers crossed, hoping to be able to be home another week.

Paul le Fou 03-14-2011 12:14 AM

I'm writing a song! This is something that I don't do, but it came to me part and parcel with a game/story idea in a dream, and now I'm trying to hash one out. As well as trying to fight down thoughts of impostorhood for writing an Irish folk song without any Irish. Also worrying over whether the tune is already an actual Irish folk song, which is possible! I don't know much about Irish folk songs!

All in all (game, world, story, song, name) this is one of the few new ideas I've had recently, and it makes me pretty happy to put together something like this from whole cloth. Not that it's near done.

Paul le Fou 03-15-2011 02:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Paul le Fou (Post 997685)
I'm writing a song! This is something that I don't do, but it came to me part and parcel with a game/story idea in a dream, and now I'm trying to hash one out. As well as trying to fight down thoughts of impostorhood for writing an Irish folk song without any Irish. Also worrying over whether the tune is already an actual Irish folk song, which is possible! I don't know much about Irish folk songs!

All in all (game, world, story, song, name) this is one of the few new ideas I've had recently, and it makes me pretty happy to put together something like this from whole cloth. Not that it's near done.

Apparently it is as I feared - I realized that the tune is almost entirely lifted from Believe Me if All Those Endearing Young Charms. At least for the first phrase of it. Thanks a lot, Looney Tunes! Trying to re-do it now... but I'm not good with the musics!

Sprite 03-18-2011 08:18 AM

I once wrote a thoroughly ridiculous theme song for a game a friend and I were making (that we never made). I was quite proud of it until the opening motif showed up, interval for interval, as the opening motif of Stephen Colbert's theme song. Even though I wrote it like three years before that show premiered I can't show it to anyone without it looking like I just ripped that bit off.

Not that it matters, really, because it's thoroughly ridiculous, as I said.

eternaljwh 05-26-2011 08:48 PM

Anyone have an open-source sequencer to recommend, preferably with a piano roll mode?

Ruik 05-30-2011 09:14 PM

I need some advice for online, print-it-yourself books. Helen wants to print up ~5 copies of her finished Master's Thesis and is trying to find a good online place to do it. We've looked at Lulu and Blurb. From what we could see, Blurb assumes you are doing full color and charges accordingly, while Helen just wants to do black and white. So, Lulu looks like our best bet so far, but I was hoping to hear what other people's experiences have been.

Warg 05-31-2011 03:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eternaljwh (Post 1065614)
Anyone have an open-source sequencer to recommend, preferably with a piano roll mode?

No piano roll mode sadly, but if you want a few open-source sequencers --

gahitsu 06-16-2011 01:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bobbywatson (Post 994397)
I've been able to use a graphic tablet with GIMP in the past. It worked flawlessly on the Mac, but I've always had issues in Windows (mostly with the offset: I would click on the drawing and the line would appear somewhere else. Quite annoying.) I can't remember if I have tried Linux or not.

HEY YOU I HAD THE SAME PROBLEM I FIXED IT LET ME TELL YOU HOW

I had the SAME gripe, actually, but I was googling another big tablet issue (my lines always come out shaky, SUPER SHAKY, like I'm drawing on the back of a speeding truck and also super drunk and also super palsy and also having an epileptic seizure kind of shaky), but I found out that there's a setting in Windows that will TOTALLY FIX THE PROBLEM YOU AND I HAD.

Wacoms, or at least this Bamboo one which I guess we both have, are automatically set to pen mode (in Windows at least, maybe not Macs, maybe that's the difference). So, basically, where you hit the pen on your tablet roughly corresponds with where it shows up on the screen - is the way I understand it. That's really not an issue with a tablet screen, since you'd be hitting where you want to draw anyway, but if you're using a tablet peripheral, this means the cursor is going to look like it's bouncing all over the place when you pick it up for any reason. Some people are okay with this, and I'm sure you'd get used to it with practice buuuuuut the superior tablet option is mouse mode! This means that whenever the pen leaves the tablet, and then is placed back onto the pad, the cursor will pick up where you left off, not somewhere else.

I can, with like 98% certainty, say that this will fix your problem. I'm not sure where it would be otherwise - maybe the same place - but in Windows 7, I went to Control Panel > Bamboo > Mouse Mode.

