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ShakeWell

Slam Master
(he, etc.)
Part of why Leon works characterization-wise in RE4 is that he's fundamentally true to his RE2 incarnation in how people react to him. He was originally defined by no one listening or taking him seriously, ever, so there was a nice turnaround on the default entitlement usually afforded to leading men in fiction. 4 amps up his performance as a supposedly confident and suave proactive agent to support the fantasy of inhabiting that skillset in the game's over-the-top farce, but that core appeal is still present as for all his carefully practiced affectations he's still ridiculed by nearly everyone he meets, or shot down immediately for his Solid Snake come-ons. He is an empowered character but one who regularly takes pratfalls to land him on the better side of endearing as a result, possessing ample privilege to weather those blows. I'm not a very big fan of RE4 but RE8's simultaneous courting of its overall iconography and concepts and the tonal dissonance that resulted in made me take stock of what actually worked there both narratively and otherwise, in contrast. Whatever the older game is, I think it's a work of far clearer tonal confidence and clarity.

Ethan, in addition to everything discussed for how he's positioned in the story, is also on a personal level just kind of unpleasant which marks most of the modern writing associated with the series for me. I used to be drawn to RE because it was a horror cartoon, gruesome and gory, but at the same time tame and chaste. No one fucks, no one trades insults or uses profanity beyond a PG rating if even that. Over time, "maturity" has crept in in people throwing around their fucks and bitches and other really mean-spirited, barbed putdowns. Ethan's one-liners aren't even good but they still feel like they have to punctuate every boss encounter's conclusion with them, and it especially rankles with characters like Moreau who are so obviously victims of something larger than themselves and they're not afforded anything but base insults for their appearance and circumstances from the player avatar. They're not supposed to make me resent Ethan or have his actions serve as a criticism of him as all the concerns of the storytelling are in strict idolatry of his motivations and drive to go on, yet I've never felt as hollow inhabiting any other character in the series as a result of the writing itself.

Doesn't he actually say something that almost approaches sympathy about Moreau after that fight? I don't remember and it didn't land, but I feel like they made the most perfunctory effort possible. I thought Ethan was fine in RE7 as a kind of everyman cypher. Like, yeah, usually it's cops, or special cops, or soldiers, or whatever who deal with this stuff, but how about this REGULAR-ASS DUDE? He's fighting mold monsters! He's confused by hidden doorways and keys with dumb shit stapled to them! But in 8 there's a moment early on, when you're at the house with all the survivors where he practically quotes Die Hard 2: Die Harder saying something about "how can the same thing happen to the same guy twice?!" And at that point I just... kinda stop being invested in him as a character?

As for Leon, he feels like a slightly less-dorky Ash Williams in RE4. In fact, Leon kinda makes the jump from Evil Dead Ash to Army of Darkness Ash from 2 to 4, without a stopover at Evil Dead 2 Ash (which is a shame, really). But they've honestly gone and fucked him up, too. I didn't like 6 for a multitude of reasons, most of which related to the terrible Design-by-Committee feel (which RE8 honestly also has, to an extent, but at least the HUD doesn't change from section to section), but boy, did I ever hate "Serious Action Hero Leon S. Kennedy" a whole lot. And if he's like that (similar to how he looks in that new Netflix show or movie or whatever it is) in this rumored RE4make, boy, that will sap a lot of the fun out of it. (I hope they have enough sense to not do that. They kept him a naive little baby in RE2K19, so hopefully they stick to what worked in a potential RE4make.)
 

Peklo

Oh! Create!
(they/them, she/her)
Doesn't he actually say something that almost approaches sympathy about Moreau after that fight? I don't remember and it didn't land, but I feel like they made the most perfunctory effort possible.

The opposite. The quote is, verbatim: "In death as he was in life. Disgusting." I think the character is badly handled by the narrative anyway and through the protagonist who is so laboriously emphasized as a point of identification they could've mediated that, but instead they just doubled down.
 

Gaer

chat.exe a cessé de fonctionner
Staff member
Moderator
I used to be drawn to RE because it was a horror cartoon, gruesome and gory, but at the same time tame and chaste. No one fucks, no one trades insults or uses profanity beyond a PG rating if even that. Over time, "maturity" has crept in in people throwing around their fucks and bitches and other really mean-spirited, barbed putdowns.

