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America's Favorite Non-prehistoric Cartoon Family - The Simpsons Thread

Tegan

dirtbag lesbian
(She/Her)
We watched this episode in my art history class and my instructor tried real hard to make a case for Jasper Johns stealing lightbulbs being a metaphor for his work repurposing ideas from the cultural hivemind and like... Nah dude.
 

Johnny Unusual

(He/Him)
We watched this episode in my art history class and my instructor tried real hard to make a case for Jasper Johns stealing lightbulbs being a metaphor for his work repurposing ideas from the cultural hivemind and like... Nah dude.
Look, metaphors can be unintended and a lot of my reviews contain observations that I'm positive in no way informed by authorial intent but rather what happens outside of it. Two critics can have completely counter views and the nature of criticism is that they can both be "correct" interpretations.

But, no, he's fucking wrong.
 

Johnny Unusual

(He/Him)
The Old Man and the 'C' Student

Looking at my parents is a bit weird, as my father, who has MS, is living a very different life than my able bodied mother. Dad feels much more as someone who needs a lot of stability and routine and is pretty happy about it for the most part. And sometimes, he's happy to deviate but it can be a problem. There are foods he can't eat that he used to be happy to because his system is a lot more sensitive now and with his mobility and pain issues, they are things that are a lot harder to roll with. But we are also looking for ways to give him more fun and adventure and variety, which he also does enjoy. But finding that balancing between comfort/safety and something adventurous often includes a bit of a learning curve.

In this episode, Springfield ends up losing the Olympics after Bart's comedy routine offends the Olympic selection committee. As a punishment, all the students are given community service and Bart is given work at the Springfield Retirement Castle. Bart immediately hates the work but also gains a lot of sympathy for the seniors, as they live what he sees as a flavourless life of routine. Lisa, meanwhile, works to maintain this, trying to bring joy and comfort to the routine. Eventually, Bart gets fed up and encourages them all to escape. The seniors have a fun afternoon that Bart ends with a boat cruise. Lisa catches up with Bart and is impressed that the old folks seem to be doing fine. But the seniors want to return, and Bart learns that they enjoy their comfortable routine. The cruise boat nearly sinks but Grandpa gives Bart thanks for helping out and giving them some adventure.

The Old Man and the C Student is a B-/C+ grade episode with some B grade humour. Which isn't bad, seeing as I don't think too many of the gags are resting on Homer "What are ya gonna do" lazy lines. But the Hellfish episode is a much stronger Bart/Grandpa ep and I would recommend that one first. Still, there's a lot to like in this one. I think it is an episode that does keep in mind the theming, even if the climax is merely serviceable and the final moments don't quite work as a proper resolution. The last scene implies its a Bart/Grandpa but really its a Bart and Senior ensemble. The seniors don't get to have much in the way of character beyond broad gags, at least as much as Bart and Lisa do.

The Simpsons approach to its senior characters is... interesting. There are moments of de-humanization but also the show tends to be extremely pointed in its satire of how we as a whole society de-humanize the elderly. There's so much Simpsons satire that doesn't age as well. Not even "problematic stuff" but also stuff where a cultural point of view has shifted in a way where it doesn't work. The old folks home is down the middle with some ableist humour but at the same time the sadness from these characters is made to be palpable when they are betrayed. It can be a bummer but it is supposed to be and hopefully makes people think about the old people in their lives.

And in this episode, I feel like it does a decent job with Bart and Lisa, very much based in character, being good but having very different ways to give these people happy lives. Troublemaker and disruptor Bart thinks the old folks need to get out of what he sees as a life trapped in routine and banality. Lisa wants to give them the comfort that they are happy with. And while "both sides are right/wrong" often looks wrong in retrospect in a LOT of arguments but I do think it works here. Both characters have good intent but Bart learns that there are different ways to carpe diem and Lisa sees a little adventure can be good. Its not the most insightful lesson and it feels like there could be a stronger episode with the premise but as is, its perfectly fine and there are some good lines in this one.