If anyone's having problems with wobbly lines, let me mention real quick that I found out that Wacoms are sensitive to other devices' outputs (and they have to be, by regulation, or at least they cannot be manufactured to interfere or block). So, I had the tablet smooshed in between the monitor and the case, and when I scooted the monitor way, way back, and scooched the tablet close to me, so there was a gap of one-two feet between my tablet and the other gadgets, my problem improved greatly. Unfortunately, routers can and do disrupt the signal, sooo, if it's still a big issue, you may want to try unplugging it while you work.

bobbywatson 09-05-2011 03:17 PM

Random thoughts on drawing
 
I did not know where to put this. I thought this thread would probably get more traffic than my own thread, so here it is. Not sure exactly what I am expecting from this, but we'll see. Hopefully someone smarter than me will have ideas! And while in my case this post applies to drawing, I believe it can be used for most artistic endeavours. Or cooking. Or work. Pretty much anything, actually.

I guess this is mostly directed toward those on this board who have "mastered" the art of drawing. (By "mastered", I mean who are professional artists, or have published art somewhere. I am aware of the fact that drawing can never actually be completely "mastered". )

Here's the question: how did you manage to get to that level? How do you keep the motivation level high?

My current dilemma: I like drawing. Always have. I've been somewhat serious about it ever since high school. (My first career choice was comic book artist, but my parents did a pretty good job of steering me away from it.) I would rate my current level as "not bad". I want to think that what I can currently do is better than what most people can achieve. But it's nowhere near as good as I would like it to be. I actually gave up on ever becoming "good" at it at some point in my life, and looking back at it now, it feels like the biggest mistake I've ever made.

Which brings me back to the question: how do you go from being "not bad" to being "good"? The obvious answer is "observe and practice". From what I understand, this "observe and practice" almost needs to become an obsession (or something closer to a second job) if one wants to achieve a reasonable level. But in doing so, I'm wondering: Does the fun that one gets out of drawing not go away? And if it does, does it eventually come back?

mr_bungle700 09-05-2011 04:33 PM

I don't know anything about drawing (I tried, I failed), but I do know lots about music and yes, getting good at something involves daily practice and a focused attempt to always be improving. You should always be working on something just above the level of what you're capable of, so that you will continue to grow.

Does it ever stop being fun? Perhaps, sometimes, temporarily. Never for me, but I'm sure it happens to some people. However, in my experience the better you get at the thing you love the more fun it becomes, because with greater levels of skill come more opportunities to do awesome things.

Traumadore 09-09-2011 12:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bobbywatson (Post 1144132)
Here's the question: how did you manage to get to that level? How do you keep the motivation level high?

how do you go from being "not bad" to being "good"? The obvious answer is "observe and practice". From what I understand, this "observe and practice" almost needs to become an obsession (or something closer to a second job) if one wants to achieve a reasonable level. But in doing so, I'm wondering: Does the fun that one gets out of drawing not go away? And if it does, does it eventually come back?

Yeah you pretty much have it with the "observe and practice" but I think that's really simplified and de-humanized and anyone who says that isn't really telling you anything. Everyone has their own growth processes, and they change over time as well. You need to be able to understand yourself to trigger the desire to create.

For instance, my art making patterns have been:

Early, age 7-18: Practice drawing for hours everyday while in classes as an escape from boredom. Draw only once a week or so at home. Linear improvement on very focused themes and subjects that were practiced.

Mid, age 18-23: Create during prescribed studio class times and in between classes. Ingrained processes and materials are irrelevent or attacked by instructors actively. Sketchbooks are rich, but finished artwork is much worse, even though a lot is produced in a great variety of media, most of it is a dead-end.

Late, age 23-27: Settled in to a pattern of synthesis and creation, phases becoming more compressed as time goes on. During a period of artistic non-productivity I still pay attention, journal, read books, research etc. until the pressure to create overwhelms the relaxed state. Then there is a period of prolific art making usually inspired by some of these new ideas. The first such cycle after graduating took maybe 9 months! The most recent was 3 weeks.