This is it. This is the exact reason I used to love RE so much. And why I bounced off everything after RE4 (which did not endear me via play style rather than an issue with plot or characterization).
 

ShakeWell

Slam Master
(he, etc.)
The opposite. The quote is, verbatim: "In death as he was in life. Disgusting." I think the character is badly handled by the narrative anyway and through the protagonist who is so laboriously emphasized as a point of identification they could've mediated that, but instead they just doubled down.

Oh, shit, yeah. Maybe I was just hoping he'd say something not shitty.
 

Pajaro Pete

(He/Himbo)
to be fair that character does explicitly try to prey on ethan's sympathies to trick him and then spends the rest of the sequence tryign to murder him, and also gleefully experimented on villagers
 

MetManMas

Me and My Bestie
(He, him)
I used to be drawn to RE because it was a horror cartoon, gruesome and gory, but at the same time tame and chaste. No one fucks, no one trades insults or uses profanity beyond a PG rating if even that. Over time, "maturity" has crept in in people throwing around their fucks and bitches and other really mean-spirited, barbed putdowns.
I can relate to this so much.

And this is certainly not exclusive to Resident Evil, either. Lots of games and ongoing series have become more and more distasteful and mean-spirited over the years. And on top of that advances in technology have allowed for much more horrifyingly realistic graphic violence compared to the cartoonish abstractions of low-res sprites and low-poly models.

Knowing exactly what kinda horrifying nightmares I'm in for if I buy a modern T to M-rated game is why I have no problem with looking up spoilers.
 

Peklo

Oh! Create!
(they/them, she/her)
to be fair that character does explicitly try to prey on ethan's sympathies to trick him and then spends the rest of the sequence tryign to murder him, and also gleefully experimented on villagers

He's also a complete thrall to Miranda, and far more bound by his bodily condition and transformation than his "siblings", who exercise nominal or total control over their fancy megamycete superpowers--Moreau gets uncontrollable vomiting spasms and disfigurations instead. RE7 went through so much to establish that all this mold magic that the new school of BOW tech in the series hinges on will invariably completely change the nature of a person and subject them to the subservience of whatever master consciousness there is at the heart of the given hivemind, turning "good people" like the Bakers (Lucas is Lucas) into cackling sadists and murderers. All of Miranda's "children" are kidnapping victims subject to life imprisonment and the fulfillment of her will as she goes about her century-long eugenics program to weed out potential hosts, allowed to retain some autonomy to facilitate infighting for I guess her entertainment and to see who might overcome who in those squabbles. Does she know Heisenberg is literally manufacturing a rebellion in her backyard? If the writing has any consistency at all, I can't imagine how she could not, so she probably just finds it amusing to watch him flail and whimper against his fate. The point is that for all the interactions Ethan has with the Mother Miranda cult, there's no point where he or us should assume we're actually seeing these people as they are or as how they would be if they hadn't been indoctrinated and enslaved by an evil fungus. We know it as an audience, he knows it very damn explicitly through everything he learned and saw in the last game. Under that light, I don't understand the character's callousness at all toward people and a community who are trapped in the same situation his own wife was (who is less than innocent to begin with for taking part in the development and grooming of child bioweapons before any infection of her own, yet she has all of Ethan's empathy).

I loved old RE stories because they were colourful schlock and for all that ostensible narrative slightness or even ineptitude as it has been portrayed the characters' emotive realities as much bearing or prominence as they had were always treated accordingly to the tone of the storytelling. With the Ethan games especially there is a drive to make these games into "prestige" drama exercises which in my mind is a pejorative directly connected to the empathy reserved for dads and dads only that these stories toil in, while the actual plotting and reasoning powering these shifts and moves is as hackneyed and inconsistent as ever, but now taken to a monumental sense of self-importance that creates an irreconcilable rift in how seriously the games would like to be taken and how immature in every way they are about achieving those ends. It's very much the worst of both worlds for me.
 
