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  #1  
Old 02-06-2015, 08:07 AM
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Default Greenies: Talk about Vegetables

Working in a grocery store, I run into some obscure produce like Leeks, Mint, various kinds of squash, etc.

List some of your favorite greens and how you use them in dishes.

I find I like Spinich for salad. Much tastier than iceberg lettuce.
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Old 02-06-2015, 08:24 AM
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I love kale. All varieties of it. I make a pretty killer kale Caesar.

We've pretty much always got some spinach on hand for whatever we want. Sautťed and thrown in with pasta, salads, spinach & chickpea "ricotta" stuffed shells, the list goes on.

Arugula is a favourite too, though I don't use it as often as I'd like. Great for salads, pesto, sandwiches, whatever you want.

There are still some veggies I have yet to use, but that will change.
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Old 02-06-2015, 10:10 AM
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I love a good Romaine that's got a deep green and therefore stronger flavor.
Damned Foxy has been producing a paler variety.
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Old 02-06-2015, 01:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beefy Hits View Post
Working in a grocery store, I run into some obscure produce like Leeks, Mint, various kinds of squash, etc.

List some of your favorite greens and how you use them in dishes.

I find I like Spinich for salad. Much tastier than iceberg lettuce.
if that's obscure to you, I am surprised

All snark aside, we have a great fresh produce store or two here in Baton Rouge, and we grow mint in our garden along with a bunch of other herbs. Perfect for our leek and potato soup!
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Old 02-06-2015, 01:28 PM
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Rutabagas are really yummy mashed with butter, salt, and pepper!

They're really good for you, too!

Also, fresh dill makes anything better. ANYTHING.
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Old 02-06-2015, 01:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beefy Hits View Post
Working in a grocery store, I run into some obscure produce like Leeks, Mint, various kinds of squash, etc.

List some of your favorite greens and how you use them in dishes.

I find I like Spinich for salad. Much tastier than iceberg lettuce.
Kale is one of the "it" greens these days, so I'm kind of surprised you find it obscure. It replaces and supplements other greens in salads, works well sauteed with something acidic (vinegar, lemon, etc.) or can even be baked into a chip-like crispness.

Leeks are like green onions / scallions but bigger, sandier, and more flavorful.

As UUDD said, mint is hardly obscure. It provides mint flavoring to lots of things. Pure mint leaves are generally used for garnishes rather than cooking in things. Or sometimes slightly ground or smashed to release the flavor and put in liquids.

Some squashes are good just roasted whole and cut open. Some are better if cut before roasting, scooping out seeds/guts and adding butter, salt pepper, and cinnamon. And others still work well cut then sauteed.
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Old 02-06-2015, 02:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Droewyn View Post
Also, fresh dill makes anything better. ANYTHING.
Mmmmm, lemon dill roasted potatoes.
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  #8  
Old 02-06-2015, 07:29 PM
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I say they're obscure because few people I run into buy them. Most people buy cucumbers, zukini, celery, and cilantro, and roma tomatoes, and vine tomatoes.

Damn, if you prepare brussel sprouts right they are delicious. Great texture.

They have a bad rep.
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Old 02-06-2015, 11:25 PM
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brussels sprouts are amazing. I roast them with garlic and stuff (lemon? red wine vinegar?) and they're so good~ Once I threw in some broccoli with them for the hell of it. It worked! They're cousins.

I've also been roasting lots of cauliflower lately. Mainly with cardamom, cumin, coriander, fenugreek... yum.

I've been meaning to try Green Cauliflower/Broccoflower too. It looks more... pointy and geometrical than cauliflower. Anyone know what it tastes like?
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Old 02-07-2015, 08:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pointzeroeight View Post
We've pretty much always got some spinach on hand for whatever we want. Sautťed and thrown in with pasta, salads, spinach & chickpea "ricotta" stuffed shells, the list goes on.
It's always good to have a big bag of frozen spinach on hand. This past week I made sautťed spinach on naan bread, which was great, and then later I improved a frozen pizza by smearing sautťed spinach all over it, sprinkling some shredded provolone over that, and broiling it.
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Old 02-07-2015, 08:25 AM
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Spinach has become on of my staples. That stuff goes in almost anything. You can even put it in fruit smoothies if you're just trying to get some vegetables in you.
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  #12  
Old 02-07-2015, 09:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Solitayre View Post
Spinach has become on of my staples. That stuff goes in almost anything. You can even put it in fruit smoothies if you're just trying to get some vegetables in you.