Jokes I missed before:

Homer prying open a box with a picture of Grandpa, then throwing it away.

Other great jokes:

"Economists predict that Springfield will experience the same boom Sarajevo enjoyed following the 1984 games." *
Oof.




"Those aren't the dogs eyes, are they?"

Its weird that the optics look like Marge just happened to have a beer that she was going to drink for herself before Homer took it. Marge isn't really the public daydrinking type.

"Hey, Chalmers, where are you from?"
"Oh, well I was born in Queens, went to Ball State and then made the move to Intercourse, Pennsylvania, why do you ask?"

"Intercourse?"

"Now if you excuse me, I'm off to my vacation to Lake Titicaca. Let's see you make a joke out of that smart guy!"





"Yarr, not a looker among them."

"How did you not see that huge boat."
"Yarr, two glass eyes."
...wait.

"I want some taquitos"

Other notes:

* I feel like there could be a great episode where the Olympics DO come to Springfield. The show actually has done Olympic episodes before but I don't think any contended with the fact that Olympics ruins local economies and leaves a scar. This could be a great, dark episode.

While it isn't top tier or anything, I feel like the Jack Lalane cameo feels like what a celebrity cameo should be: seems like they are awesome and are going to be a hero, then it turns out they are something of a coward or fail spectacularly. Like that time where they sidelined all the baseball players.
 

Octopus Prime

Mysterious Contraption
(He/Him)
“Two glass eyes” is one of my favourite Sea Captain lines, up there with “I hate the sea, and everything in it” and “Ah Squiddy, I got nothin against ye”
 

Büge

Arm Candy
(she/her)
It only occurred to me much later that the "Vincent Price's Egg Magic" joke from Sunday, Cruddy Sunday made sense because

Vincent Price portrayed the villain Egghead on the 1960s Batman show.

 

Johnny Unusual

(He/Him)
Monty Can't Buy Me Love

Wealth can buy a lot. It can even buy a narrative. But the fact is, unless properly tended and maintained, it can only last so long. I feel like there's been a long succession of "hero billionaires", businessmen who show themselves as much more altruistic than their counterparts. I'm sure many believe their own hype and I watched talk shows where hosts I liked and respected (and mostly still do) acted awed and impressed by their intent and accomplishments. Elon Musk was the big one but now I don't see anyone beyond the unmovable fanatics who want to touch the guy. And any public appearance makes Musk even MORE villainous, even when we think we've hit the lowest point. Well, he's not going to stop trying and is going to appear on SNL this Saturday. But the fact is, the damage is done and Musk is probably beyond PR rehabilitation. And thank God, because he clearly is someone who isn't interested in changing and probably doesn't think so. Self-delusion is a hell of a drug and money is a Hell of a fuel.

In this episode, Burns takes note of the popularity of billionaire charismatic billionaire Arthur Fortune and realizes he lacks public affection in his life. Burns decides to warm up to the common man, he'll need his input and gets help from Homer Simpson. But with every attempt, Burns can't win the public's love. As a desperate effort, Burns decides to catch the Loch Ness Monster and succeeds but during the press conference accidentally runs amok and becomes even less popular. Homer suggests Burns not even bother and Burns accepts it.

I remember a few TT folks mentioning this as a noted "bad" one and I didn't remember it that way. And rewatching it... its reputation is a bit much, but it isn't that great. Its another one where the potential is there but the final product is just a little lukewarm. Its a John Swartzwelder script and while he remains a great joke man, the more loosy-goosy tone of the later seasons means the great jokes aren't anchored to a great story and that's a shame. I think the problem is where the focus should be. The episode is about Burns wanting to find love and there's is a great, classic thematic hook: in hunting a monster, Burns becomes far more monstrous, flooding a town and setting fire to a dock. But I feel like while this seemed clever and fun in the planning stages, the mechanics of making it all work feel a little creaky. After all, the biggest evil is Burns destroying a town but somehow the capper of the episode is Burns accidentally burning a dock. It feels like the rules of escalation should end in town destruction or at least when he returns to Springfield, he looses love in a more intimate act of evil, like betraying someone.