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Part of why Leon works characterization-wise in RE4 is that he's fundamentally true to his RE2 incarnation in how people react to him. He was originally defined by no one listening or taking him seriously, ever, so there was a nice turnaround on the default entitlement usually afforded to leading men in fiction. 4 amps up his performance as a supposedly confident and suave proactive agent to support the fantasy of inhabiting that skillset in the game's over-the-top farce, but that core appeal is still present as for all his carefully practiced affectations he's still ridiculed by nearly everyone he meets, or shot down immediately for his Solid Snake come-ons. He is an empowered character but one who regularly takes pratfalls to land him on the better side of endearing as a result, possessing ample privilege to weather those blows. I'm not a very big fan of RE4 but RE8's simultaneous courting of its overall iconography and concepts and the tonal dissonance that resulted in made me take stock of what actually worked there both narratively and otherwise, in contrast. Whatever the older game is, I think it's a work of far clearer tonal confidence and clarity.

Ethan, in addition to everything discussed for how he's positioned in the story, is also on a personal level just kind of unpleasant which marks most of the modern writing associated with the series for me. I used to be drawn to RE because it was a horror cartoon, gruesome and gory, but at the same time tame and chaste. No one fucks, no one trades insults or uses profanity beyond a PG rating if even that. Over time, "maturity" has crept in in people throwing around their fucks and bitches and other really mean-spirited, barbed putdowns. Ethan's one-liners aren't even good but they still feel like they have to punctuate every boss encounter's conclusion with them, and it especially rankles with characters like Moreau who are so obviously victims of something larger than themselves and they're not afforded anything but base insults for their appearance and circumstances from the player avatar. They're not supposed to make me resent Ethan or have his actions serve as a criticism of him as all the concerns of the storytelling are in strict idolatry of his motivations and drive to go on, yet I've never felt as hollow inhabiting any other character in the series as a result of the writing itself.
Interesting

Moreau is one of my highlights, because he is so unconfident then over compensates. Charging at Ethan "I'm the best!". It was pretty sad!

How do you feel about Leon's portrayal in 6, where he is now super serious bad ass?
 

Peklo

Oh! Create!
(they/them, she/her)
I don't know! 6 is just about the only series game I haven't played beyond an hour or two, so anything I said would just be conjecture. I might try it in earnest someday.
 
I quite like it, but the Leon stuff feels weird. I think the Chris stuff is quite good! The Wesker Jr stuff, didnt happen.

Actually
At end of 6, post credits, Wesk jr (the kids can call him WeskJu) is shown being this world travelling bioweapon super hero fighter, like he's Dante or something. I get similar vibes from end of 8 where Rose is being kept probably for that purpose. In any event I hate both of these threads
 

Pajaro Pete

(He/Himbo)
More-o on Moreau:
i guess i just don't see that character as being particularly different from basically any other enemy you fight in a resident evil game, who largely consist of regular folks who have been infected by something, except instead of being a mindless monster acing on instinct, he has the cognitive ability to commit deception and talk about how he unconditionally support Miranda (though I suppose his unconditional support of Miranda is acting on instinct). He's a victim, but so are all the Lycans and Servants in the Castle and the Soldats, and all the Molded from RE7, and the Villagers in RE4, and all the Zombies RE1, 2, and 3.

i dunno, the franchise has never really extended empathy to enemies unless a main character knew them before they turned (in which case it becomes an old yeller moment)
 

Pajaro Pete

(He/Himbo)
I quite like it, but the Leon stuff feels weird. I think the Chris stuff is quite good! The Wesker Jr stuff, didnt happen.

i've been slowly trying to make my way through 6 for like half a year now, chris's story is incredible because it shows the actual use-case scenario for BOWs and it involves.... sending BOWs with military body armor and military weaponry to go shoot things, and then occasionally dropping massive BOWS into cities using military helicopters, and at some point i'm just like, how is this more effective than just regular bombing? in the previous games the outbreaks were experimentation, or accidents, so you don't really have to try and rationalize the actual efficacy of using BOW, but here....
(i'll get around to jake and ada's games eventually......)
 