You can do the same with kale! Just had a slightly stronger flavor that most will want to add something more to counter.
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  #13  
Old 02-07-2015, 08:10 PM
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Veggies are pretty great! I feel bad for people who don't appreciate them. I don't think I really did until I tried to go vegetarian for a month. Although I'm not a vegetarian now, I don't eat meat as often as I used to, and now I know veggies are rad as hell. I don't even need deli meat for my sandwiches because tomatoes, spinach, and a dab or two of honey mustard taste great all on their own. (And if you're lucky enough to have access to avocados that are at just the right stage of freshness, well...!)

Did you know you can just chop up a sweet potato with maybe a tablespoon of oil and bake it to make something that's way cheaper, tastier, and a lot better than you than a bag of frozen sweet potato fries? I didn't until the other day, and I felt like a fool for not realizing it sooner.

Also, I love those microwavable bags of frozen broccoli and brussel sprouts. Sometimes I don't buy enough and sometimes I don't quite cook or wash them right, so the microwavable bags are much more economical and easier for me to deal with. I just nuke a bag, dump it in a bowl, put a few dashes of seasoning on top, and eat the whole bag.
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Old 02-08-2015, 10:31 PM
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I prefer vegetables that don't require much preparation. Usually I'll just chop up some broccoli and eat it raw. I also like fresh spinach leaves and romaine in a salad, with a sliced boiled egg and drizzed with some homemade Italian dressing. Mmmm...

I don't much care for kale (too bitter), but I buy a lot of it because my parakeets go crazy over the stuff. Has anyone tried "baby kale"? I think they just pick it when the leaves are smaller but I wondered if it changes the flavor.

pointzeroeight, could you share your kale caesar recipe? I'd like to try it. I think I need to give kale another chance.
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Old 02-10-2015, 12:13 PM
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Default Greenies: Talk about Vegetables

Baby kale is just that, younger kale. It definitely doesn't have the same bitterness (which I've hardly ever noticed to be honest), and is also considerably less tough.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Rivers View Post
pointzeroeight, could you share your kale caesar recipe? I'd like to try it. I think I need to give kale another chance.


Happily! This one is actually from the book, Salad Samurai, which I cannot recommend enough.


  • 2 bunches curly kale (I prefer Russian red kale)


  • 1/2 cup cashews soaked in 1/2 cup hot water for 30 minutes (keep water)
  • 3 cloves garlic (or way more depending on preference; if you can get purple garlic, 2 cloves of that should be good, and is my preference)
  • 1 tbs olive oil
  • 2 tbs lemon juice
  • 1 tbs Dijon mustard
  • 2 tsp shiro miso (white) (this is miso paste to be clear)
  • 2 tsp sweet paprika
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne or hot paprika
  • 1 fire roasted red pepper, seeded



Wash and prep the kale, set aside.



Throwing everything else in a blender and blend until smooth. Stick it in a jar in the fridge to cool it down and allow flavors to blend. You can make this dressing a few days in advance if you want.



I tend to also make polenta croutons to go with this. It gets made weekly.

