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"The Great Ace Attorney Chronicles" will be released on Switch, PS4, and Steam on July 27 (in English)

Violentvixen

(She/Her)
This is only $25 as part of the Nintendo Golden week sale!

I haven't been in a puzzle/mystery solving brain place for a while so I took a break from the game but started it back up, excited to continue this.
 

Phantoon

I cuss you bad
I need to get back to this. In my defence, I'm playing Spirit of Justice, but I can't wait to get back to it.
 

MCBanjoMike

Infamous third lava dolphin
(He/him)
I'm still holding out for an iOS release, since I really want to be able to play these games anywhere I go and I don't tend to bring my Switch on my daily outings. AA5 and 6 made for wonderful phone games, and I know these have been released on phones in Japan already, so I've got my fingers crossed.
 

Dark Medusa

Diamond Crusader
(He/they)
This might be the best AA that has ever been made.
For the record, I agree. I'm still partial to the original trilogy for many reasons, but I really loved these two games (but especially the second). Even the music is memorable, which is something I feel the most recent games have been lacking!
 

Mogri

Round and round I go
(he)
Staff member
Moderator
That's quite an achievement, there's been some incredible stuff in this series 😮
(disclaimer: I'm currently on the last case of GAA1)

For me, AA3 is the next contender, and GAA cleanly beats it. I think post-Apollo, the series becomes a bit diluted with the wide cast -- we've got three attorneys who all need their time in the spotlight, but let's not forget Blackquill and Edgeworth, who must appear in every game. The later games still hit some incredible highs (the final case of Spirit of Justice is wonderful, particularly Phoenix vs Apollo), but they do so in spite of their baggage.

Freed from all of that, and with a new setting that works very much to its advantage, GAA focuses on a tighter cast with a new structure. None of the cases feels like filler (the way, for example, SoJ's udon case very much does), and as Sholmes's deductions breathe life into the investigations, so do the jury interactions enliven the courtroom proceedings.

My only complaint with GAA is that Iris gives me some Wesley Crusher vibes, but every AA is mandated by international law to have at least one unbearable character. (It's not Iris, though. It's the defendant from case 4.)
 

Dark Medusa

Diamond Crusader
(He/they)
I'll put in my case saying that GAA1, especially the final case, does good setup but aren't particularly great on their own merits. GAA2 spikes a lot of those setups and therefore feels like the better game, but really it just makes more sense to consider 1 and 2 as one game of its own... which is exactly what we got! Fantastic!
 
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I haven't been in a puzzle/mystery solving brain place for a while so I took a break from the game but started it back up, excited to continue this.
Same. Brain space has been bad lately, but I really wanna get back into it. Also, this thread today makes my heart glow. 🥰 GAA pinnacle of the franchise, hope they give Shu more work.

I think post-Apollo, the series becomes a bit diluted with the wide cast -- we've got three attorneys who all need their time in the spotlight, but let's not forget Blackquill and Edgeworth, who must appear in every game. The later games still hit some incredible highs (the final case of Spirit of Justice is wonderful, particularly Phoenix vs Apollo), but they do so in spite of their baggage.
I can get behind this. I know people liked Phoenix and wanted him back, and 5 and 6 had some really good moments with him, but having to split MC duties with at least two other deserving characters was a detriment to all three. Apollo getting sidelined in 5, and then Athena in 6 just felt bad because I wanted both to be a bigger part of the games and there just wasn't enough real room for either. Also, the writer for 5 and 6 was the same as the guy who did the Investigations games. He's a decent stand-in for Shu Takumi, but never could manage to make the twists as clever or engaging as Shu did.
 

Isrieri

My father told me this would happen
I'm a die-hard fan of the Ace Attorney series, however I've never actually played any of the games myself. This is a travesty. So I decided to give myself a birthday gift and finished the first two cases last night. Best decision I've made in many months. It turns out that when you're the one pulling the strings and doing the legwork, its a lot harder than it looks.

The first case might be the best opener of all the games. Well-written, with oodles of intrigue and deception. Multiple times I thought that at last I had it all figured out, and it just kept pulling fast ones. It wouldn't stop! Kazuma & Ryunosuke were the dream team. Prosecutor Auchi actually had presence. It was incredible. I got like 3 game overs: A combination of jumping the gun while not having the right evidence at the right time, and one piece of evidence I had the complete wrong idea about. I'd like to detail that piece in particular below.