Ludendorkk

(he/him)
Resident Evil 6's story makes 8's look like a model of coherence, just every bad tendency in RE writing set to blast in an endless buffet
 

Peklo

Oh! Create!
(they/them, she/her)
It's a different proposition to me to consider how the series protagonists react to their circumstances and the things they have to violently confront when the deliberate subversion of who Ethan's supposed to be exists and what he represents as a point of view character from the series norms: everyone understands he's framed as an "everyman"; that's supposed to be the hook. In that sense, the expectation (or hope) would be for him to take in whatever he comes up against in a different light, in absence of being a trained military professional sent to a hostile environment with the understanding that violence will occur. Even the most fish-out-of-water characters in the series in RE2 Leon and Claire are already entrenched in either the police force or having grown up in a military family which contextualizes their adjustment to exceptional duress and goes with the tone of those earlier stories. Ethan is presented as this very painstakingly literal blank slate to project onto all the audience's hoary "who builds this shit" anti-humour about RE-style contrivances so they can throw that self-referentiality in and the series identity under the bus in the name of "self-awareness" even as they obsess over it, and he's also supposed to be a break from the decades of series mythology and narrative cruft that most people usually only define as a detriment. There's way more weight in his portrayal in the specific context that these new games position themselves as, and it's just completely baffling to me that they still futilely try to slot him into the "blast a baddie and quip about it" model that nothing suggests the character to be nor does it benefit the narrative aims of the games.
 

ShakeWell

Slam Master
(he, etc.)
With the Ethan games especially there is a drive to make these games into "prestige" drama exercises which in my mind is a pejorative directly connected to the empathy reserved for dads and dads only that these stories toil in, while the actual plotting and reasoning powering these shifts and moves is as hackneyed and inconsistent as ever, but now taken to a monumental sense of self-importance that creates an irreconcilable rift in how seriously the games would like to be taken and how immature in every way they are about achieving those ends. It's very much the worst of both worlds for me.

RE8 is A Quiet Place. Or, perhaps to a lesser-degree, The Rental. These were films that were pushed as some kind of elevated horror (I can talk later about how much I hate that fucking term) because they were made by people who did not typically dabble in horror (John Krasinski and Dave Franco, respectively) but are well-known in the mainstream. People absolutely fawned over A Quite Place, a film I hate more the further I get from it, because HOW DID ALL OF THE WORLD'S MILITARY POWERS NOT FIGURE OUT THE MONSTERS WITH GOOD HEARING CAN BE KILL WITH LOUD HIGH FREQUENCY SOUNDS? THEY NEVER TRIED THAT?! It is an adequate creature-feature that has one genuinely great tense sequence, but asks the audience to go along with, well, yes, Sad Dad stuff, but also just a lot of frankly unearned pathos because at the core of it, it's a movie about big ugly monsters that kill you if they hear you.

As I said above, I feel like RE8 (and to a lesser extent, RE7) is trying to do the same thing. There are a bunch of story beats that don't feel earned, but the game wants me to have some big emotional response right after Vampire Mommy turns into a dragon centaur thing or whatever, and... nah. It just feels like this game in particular wants to have its cake and eat it, too. "Here's a silly 9' Vampire Lady. But also get SAD DAD FEELZ." And I'm not saying that's impossible, necessarily, but it takes an incredibly skilled hand to pull it off (Edgar Wright manages it in Shaun of the Dead, for example). You can be scary and silly in alternating doses, but adding gravitas is a whole other thing and this game's writing falls WAY short of that.

Speaking of the writing, I started play #2 in earnest last night, and boy, the game sure doesn't do a goshdarn thing with the whole cult angle, does it? Like, very early game spoilers here, but you go to Luiza's house after the first attack, there are survivors there, they all worship Mother Miranda, even praying to her with Ethan, but all of that is COMPLETELY unexplored because everyone who isn't a moldy werewolf gets 86'd in that sequence. Also, the young woman whose dad gets wolfy in that sequence tells you Dimitrescu Castle is a place "full of blood and death," but if the Four Lords were hand-picked by Mother Miranda... why would she view it that way? Again, it's moot because they all fucking die, and there's no grappling with or understanding how the normal people here view Miranda or the Lords, and it honestly kinda feels like a waste to even have the survivors there. You don't have time to get attached to them, they just die immediately, and they provide no insight to anything.
 

Ludendorkk

(he/him)
Honest the entire first part of the game up until you enter the castle feels like it was supposed to be another game, introducing a bunch of shit that doesn't matter (how much cooler would it have been if you had to interact with villagers throughout the game, whoops they are all dead now). Hell, the fact that the village has been overrun with werewolves is barely relevant to the plot, and that's the game's damn hook!