I will say that Nessie being real doesn't bother me. A real monster is a bit of a step over the conventional reality of the Simpsons world. Like, I feel the rule is impossible shit can TOTALLY happen if its for a joke and not for the main plot, so this is a bit odd. But my problem isn't this instead of a lack of insight. I think on paper there's something in exploring the kind of evil Burns is... almost effortlessly, meaning that even when pursuing something that isn't evil, like love, he will do it in an evil way. The best example is Lisa saying "When you try to be good, you're even more evil.:" And I think that's something that can be great to explore, especially in relation to public fascination with flashy "altruistic" billionaires. But frustratingly, it has nothing much to say towards Burns as a character or Richard Branson-like trendsetters.

I think a lot of the pieces are there but I feel like some of the plans faded into the background, either in the writer's room (I think it was Dana Gould who said if you are precious about your script, don't bring it to the Simpsons because that's not how the process on that show works) or when it went from outline to finished product. It doesn't even feel messy or disjointed, a feeling I have with a LOT of later episodes. It just feels sort of blandly meaningless with some solid gags. And look, I know generally as a critic you are supposed to review what you saw rather than suggest "should haves" but its so easy to see paths to stronger episodes. Burns is a great character and I like the idea of him being love starved, learning the wrong lessons and perverting the nature of love based on his atrocious worldview but this is an episode where the journey is "I need love/No I don't" and in between we are getting a disappointing lack of understanding of how this guy works.

Jokes I missed before:


Other great jokes:

"Fine, if we're not going to do anything, we'll just talk about our day. I wrote another poem about a duck.:"
I love that she wrote it on a piece of paper shaped like a duck.

"Oh, look, there's the place where I buy my yarn. But you don't want to buy your buttons there."
"Phew, well I dodged a bullet.:"
"Now THERE'S the place you want to buy your buttons."

"Oh, looks like something exciting his happening. We'll have to read about it in tomorrow's paper."

"I'm sorry. I am really sorry. Oh, ach, I don't know what I was thinking. But Field of Dreams was good, wasn't it? Made us all believe again?"

"Once again my underwear has become tangled in a cow catcher."

"Books and cocoa in the same store. What's next, a talking banana?"
"Uh, I don't see one, sir."
"O, of course, the very idea of a talking banana is absurd. But still..."

Cricket poison is a good bit.



"This isn't the monsterometer. Its the frog exaggerator."

"That was amazing Mr. Burns."
"I was a little worried when he swallowed me but, well, you know the rest."
I like how the expression on their faces say that they don't and somehow, despite being there, they are in the same position the audience is.

I don't think the climax quite works but the monster's friendly face goes a long way to selling it.

Other notes:

The Jerry Rude bit isn't very good. Its pretty generic shock jock parodying. The original plan was originally to get Howard Stern. Instead, Jerry Rude is played by the always great Michael McKean. He does good work but a shame he doesn't get a lot to say that's particularly funny.

There's not much of a reason of Smithers to just... disappear from the episode.

"Does the opening scene mirror the themes of the episode" watch 2021:

The episode begins with the Simpsons being lazy as fuck. In the end, Homer notes that being a good person takes hard work, while being a shit means not bothering. The takeaway is Burns realizing that he doesn't NEED anyone's approval but that barely works in the story we've seen. Its more interesting as a tale of a man who thinks he will be entitled love by grand gestures and just doesn't and will never get what it takes.
 

jpfriction

A most radical pontiff
I’m one of the folks saying this was a particularly bad one (it’s the first one I remember watching and thinking I must be missing something because this just feel off).