One of the very first pieces of evidence you get is the photo of the half-eaten steak. Your initial need is to prove that there was a second person at the table the victim sat with. I happened to notice that the steak not only had bites taken out of it by a victim who would not have been able to eat at the time, but also had a knife that had clearly cut into the steak while no juice or residue had gotten onto the fork. Clearly, I surmised, the steak was bought for someone else. Furthermore, the person for whom it was intended must have gotten rid of it for some reason. This, readers, is incorrect.

But I couldn't shake that knife out of my head, it had to have something to do with the case! "Ah, I'm getting ahead of myself, this is clearly how we're going to nail the killer! The steak must have been poisoned!" I thought. I kept whipping that out at times where it seemed to fit just right and kept being baffled when it didn't. I went so far as to say that the bottle had no poison in it. At last we get to the moment of truth - the killer's nationality and their penchant for tableware. "AT LAST! NOW'S THE TIME!!" and I felt so smart when at last the piece came to light. But then the started talking about... about bite marks. That had gone completely under my radar, so focused I was I hadn't even noticed! "W-Whuh...?" I went. I was utterly dumbfounded. Thunderstruck! Gobsmacked!! THE ENTIRE POINT WAS A RED HERRING!

Then I played the second case. And I realized this game was made for me.

The second case was much easier. Like most investigative phases you really are just ballroom dancing on the train as you chug along the railroad. The closed fist was the only aspect that truly stumped me. The two other points I stumbled on were later revealed to be the things I thought they were. Meeting Holmes was a hell of an experience. I'm not familiar with any of the novels or short stories, but I did know enough to be able to say "Lay off the powdered sugar, Holmes." I'm somewhat proud I was able to figure out within 5 minutes of meeting him that he was just taking the piss out of Ryunosuke. There's a very subtle clue in his dialogue. Where the first case had left me honestly grasping, the deductive moments with Holmes left me with incredulity. I couldn't believe what I was reading, I can't believe anybody could miss the point that hard. One line of dialogue rendered me literally speechless. I was IRL ellipses-sing with the rest of the cast. I am so glad I am playing this personally.
 

fanboymaster

(He/Him)
As a longtime Sherlock Holmes fan, the version presented in GAA is one of my personal favorites and his sheer capacity to be obnoxious and weird and taken with anything that will keep him interested in a case feels like a very fitting interpretation of him.
 

Mogri

Round and round I go
(he)
Staff member
Moderator
I particularly like Sad Sholmes - I think from the final case in GAA1?
 

Isrieri

My father told me this would happen
I finished the first game last night and I was a little disappointed. This is not in regard to the story, which I thought worked quite well, but that the story was favored a little more than the gameplay since there was a part I got stuck on for a good while due to literally missing a piece of the puzzle. However this is the only real mark against what is otherwise a solid bunch of cases: The previous two were so much fun and filled with intrigue. It just seems strange that the final chapter of the first game was less of a climax and satisfying wrap-up than it was an interquel that bridges the first half (TGAA1) with the second half of the complete story (TGAA2). Strange decision but it did its job of making me want to immediately dive into the next game.

I am expecting great things of Act 2 in Naruhodo's adventures. Also as much as I love Sherlock, Inspector Gregson is just the kind of underdog character I love to root for. Here's to getting him a happy ending and to uncover the <spoilers>!
 

Dark Medusa

Diamond Crusader
(He/they)
The second game benefits strongly from actually wrapping up plot points; it was a weird choice to have the final case of the first game act more like a case 3 or 4 from the original trilogy, and it ends up making the first game feel anticlimactic to me. But yes, the second game is a ridiculously tense, climactic, and polished experience, excited for you to experience it!

Spoiler for the ending of game two haha holy shit happy ending for the Inspector huh yeah right
 

Isrieri

My father told me this would happen
WHAAAAAAAAAT?!?!

I'm up to Case 2-4 and have uncovered the spoilers. First one I kinda saw coming. Second one, see above.
 

Isrieri

My father told me this would happen
Game complete! That was a great Ace Attorney! I think the aforementioned comments regarding Chronicles as best in the series are much warranted. For me, they are definitely both at the top, now.