And bringing back to Moreau, much like Dimitrescu it feels the audience at large took away something completely different than what the writers intended
 

Peklo

Oh! Create!
(they/them, she/her)
Open spoiler talk once again about a pre-eminent subject with this game that I've sort of talked around up until now.

If it seems inconspicuous at all that for all the extended thoughts I've relayed about the game that none have been specifically about Alcina Dimitrescu... well, it's partly because I think the character warrants a post-mortem of her own, and the other reason is just that I'm tired: tired of the way they chose her to dominate the game's marketing, and how that enterprise was expressed. It's happened before, when Nier: Automata's ubiquitously sexualized android women were picked up as the thing the game would be colloquially known for upon first contact with it. Things like these, what people will latch onto, are partly uncontrollable, but the deliberate catalyst for those obsessions exists in the visual designs and presentation of the subject matter, so they're also not accidental; Yoko Taro or whoever on high decided to want sexy and leered at women in his game, the character designer in Akihiko Yoshida concurred, and the rest was just momentum. The worst of it is when even for all this deliberate staging, the company or creator calling the shots take part in the public performance, and bestow legitimacy, permission and encouragement on the gleeful objectification taking place--Taro did it with his calls for .zip files full of porn and more; Capcom at large did it with their entire latter marketing focus with Village. It changes the dynamic from an audience with expected bad actors in it to dropping the veil on the intentions of just what the takeaway is supposed to be here: to be aroused freely and exchange those high-fives with the highest authority looking on in approval.

It's not like Dimitrescu could be ignored as a sexualized character since so much of that is built-in from the start. The foremost visual model for the character is the modern day Internet urban legend Hachishaku-sama, rumours of whom started percolating outward from communities like 2ch around 2008. A little later elsewhere in the world, Slender Man would be conceptualized, and the two have their share of similarities: impossibly tall specters lurking about the fringes of mundane normalcy, on the periphery of scenes where they might engage in their child-snatching and spiriting away. Unlike Slender Man, who's designed to be anonymous to the point of nothingness, Hachishaku-sama mixes the traditional ghost story trappings and behaviour with an "attractive" exterior, of a superficially beautiful giant woman garbed in an airy summer dress whose menace is only revealed when she already has you in her clutches. This, coupled with her explicit focus in stalking children and the knowledge of just what kind of community conceived of her in the first place makes it fairly transparently clear that aspects of horror were secondary to who she is and what her purpose as a cult figure is supposed to be: she is pure distilled fetish, a glamourized vision of a hot older woman forcing herself on children, with all the kinks suggested by that having been exploited time and time again in pornography that's sprung up around the character. Dimitrescu borrows her stature, her stalking premise, her dress code--and yes, the explicit sexualization, so the fundamental influence molding the character doesn't really leave room for her to be anything else, opportunistic marketing or not.

Sexuality is so emphasized with Dimitrescu that it's difficult to see her for anything more than that in how the game presents her and what associations it makes. Kikuko Inoue voices her in Japanese, and if you want your pop culture allusions from that direction you could easily point to Inoue's other role as another performatively sultry character in Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood's Lust--a literal incarnation of sex whose signature maneuver is the hyperextension and hardening of her nails or fingers into matter-shredding talons, something Dimitrescu does to identical fashion and effect. The first-person camera that defines the Ethan games is directed to always focus on her cleavage in any scene she's in, for optimal framing of her body; similarly the voyeur scene outside her bedchambers is staged to provide extreme close-up views of all the contours of her body otherwise impossible to accomplish in face-to-face interactions. Village isn't a game that cares much for assigning its cast and characters specific ages, as it has hazy chronology around the community it's set in that it's not too invested in exploring down to minutiae--but it does provide an exceptional, convenient file for the explicit purpose of assigning a specific number to outline Dimitrescu's effective physical age when her infection took hold and she stopped changing outwardly (she is 44); there's nothing else to surmise with this footnote than an attempt to push the fetish angle even harder with relevant datapoints--they might as well be listing her three sizes. If the marketing seemed overbearing to the point of parody in how it portrayed her, the reality of it turned out that her role in the game reflects that single-minded reductive instinct very faithfully.