I don't know if this helps but I believe understanding how you grow is paramount to cultivating a skill, and everyone is different. When I was in 7th grade I went through probably my first "down" cycle where nothing was turning out right and I didn't have the patience to see a drawing through. I panicked. I cried. In public. On a bus full full of my classmates on a 5 hour drive for a 3 day stay at Wolf Ridge Environmental Learning Center. Good times. But a couple weeks later when I picked up the pencil again It was amazing. I was drawing better than ever. I guess one expects their skills to atrophy when they aren't used, but your brain is always learning and synthesizing. Now I don't panic when every drawing I start goes to crap. I know what's happening, it's just a part of how I learn. So I use that time to look at art, watch movies, read, etc. to enrich it.

I think it's valuable to be able to analyze your own history thus, maybe it will help you identify the patterns art creates in your life. The reassuring thing: you will never get worse at art as you get older. The rust can be knocked off in days, if not hours, meanwhile you're fortified by every experience you have, and every minute your brain is alive.

Now all that is about things you can't decide. You are stuck with yourself after all. What you can decide to do is take risks. Draw something you don't think you can draw. Draw something that doesn't exist until it looks like it could. Paint with something weird. Spend 100 hours making something that might fail. Make a thing you think is boring into something that isn't. Make what you want and screw "the audience".

The other decisions you have to make regard materials and processes. You need to seek out the best for what your needs are. It doesn't mean the most expensive, it just means the right ones. That "middle era" where I was in art school generally sucked aside from the fact that I was forced to experiment with a lot of tools I wouldn't have considered before then. Maybe if I didn't I would still be doing pencil drawings with watercolor and that's all. I made some great, weird, wild watercolors at the end of highschool, but I'm glad I tried so much more since. Now I use all that, and gouache, acrylic, markers, inks, printmaking, digital paint, collage and photomontage. There's also an enormous amount of materials I just gave away because I didn't like them. When you go to the art supply store, pick up something new, in addition to all the refills and such you already know you like.

Anyway, your questions brought up a lot of thoughts I didn't know I had at the moment. I hope this sheds some light on the quest to be "good". I'm still on it myself, so I would love to hear some other people's experiences.

Sanagi 09-09-2011 05:04 PM

I used to think that I wanted to draw for a living, but I admitted to myself that I didn't care enough to practice. So I just do it for fun.

bobbywatson 09-21-2012 11:54 AM

Here I am, reviving another thread... Oh well...

Anyway, this is probably more of a technical question.

Let me start with a bit of history: I moved into my house two years ago. There is a wall in here that is very high (like, 14 feet high or something) and, well, it's empty and boring. I looked in home decoration stores for something to put on it, but all the paintings I found were either bland, boring or flowers.

Since I could not find anything that I actually wanted to put on the wall, I started thinking "Hey, I could do the paintings myself!" It turned out that's not exactly practical: I like drawing, but painting is not really my thing (I gave it a shot, I've got canvases with paint on it to prove it). (Maybe acrylic colors would be a better choice for me, but I'm not sure I want to try it.)

Anyway, fast-forward to today: I actually have an idea of what I want to put on that wall (two different images, one of them featuring female characters, one of them featuring male characters, both taking place in something similar to antiquity's public baths, with mostly warm colors, a width of 12 inches and a height of 36 inches). I have already started working on one of them (the one featuring women).

What I plan to do is this: draw the characters by hand, scan them at high resolution, and then assemble and paint everything in GIMP. Once the work is done, my idea is to have it printed on actual canvases and have them framed.

Now, here are the technical questions:
  • What's a good resolution to work with? I'm thinking 600 DPI is enough, but feel free to tell me I'm wrong
  • What about color profiles? I believe there is some basic support for the CYMK color model in GIMP, but I'm pretty sure that this support is nothing compared to Photoshop's. I just don't want to spend all that time on the image and then see it come out looking like crap after it's printed.
  • Printing on canvas: I know there is at least one place in town that does it, and there might be more. Now, how about durability of the color? Granted, the wall where I want to put the canvases does not see a lot of sunshine, so that would probably help preserve the color. Even so, is this a technique that can produce nice results? Or should I just forget about the whole thing because, wherever I get it printed, it will look like crap?

(Also, if anyone is curious, I will probably put samples in my thread as the images move forward.)