Last edited by pointzeroeight; 02-10-2015 at 04:59 PM.
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  #16  
Old 02-10-2015, 03:07 PM
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I don't really care for vegetables as I am a child, but I've become rather fond of collard greens and asparagus.
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Old 02-13-2015, 07:33 PM
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Originally Posted by R.R. Bigman View Post
I don't really care for vegetables as I am a child, but I've become rather fond of collard greens and asparagus.
Collard greens have a strange taste, but man asparagus is soooooo delicious when grilled!
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  #18  
Old 02-13-2015, 08:04 PM
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I am an enormous fan of asparagus now. Early in my life asparagus was always boiled and served with Hollandaise sauce, and I hated it. As an adult my tastes have changed, plus I don't boil and coat my asparagus in eggy butter like someone who's shamed of asparagus' existence, and I'm content to lightly steam it (or grill it, yes, it's great when grilled) and serve it with a squirt of lemon and a dab of olive oil. I still like it to crunch a little while I'm eating it.

My son still hates it, though, and I'm cool with that. One day he'll come around.
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Old 02-14-2015, 12:39 AM
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Basically every vegetable ever is just at "roast it" status for me now. Roast the vegetables. Why would you do anything else with them???
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Old 02-14-2015, 11:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul le Fou View Post
Basically every vegetable ever is just at "roast it" status for me now. Roast the vegetables. Why would you do anything else with them???
Same here. It has taken me far too long to realize you can just lightly coat veggies in a lil' bit of olive oil, stick 'em in the oven, and get delicious results with very little effort.
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  #21  
Old 02-14-2015, 07:23 PM
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When I was young I couldn't stand most vegetables, but now I use 'em a lot when cooking. I still don't like many of 'em raw (onions are the main offender there), but fresh vegetables are great for adding a kick of flavor to spaghetti and pasta sauce.

One of my biggest turnarounds was with spinach. I couldn't stand the stuff as a kid, but that's because as a kid my primary experience with the stuff was that watered down bitter crap in a can. Fresh spinach, I often have that on subs or use it with cherry tomatoes, garlic, and mushrooms when making chicken simmered in basil and tomato pesto sauces and served with bowtie pasta. It's great stuff.
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  #22  
Old 02-15-2015, 07:57 AM
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I couldn't stand the stuff as a kid, but that's because as a kid my primary experience with the stuff was that watered down bitter crap in a can.
Wha... I thought that was just something they made up in Popeye!

Personally, I've always loved spinach. As a child I liked the frozen kind because the texture was neat. These days I'll have it any way I can get it.
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Old 02-15-2015, 09:43 PM
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I cooked asparagus for the first time ever today. It was ridiculously easy! Just like roasting any vegetable, really. I need to buy asparagus more often now.
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  #24  
Old 02-17-2015, 07:13 PM
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I cooked asparagus for the first time ever today. It was ridiculously easy! Just like roasting any vegetable, really. I need to buy asparagus more often now.
Too bad a fresh bunch of asperagus is so expensive.
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  #25  
Old 02-17-2015, 07:18 PM
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Quote:
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Too bad a fresh bunch of asperagus is so expensive.

Likely depends on season and where you are. It's pretty cheap here. Organic even.
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Old 02-23-2015, 01:17 PM
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This weekend I went to two meals with a vegan group and they were awesome! The first was a potluck held at a health food store after hours. About 25 people came. I brought whole wheat spaghetti with roasted tomatoes, chickpeas and basil. I brought quite a bit and people took nearly all of it! People put a printed recipe under each dish so others could avoid unwanted ingredients and make it themselves if they liked it. When I got in line I put samplings of about a dozen different dishes on it, making a glorious mess.

The next day we went to a mixed Asian restaurant where we reserved tables. There were about six different entrees to sample off a big Lazy Susan.

Unfortunately this area is spread out and this club has a lot of its meetings several towns away, but I'm damn sure going to make their monthly potlucks. I've never been part of a vegan club before so my past ventures into vegetarianism felt lonely. I better get a big vegan cookbook soon!
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Old 02-24-2015, 12:52 AM
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if you're not eating parsnips you're REALLY fucking up, tbh
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Old 02-24-2015, 04:36 AM
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Parsnips aren't green.
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Old 02-24-2015, 05:28 AM
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I think you'll find that most parsnips are at least 50% green
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Old 02-24-2015, 07:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mopinks View Post
if you're not eating parsnips you're REALLY fucking up, tbh
Roast them with carrots. It's amazing.
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