Two things stand out in my memory:

Repeating Lisa saying “I heard this really sucks” after the end credits. Hard agree, Lisa.

That little back and forth between Homer and Nessie about how bad the shrimp puffs were or whatever. Felt ad-libbed, but not in a good way.
 

Johnny Unusual

(He/Him)
They Saved Lisa's Brain

I've known good people have bad takes when they are young. I know I did. I knew someone who felt that cons should be legal since it is the victims fault for falling for it. This person certainly doesn't feel that way now but I feel like there's is a specific arrogance to youth. It can be a good things at time, a rebellious spirit in the face of a stupid status quo upheld by pointless tradition. But it also means that you might cling to some stupid philosophy that doesn't take into account human empathy or realistic expectations. Some people never grow out of this phase, sadly, but I have seen bad takes and surely have had bad takes (that I probably blocked out) about how things SHOULD be, assuming a stupid kind of justice. It doesn't mean that the people who thinks these ways aren't intelligence but they aren't being wise.

In this episode, Springfield has a riot at a gross-out contest that tests her faith in the people of Springfield. She writes a think piece encouraging self-improvement. She gains the attention of the Springfield branch of MENSA, who invite her to join. Lisa enjoys time with her new friends but they all find themselves frustrated by being pushed around by the bullying dullards of Springfield. Deciding to take a stand on a minor issue, Mayor Quimby assumes he's been caught in another scandal and skips town, leaving the mayoral seat vacant. According to the old town charter, a council of learned men are to be put in charge and since MENSA Springfield fit the bill, they do. At first, their clever ideas and innovations do wonders for the town but soon infighting begins to tear the team apart, culminating in a public event where individual members unilaterally start creating unrealistic and unfair new rules. Stephen Hawking arrives to shame them and Lisa learns that everyone has a different idea of what a better world entails.

This was an episode I was kind of dreading since the two things I remember most from the episode are a transphobic slur being used as a big punchline and Stephen Hawking. Now, I like Stephen Hawking, but its been a long time so while I remembered broad details, I couldn't quite remember how ableist the humour might be in the guise of "hey, we are all having fun here." The latter actually isn't that bad. Its still there and though Homer is the real but of the joke confusing him with probably the only celebrity in a wheelchair he knows and calling him a "robot". Frankly, I think the show mostly does right more than wrong with Hawking and he comes off as a cool dude (and would continue in about a year or so later on Futurama). The transphobic joke, though... woof.

As a whole... I had mixed feelings on this one. It had a fair number of legit good jokes but I also think that its faults are a little similar to the characters. I get simplification for the sake of comedy but it essentially splits the world into "smart people" and "the unwashed masses". The episode is definitely aware of this as a shitty way of looking at things with some low key lines showing some assumed superiority by MENSA Springfield but it also feels like even though they are proven to be childish... they are kind of right, by the logic of the episode? It more comes across as "everyone sucks" rather than "intelligence does not equal being correct". This shouldn't be too surprising, as the empathy towards the characters seems to be on the wane by season 10. Springfield's mob mentality has always painted it ugly but somehow here it doesn't work for me when it reads as intellectual classist.

Though this aspect kind of cuts the main message wrong, its not a bad message. Intelligence doesn't equal wisdom and Lisa does have wisdom but lacks enough to differentiate the two. And she's 8, so its hard to blame her. I do think its a shame because it is also a theme that could easily work in a more emotional context, with Lisa realizing having a condescending attitude towards the people she wants to help is a step in the wrong direction but as I said, the point of view of the episode isn't much different, save that smart people are equally unwise at times. Its easy to see this when actual smart people have bad, stupid takes on politics or perhaps fields that they aren't in fact experts in. But this interesting idea results in an episode that's often quite funny but rubs me the wrong way with the way it presents.

Jokes I missed before:
"We hold you sub-omeguloids in the highest regard."