Traumadore 09-21-2012 12:48 PM

300dpi is adequate for print. 600dpi is only necessary for extremely fine lineart or rasterized type situations.

If you can set color profiles in GIMP before you start working it should be fine. You could always move to photoshop later if you need to do a lot of color profile work. I don't think you'll need to. And switching from RGB to CMYK will probably not change too much unless you're working with really saturated colors, which it doesn't sound like you will be.

Digital prints these days tend to last pretty long. If you have it under glass and not exposed to direct light it will probably hold up 50+ years minimum. The most likely reason for a print turning out like crap is that your screen is going to be way off from theirs, and their screens are matched to their printers. I would recommend going to a place that serves design and marketing firms and artists, not just any copy-shop that can print on canvas unless they're willing to print samples or redo it if it looks crap.

Also, I will vouch for acrylics. Oil paints take an immense period of time to do good work with unless you want to introduce even more toxic driers and lacquers. Most oil painters these days do that, because the alternative is waiting weeks or even months before you work on leaner layers and glazes. Another trend these days is really 'unfinished' oil paintings with a lot of canvas showing and primarily thin glazes and linear elements. I believe this is also influenced by time pressure to some extent.

Acrylic paints will operate in a much more familiar manner (to working digital) and with the many various additives can do some gorgeous stuff. I recommend Golden Acrylic brand.

And if you are considering doing some more painting, consider panels. Canvas painting was invented because wood panels and murals tended to hold up terribly in humid Mediterranean climates, but it became the default substrate for some reason. The amount of control you get on a panel is a lot greater if that's what you're looking for.

bobbywatson 09-21-2012 01:29 PM

My father is about to start working with acrylics. I might give it a try at some point.

Thank you very, very much for your advice! As always, it is much appreciated!

Alastor 10-16-2012 10:26 PM

Thread revival with a technical issue:

I'm looking to put together some slideshow videos with my own scripted commentary, and then upload them to Youtube.

That's the long-term goal, but right now I can't even take that first step because I just don't have any working knowledge of the kind of software that's right for the job. I've been poking and prodding around in Windows Movie Maker and it just overwhelms me that I can't do something as simple as, say, putting two images side by side in a frame, and calling that one slide. It seems I can only have one image per slide, stretched out into fullscreen pixelation. It's more than a little deflating.

I can't think of a better example of what my long-term goal looks like than this.

I hear Audacity is the perfect place to get started for sound recording. What slideshow software does it play nice with? I'm willing to accept that the probable answer to all of these questions and more is "Buy a Mac."

Thanks in advance.

Googleshng 10-16-2012 11:20 PM

Any reason you can't composite things side by side in a regular ol' art program in advance?

TK Flash 10-17-2012 04:10 AM

When this thread got bumped, I wondered whatever happened to Bobby's wall. Bobby?

bobbywatson 10-17-2012 09:54 AM

Working on it.

I encountered an issue with my computer: it did not have enough RAM to properly handle the size of the image. It now has 16 GB, which should be enough. (I also considered installing an SSD, but the computer is a Mac mini and I'm not a big fan of doing complicated surgery on the thing.)

I did some more work on the female figures, spent some of last week working on the architecture in Sketchup. I am currently in the process of reorganizing some rooms in my house, and that includes moving my drawing table.

In short: it's nowhere near done, but it's moving forward slowly. The fact that I was away on business for a while did not help.

Lady 10-17-2012 09:46 PM

Alastor, PowerPoint 2010 (mac) seems to have a Save as Movie option (.mov). OpenOffice has an option for Flash in its Export menu. Those might be easier to wrangle than Windows Movie Maker (which was what ultimately killed any desire of mine to create AMVs when I was young and impressionable)

Alastor 10-17-2012 09:48 PM

Yeah, I was thinking something along those lines. It occurred to me that I can't do with Windows Movie Maker today what I could easily do with PowerPoint several years ago.

Büge 10-25-2012 09:28 PM

What about one of those clear plastic pockets with the three-ring holes in them?

Lady 10-26-2012 08:34 AM

That was my first thought, but if it's one of those wire bound sketchbooks, you probably won't be able to do that.

what about a bunch of stamp hinges?


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