I can't talk about the game much because of the spoilers so I'll just make the following points:
  • I was truly, truly impressed by the writing & localization. It might be the best localization I've ever experienced. It feels very period-appropriate whist being immaculately witty whilst swinging back and forth from over-the-top comedy to grounded drama without missing a beat. Similarly, the music & animation were top tier in regard to how both were utilized across the game. The greatest moments of tension & laughter all came about via these things working together in harmony, and this game pulls it off consistently across all the cases.
  • Kazuma & Susato's theme in particular were the veritable standouts.
  • This is a marathon gauntlet of a game. If you play it, I recommend taking many breaks. No matter how badly you want to keep going.
  • All the characters are vivacious and wonderful. Sherlock is hilarious. Ryunosuke is plucky & admirable, Susato is clearly the best character, and Gregson is still my favorite. All four of them however, are mere shadows cast by the gleaming moonbeams spilling from one Souseki Natsume. I wonder how many poses they made for his model.
  • There were a few moments where I felt no shame in using the Story Mode feature to pick out the things that totally went under my nose. I recall using it about 4 times in total. Very happy that the feature is there to avoid having to go by process of elimination when I was genuinely stumped. One of the things I was explaining to a friend, when asked about why there are game overs at all, is that your penalty for screwing up is not lost progress, it's feeling like a damn idiot. No shame in admitting when you're outright stumped I think, rather than bashing your head against a puzzle.
  • There were a few posers I wasn't happy with because I always felt alternate explanations were possible or warranted, and a great many that I couldn't see because of my own presuppositions. The latter happened pretty often, which is why Holmes' dance of deduction sequences are so delightfully fun even when they are by a wide margin the easiest parts of the game. Holmes' jocund ribbing never failed to make me smile.
  • I liked the jury system because you could have fun with more characters than just the witnesses and it forces you to change up your logical reasoning a little. You're not solely hunting for contradictions but also searching for correlations. In that respect they could probably have gone a little further but what we have is perfectly fine.
  • I kept thinking about the period that this game is set in around the turn of the century in 1900s London and I couldn't get the thought out of my head - the 1950s would be but a scant 50 years later and the revolutions in technology and cultural attitudes would leave this era unrecognizable. It struck me how incredibly recent all the 20th century's developments are. Then I thought about myself being born at the turn of the 21st century and something about it all gave me an odd sense of longing.
 

Mogri

Round and round I go
(he)
Staff member
Moderator
The deduction sequences are easy as you mention, but the dialogue you get for screwing up is among the most delightful in the game. Highly recommend failing.
 
All four of them however, are mere shadows cast by the gleaming moonbeams spilling from one Souseki Natsume
GOATED
I kept thinking about the period that this game is set in around the turn of the century in 1900s London and I couldn't get the thought out of my head - the 1950s would be but a scant 50 years later and the revolutions in technology and cultural attitudes would leave this era unrecognizable. It struck me how incredibly recent all the 20th century's developments are. Then I thought about myself being born at the turn of the 21st century and something about it all gave me an odd sense of longing.
Isn't history enthralling?
 

Kalir

Do you require aid.
(whatevs)
If they make new Ace Attorney games, the jury system is 100% something I'd like to see return in later games.
 

shivam

commander damage
(he/hiim)
god, i hated souseki so much that i almost quit during his cases. he just never stopped moving and was so utterly annoying, lol
 

Rascally Badger

El Capitan de la outro espacio
(He/Him)
I just finished Case 4 of the first GAA game. I am not enjoying this nearly as much as any of the previous games in the series. I think partly is the multiple people giving testimony at once, which seems to make each of the characters less distinct. Also, that there seems to be one investigation phase and one trial phase, rather than alternating sections where you learn more about the case in the trial and then investigate things to get a fuller picture going into the next day.
 

Dark Medusa

Diamond Crusader
(He/they)
I do feel like the second game just straight up is better than the first, and might not address that specific concern, but it comes together well.
 

Rascally Badger

El Capitan de la outro espacio
(He/Him)
Okay, I finally finished the last case of GAA 1. I really didn't like that I had my last meaningful interaction a full hour and half before the game ended. You win the case without solving the case, and most the explanation comes afterward. Maybe I'm misremembering older Ace Attorney games, but I feel like you go into the trials with one or two pieces of solid information, and those form the bedrock of unraveling everything until you show what really happened and by the time you've convinced the fact finder of what really happened, you have figured it all out yourself. Here, you show that it must have been the culprit, but you haven't really unraveled any of the other parts, so they have to explain it. And reading a bald explanation of everything is not that interesting.
 
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