Other great jokes:

"Ethnic Mismatch Comedy #644 has been cancelled. In its place is an encore presentation of Princess Di's funeral."
Think how recent that event was at the time the episode aired.

"The low fat pudding that's approved for sale... BY THE GOVERNMENT!"

"Our most disgusting contestant will win a free trip to Hartford, Connecticut."
"I thought it was Hawaii."
"No one said Hawaii."

The dictionary joke has been done like five times already but I still kind of like it.

"Well, I'm sure someone had the time to read it."
"I envy them."

I also has how the Book Burning Mobile has an already raging fire in it. For burning books.

"Even the microfilm?"
"Even the microfiche."

"Only one person in a million would find that funny."
"Yes, we call that the Dennis Miller ratio."
The joke didn't age funnier but it aged more correct.


"Well, excuse this jaded reporter if he says he's heard that before."
"Well, we really mean it."
"*gasp* you do?!?"



"Wow, I'm making great time! If only I has somewhere to be..."


"Larry Flint is right."
This... this still makes me laugh.

"Let's make litter out of these literati."
"That's to clever, you're one of them!"

"Even the smartest of us can be the most childish."
"Even you?"
"No. Not me. Never."

Other notes:
Blond Lindsay Nagel is here. She is complete. Now... when will they decide on Judge Snyder's skin?

Lisa's rescue at the end makes her look dumb as fuck, just standing around with a CLEAR exit while people destroy the gazebo.

"Does the opening scene mirror the themes of the episode" watch 2021:

More demonstrative of the first plot point which sets up the themes.
 

Tegan

dirtbag lesbian
(She/Her)
"Let's make litter outta these literati" remains brilliant, but yeesh the transphobia in this one. I hesitate to even call it a joke, because there's no punchline to it, it's just "let's repeatedly drop a pretty strong slur for no reason."
 

Octopus Prime

Mysterious Contraption
(He/Him)
I always confused this one with Lisa the Simpson.

I also forgot about the surprise transphobia when it came up on my rewatch. Really hits ya extra hard when you aren’t braced for it
 

Johnny Unusual

(He/Him)
30 Minutes Over Tokyo

I've lived in Japan twice in my life. One was for a mere month when I was 8 years old. I mostly remember walks and ice cream night and some of the traditional Japanese toys we brought home. The next time was when I was 25 and I was teaching English. I was a bit lonely but my experiences were mostly positive. Being an anime nerd, I spent a lot of time in arcades or hanging around a used game/manga store. I do feel like I missed out on some opportunities being such a homebody but I did do things that were a lot of fun and interesting. I don't have much to say beyond that except if you are in Hokkaido, eat the fuck out of some Soup Curry. That shit is delicious.

In this episode, the Simpsons are having a financial crisis and end up getting tips from a "mega-savings" seminar. They extend this to their family vacation, which results in a cheap impromptu vacation to Tokyo. The family ends up exploring the country but after Homer ends up attacking the Emperor, the family ends up losing most of their funds. With no money and few ways to make ends meet, the family hedges their bets on a game show that promises to grant their hearts desire. The game show proves to be cruel but the Simpsons manage to win and return home.

30 Minutes Over Tokyo is an episode I was kind of dreading and my takeaway is... its not as problematic as I was fearing, but it runs with old standbys I found HILARIOUS at the time and now find hacky and kind of offensive today. JAPAN IS WEIRD AND EVEN WEIRDER IS THEIR TAKES ON THE WEST. I feel like its a take that doesn't hold as much water considering pretty much every example can be countered with the West being weird. Yes, Japan has some weird game shows but I've definitely seen weird game shows and in particular reality shows in the West. Remember THE SWAN. A show that outdid parody and was a look into the ugliness of the human soul.