Of course, Dimitrescu's not just a facsimile of modern day pop culture--Village thinks itself a dark fairy tale, set in an apocryphal and plausiby deniable vague "Europe" as its model RE4 did... only now instead of a caricature of Spain we have an analogous Romania, with all its relevant folk tales, myths and cultural export touchstones serving as fodder for the new strains of series explorations of "horror." Thus, we have a thematically sound werewolf virus, and some good old outdated Eastern Bloc industrialization anxiety filtered through Tetsuo: The Iron Man in other local horror sideshows, and many more seeming genre anthology expressions, but the most prominent is Dimitrescu's domain in the vampire myth which she very neatly occupies in nearly everything she is. Her bloodlust's rationalized by the game's internal pseudoscience as a hereditary blood disease mutated further into a dependency on blood for sustenance by the virus that grants her her abilities; her abode is just the right kind of aristocratic and old world to read as oppressing; she has her coven of "daughters" to propagate her will wantonly within her demesne. It's all there, and as far as expressions of vampirism in media go, it's subject to the genre's pervasive, boring subtexts in the ways that have been popularized by mostly Victorian English dudes writing about their mistrust and loathing of women, of queer people, of the foreign invader. Dimitrescu is Dracula; she's Carmilla; she's Erzsébet Báthory in all the ways that don't really say anything at all about the subject matter except repeat the legends of bigotry that fuel their staying power in culture at large.

The trappings of lesbian vampires are so omnipresent in her and her daughters and everything they do that the impression is that a thematic payoff must come at some point, yet it never does. All the game ever does with it is borrow the easy iconography of predatory lesbians decadently imprisoning, torturing and consuming innocent young women by the dozens or hundreds, all the while framing that vaguely gay menace as going hand in hand with hating men in turn--the outbursts of "manflesh" really don't have any other bearing on what occurs except to underline the gendered intent. At the same time, Ethan is given the euphemistic response of labeling the feminine influence as "witches" as he fends them off--something no one actually says in the regular Joe model the character's voice is supposed to follow, nor given to precedent in the prior game or even elsewhere in this one. It's a self-censoring convention that occurs in media when actual profanity is intended or wanted to be uttered, but can't be or as in this case, is abstained from for reasons that can only be guessed at--perhaps to weakly frame Ethan as more heroic going through his eventual arc, with the literal "bitch" utterances left to more malicious characters to spit out. At the end, when the calcified remains of Dimitrescu's body are in Ethan's pocket as a war trophy and trinket to be sold, the living contrivance of a game function made into a half-hearted character in the Duke comments upon her attractiveness even in death--leering at the shape of what is her corpse, which remains sexualized in its figure-like form, available for the player to view and rotate around through the game's interface. That's about as lingering a statement as could be made of what purpose Lady Dimitrescu was ever meant to serve in this story.

But what about outside of the textual narrative? Dimitrescu is after all positioned as the latest in the long line, especially present in the modern RE era, of the implacable stalker figure--discussed narratively earlier, but also embodied mechanically. Jack Baker and the "Mr. X" Tyrant in their respective games garnered near-total terror-laden appreciation from audiences at large because of either the camp characterization or how the design of their encounters and presence in the game world defined the play experience for nearly everyone that ever interacted with those games. This was in my mind the one avenue left for "redeeming" Dimitrescu as to what kind of legacy she might leave behind when the dust had settled and evaluations been made, and the crying shame of it is that she's likely the least compelling execution of the shared concept made in the series, at least in this modern run. It's arresting when you first see her in all her visage from a live feed of existing in the same space as her, outside of a predetermined cinematic; an incomparably huge shape closing in. When the initial shock fades, more and more seams begin to unravel around the entire presentation: the sparse population of the castle with other threats that prevent her from acting as an unpredictable pressuring wall pushing you into danger zones, as Mr. X might have. The overall layout of the castle itself, with empty loops circling the main hall where she lingers nearly all of her screentime, providing easy and safe escape routes that never allow her to really dominate the environment with her presence--a coffee table alone will stymie her. Her daughters while in some way replicating her danger on a smaller scale, also exist as very binary, scripted figures--you'll run or you'll die, with risking resources to hold them off never being a valid or valuable strategy or decision to weigh, as they simply have no effect, temporarily or otherwise. Everything about Dimitrescu's use in this ostensible marquee heritage role is underdeveloped, slapdash and worst of all, ineffective--an impression that through its conception has made its inroads in defining the entire character, both mechanically and narratively.