I will say while it doesn't defend parts where it is weirding out about the "other", it actually did bother to have a lot of actors of Asian descent this episode, which is something I feel they would not do often. There is George Takei as the evil game show host but a lot of the other actors fill in for some of the smaller roles in the episode. Considering the current actions being taken for characters having voice actors actually representative of their race, I appreciate this small favor, even if its to somewhat questionable ends.

The episode itself isn't superclear what its about. I do think there is something in there but it really isn't about Japan but rather the nature of trying to get by with very little cash. Living frugally is hard and an episode about the Simpsons trying to do so is a potentially interesting one. After all, with current discussions about the minimum wage, it feels like a better time than ever to discuss what it actually means to survive on very little money. The Simpsons used to be a show about that but the storytelling inconvenience is why it was largely jettisoned but really, I think its OK to explore this a bit. The game show is also further taking advantage of the poor in order to humiliate them in exchange for cash. Unfortunately, like a lot of later episodes, I don't feel like it comes to a proper conclusion to its point. It has a climax but I feel like it doesn't say anything interesting about the pain of living frugally other than it sucks if you have to do it and the Japan element that the episode is hung on doesn't connect to it well beyond "vacationing is expensive".

Jokes I missed before:

Other great jokes:

I like how Homer immediately defaults to "Sorry sir" the second Ned catches him in the most avuncular way possible.

"See this tux? I got it cheap because Roy Cohn died in it."

"You fat cats didn't finish your plankton. Now its mine!"

"You liked Rashomon!"
"That's not how I remember it."
Smartest joke in the episode.



"Toga! Toga! Toga! 2000!"
"Marge! They stole my idea."

"In jail, we had to be in this dumb kabuki play about the 47 Ronin and I wanted to be Oshii but they made me Orii."

"Does the opening scene mirror the themes of the episode" watch 2021:

Not at all. Maybe someone else can find a connection but not I.

Other notes:
Chuck Garabedian just looks like Jason Bateman.


I also appreciate how his spiel feels very prefect to the clickbait age. I'm assuming the things he is a parody of probably was a big influence on clickbait. The kind of clickbait those Wall Street fat cats DON'T WANT YOU TO KNOW!

Great, another transphobic joke. Sigh. These are going to start coming more frequently, aren't they?
 

Tegan

dirtbag lesbian
(She/Her)
Chuck Garabedian just looks like Jason Bateman.
In fairness, Jason Bateman looks like a video game protagonist with every slider set to the exact middle. He is the white man who all other white men somewhat resemble.

And yeah, two really awful transphobic jokes in a row; the show gets pretty impossible to like at this point, for me. This is also right around the time Futurama was winding up and that show very quickly became immensely shitty to queer people.
 

gogglebob

The Goggles Do Nothing
(he/him)
JAPAN IS WEIRD AND EVEN WEIRDER IS THEIR TAKES ON THE WEST

I feel like there is the universal need to "joke" about other cultures getting your own culture wrong that is generally very funny in the micro of a moment, but terrible under any kind of scrutiny. This episode is the kind of episode that highlights why this kind of humor should be retired (or at least not extended to practically a full half hour).

Anecdote from my own life: my wife is from Poland, and her sister still lives there. We went to visit Poland in the Before Times, and my sister-in-law's partner was bragging about this great "American Pizza Place" that we had to try, because we could properly judge it as Americans. Its name? Colorado Pizza.

Now, I'm from New Jersey, and I'm pretty confident about my place in the pizza wars. Additionally, I've asked around, and, fun fact, nobody thinks Colorado is the place for pizza. It's not even in the top ten. But this restaurant had all sorts of cowboy imagery on display, "American" foods like buffalo wings, and was super stoked about the whole "Authentic Colorado Experience" (in English on the menu!) for pizza. My wife and I spent nearly the whole meal mocking the idea of authentic Colorado pizza to our Polish hosts.

But, my sister-in-law's partner ate there a lot, and knew the owner. And he was a younger dude, and we were told he was a good sport about things, so the owner was called over, and we asked him "Why Colorado?" And he said that it wasn't too complicated, he had some family in Colorado, he had visited them once or twice, and they sent over some of the random "American" knickknacks that were around the store. He knew damn well that Colorado wasn't the pizza capital of the USA, but it was familiar, and he figured nobody in Poland was going to check CO's credentials. It was just kind of a fun thing, vaguely intended to be "funny" from the beginning. If there was a joke here, he was in on it.

And that's what I always think of on this topic. Like, we immediately assume people are seeing "our" culture as some whacky, foreign "other", but a lot of the time, they know exactly what they're doing. "They" are a lot more familiar than anyone wants to admit, and making the whole joke that they are out of touch with a culture is actually the complete reverse of the reality.
 

Lokii

It's always time for burgers
(He/Him)
Staff member
Moderator
Can concur. I'm from Colorado and we def have Colorado pizza around and here, and yes the restaurants are full of authentic Colorado crap.
 

MetManMas

Me and My Bestie
(He, him)
That joke referencing the huge seizure incident the Pokémon anime caused is not funny.

I really feel like The Simpsons lost a lot when they cut back on the emotional core and reality stuff in favor of more and more wacky stacking. The family's financial difficulties in another country are secondary (or worse) compared to "Hey look how crazy our baka gaijin writers' take on Japan is" as far the ep goes.

Not to say there wasn't some real wacky stuff before this (Last season did have the entire town relocated 'cuz Homer flooded it with trash as garbage commissioner), but I mean, this season has seen stuff like an out of nowhere reveal that Ned Flanders is a senior citizen being used as a vehicle to get Homer and Ned to have wacky misadventures in Las Vegas with a non-ending stranded in the desert with buzzards, and Homer flooding the entire frickin' town for an art project with no consequences.

The balance between reality and wackiness has been going more over to the wacky side, and it's not too hard to see how we went from this to stuff like "Bart is a fortune teller this week".
 

Zef

Find Your Reason
(He/Him)
And that's what I always think of on this topic. Like, we immediately assume people are seeing "our" culture as some whacky, foreign "other", but a lot of the time, they know exactly what they're doing. "They" are a lot more familiar than anyone wants to admit, and making the whole joke that they are out of touch with a culture is actually the complete reverse of the reality.

By "our" do you mean the tourist's, or specifically American? Because if the former, well, it's like the Guac chat we had the other day. If there's a hundred shops or restaurants that knowingly and deliberately make light of "culture X" to draw in their clientele, well, said clientele is likely not going to know any better, and "culture X" itself is supplanted by its own parody.
 

gogglebob

The Goggles Do Nothing
(he/him)
Using "our" to predominantly mean Americans here, as that was definitely the point of referenced Simpsons episode.
 

Büge

Arm Candy
(she/her)
Anecdote from my own life: my wife is from Poland, and her sister still lives there. We went to visit Poland in the Before Times, and my sister-in-law's partner was bragging about this great "American Pizza Place" that we had to try, because we could properly judge it as Americans. Its name? Colorado Pizza.
Here in Canada, we have a restaurant chain named Boston Pizza.

Kylie assures me that Boston doesn't have a pizza style of its own, nor does the Boston Pizza menu seem to bear out any uniqueness on the part of its pizza preparation.
 

jpfriction

A most radical pontiff
Boston pizza is always fun to me because we don’t have a ton of national bar/restaurant chains left down here that are pizza focused so our closest analog is probably Old Chicago. Nice little rivalry there. (I’ve never actually eaten chicago style pizza at old chicago).
 

Tegan

dirtbag lesbian
(She/Her)
We also have New York Fries and Swiss Chalet. No idea why all our restaurants are named after other places.
 

muteKi

Women want fish fear meme
I don't know about Boston pizza, but the best pizza I think I've ever had was Uncle Tony's in East Providence -- and it was (more-or-less) Sicilian-style.
 
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