I don't think Alcina Dimitrescu as she is exists as a solitary case of a character done dirty by her own existence: to me she is more of a symptom of a generalized ill intent, bad ideas and sidelining that exists in the game and its writing. For as much as she defined the game's promotional image, I guess that's truth in advertising.
 
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Adrenaline

Post Reader
(He/Him)
I played this for a little bit. I have the two key items to open the gate to the castle but I haven't used them yet. I like it so far! Heard some weird things! We'll see what happens!
 

ShakeWell

Slam Master
(he, etc.)
Been spending some time with Mercs. I like it, but it doesn't have its hooks in me the way RE4 or RE5 Mercs did. I think part of it is (minor spoilers for a bonus mode, I guess?) you only play as Ethan. I was honestly hoping for a first-person Leon or Wesker or HUNK with individual abilities. You do get abilities, but they all come from pickups you find and are randomized, like there's some influence from the popularity of roguelikes. It's fine, I mean, you get stuff for SS ranking all of the stages, so I'm gonna have to do that, I guess, but I was honestly hoping for a little more.
 

Adrenaline

Post Reader
(He/Him)
I think I'm near the end of the castle. Really digging the game although I would be happy if the next RE doesn't have unstoppable boss enemies that follow you around.
 

ShakeWell

Slam Master
(he, etc.)
I think I'm near the end of the castle. Really digging the game although I would be happy if the next RE doesn't have unstoppable boss enemies that follow you around.

I've honestly been pretty persistently disappointed that none have stuck around as long or been as effective as Mr. X.
 

Adrenaline

Post Reader
(He/Him)
Mr. X worked but I don't think it needs to be in every game. This is the fourth RE game in a row with boss enemies that follow you around!

I'm in the indie psychological horror game level (House Beneviento)
 

ShakeWell

Slam Master
(he, etc.)
Mr. X worked but I don't think it needs to be in every game. This is the fourth RE game in a row with boss enemies that follow you around!

Agreed! But if it is, commit to the bit!

Also, wow, Mercs is something when you wind around to the harder versions of the stages.
 

Adrenaline

Post Reader
(He/Him)
Okay, I finished it. When Ethan got his heart pulled out and you start playing at Chris, I was worried that I had went the whole game without using the magnum, but then the final bit happened and it ended up not being a waste to save the ammo for the end. I really liked the game overall. Exploring the village, the variety in the different areas, the combat, the boss fights, that stuff's all great. The story and writing are horrible but I don't think that's anything new for the series. I did notice that Miranda was referred to as a bitch about 50 times, and I would agree that the gender stuff in this game is worse than usual, and Ethan is a bad character, and all that... but the game parts are about as good as the series gets. It's not an all-time classic but it was good.
 

ShakeWell

Slam Master
(he, etc.)
Only one Mercs stage left to Double-S before I can get the LZ Answerer, a.k.a. the Lightsaber.
 

ShakeWell

Slam Master
(he, etc.)
Only one Mercs stage left to Double-S before I can get the LZ Answerer, a.k.a. the Lightsaber.

I did it. I stayed up too late last night to do it, but I did it. And I'm never touching fucking Mercs in this game again, unless they add more characters who can do non-Ethan things in DLC.
 

R.R. Bigman

Coolest Guy
I bought the vanilla version of RE8 at Target by mistake, so now I’ll have to buy the Winter’s Expansion to get the bonus stuff. I have a harder time purchasing Resident Evil games than I do playing through them.
 

R.R. Bigman

Coolest Guy
I‘m playing on Hardcore, so I shouldn’t be too shocked, but the big Lycan assault took me over an hour to get through. I had no idea what to do, or where to go. I’m not sure what I did to end the event, as I was mid death animation when it cut to a weird cutscene with a different group of wolf people, followed by everyone leaving abruptly. Sure as hell isn’t as memorable as everyone in town going to bingo after fighting off Dr. Salvador in RE4.

Speaking of, is this whole game going to be RE4, but they say “fuck” and you lose control of your character way too often?
 
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