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  #1  
Old 08-14-2007, 11:18 PM
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Default What'cha reading?

Thread title's self explanatory, I assume (and hope :P).

I'm currently winding my way through the Bourne Identity. I'm about halfway done, and it's striking how much of the book got cut out or changed in order to fit into the movie plot and the change in time (from late 70's, early 80's to 00's). It makes you realize just how good a job the people in charge of the screenplay were. I'm still on the fence on whether I actually like the book or not. Have to finish it and see.

Next up: Parasite Eve (once I track down a copy, anyway)
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Old 08-14-2007, 11:26 PM
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I'm rereading the second book in Clive Barker's Abarat series. I hope he hurries up with the third one. This is taking forever.
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Old 09-05-2007, 06:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon View Post
I'm rereading the second book in Clive Barker's Abarat series. I hope he hurries up with the third one. This is taking forever.
I seriously second this! I thought maybe he had given up with this!
Anyway, I am working my through Charlaine Harris's Lilly Bard mystery series. I enjoy her Southern Vampire series which is going to become an HBO series directed by the guy that did Six Feet Under, I'm excited.
I am also in the fourth book of the Otori trilogy. It is not nearly as good as the first three so I am having a hard time getting through it.
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Old 09-05-2007, 07:47 PM
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I'm currently on Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child's Book of the Dead, having recently re-read all the Pendergast books lately. After that I'll finally get to my friend's copy of Legacy of the Drow that's been sitting in my bookshelf.
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Old 09-05-2007, 09:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Anonymooo View Post
I'm currently on Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child's Book of the Dead, having recently re-read all the Pendergast books lately. After that I'll finally get to my friend's copy of Legacy of the Drow that's been sitting in my bookshelf.
The new Pendergast novel, Wheel of Darkness, came out recently. I've picked it up, but I'm not really in the mood to read anything right now.
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Old 09-05-2007, 10:47 PM
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currently reading the excellent biography of John Adams by David McCullough.
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Old 09-06-2007, 03:12 PM
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Originally Posted by sraymonds View Post
The new Pendergast novel, Wheel of Darkness, came out recently. I've picked it up, but I'm not really in the mood to read anything right now.
I'll buy that when it comes out in paperback--Pendergast is the man (Renaissance FBI Ninja!) but he's not a cool-enough character to make me buy a hardback that's not on sale. And I know that feeling--I'll probably stop reading for a little while after I'm done with Book of the Dead. XD
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Old 08-14-2007, 11:27 PM
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I was almost considering bumping the old topic. This is fine though.

I have the Gunslinger and 1984 checked out, and also decided to get The Hero with a Thousand Faces after the mention in the HG101 Vagrant Story feature. Read through a part of the Gunslinger and like it, but I just really haven't felt like going through more of it. I already renewed it twice, I may have to just return it in the end unfinished.
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  #9  
Old 08-14-2007, 11:42 PM
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just finished Heat by bill buford (a former editor of the new yorker goes and works for mario batali, and all sorts of other awesome food porn), and am working through diamond age by stephenson.

also, obligatory DL book of the month--The Rebellion (stonetellers 1) by Jean Rabe.
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  #10  
Old 08-15-2007, 12:04 AM
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Maximum City, by Suketu Mehta. A big, sprawling, hyperkinetic look at the similarly-characterized city of Bombay*. It's completely fascinating.

* He's a native, from before it got renamed/re-Anglicized to Mumbai.
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  #11  
Old 08-15-2007, 12:05 AM
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dude, i LOVE Maximum City! Its such a damned awesome book in so many ways. makes me yearn for my home back in india.
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  #12  
Old 08-15-2007, 12:41 AM
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I sadly don't have much time to read anymore. But when I get back to it, I'm still in the midst of George R.R. Martin's A Clash Of Kings.
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  #13  
Old 08-15-2007, 10:58 AM
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Just finished a few of Pratchett's discworld novels, Going Postal and Moving Pictures. The former was great, and the latter was good, but not as amazing as some of his stuff. Now I'm starting on Dune, because I need to start reading some more (actually, any) sci-fi, and it seems like it'll get me in a decent political bent of mind that I need for the story I'm trying to write now.

I also keep going through A Feast For Crows because Martin won't quit writing fan-fiction long enough to finish A Dance With Dragons.
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  #14  
Old 08-15-2007, 12:26 PM
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I think I'm gonna hit Watership Down by Richard Adams next, mostly thanks to Donnie Darko.

Once school hits, I'll have no time for reading what I want, as I'll be stuck reading assigned books like Alice in Wonderland. Why an Advanced Placement senior english class is reading a children's book, I'll never understand.
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  #15  
Old 08-15-2007, 12:36 PM
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I've been reading the Nixon tapes off and on because you can only take so much in one sitting.

I'm almost done with Brothers: The Hidden History of the Kennedy Years by David Talbot. It's basically an outline of all the events and policy changes that made people hate the Kennedys. It also gives in-depth profiles of the Band of Brothers that does nothing more than make me a bit sad when I slowly realize that we may never see a US government that pure and optimistic ever again. Plus learning about all the bat shit generals in the Joint Chiefs is scary as hell. It's amazing how close this country was to a bloody coup after the Bay of Pigs.

The big surprise though is how not evil Fidel Castro is and was. Oh silly US media and your anti-communist propaganda.
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  #16  
Old 08-05-2008, 11:01 AM
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Currently reading Stephen R. Lawhead's Dragon King trilogy. After that, I'll probably be reading Twilight, if only because it's my end of a Faustian bargain intended to get my sister to read The Hobbit. After that, I'll have to punish myself with either His Dark Materials or Eldest. I honestly can't decide which I'd least like to read: Pullman's ham-handed religious criticism, or Paolini's shitty plagiarism.

I'm also re-reading That Hideous Strength by C.S. Lewis at work. I bring in books I've already read because it's easier to pull myself away from a book when I already know what's happening in it. It's less likely to make me late coming back from breaks.
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  #17  
Old 08-06-2008, 05:08 PM
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I'm reading The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie by Muriel Spark. Short book - I started it at work tonight (I'm working the very quiet late shift) and I may well finish it before I go home. About 1930s Edinburgh schoolgirls and their, er, unique teacher. Recommended, and I'll be reading more Spark. Great prose style. And funny. And understands people.
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  #18  
Old 08-20-2008, 09:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolf View Post
After that, I'll have to punish myself with either His Dark Materials or Eldest. I honestly can't decide which I'd least like to read: Pullman's ham-handed religious criticism, or Paolini's shitty plagiarism.
Pullman's stuff is good children's/teen fantasy fiction. The religious elements are a bit eh, but then, he ripped that (along with the entire setting) from Michael Moorcock anyway. I can't say I think first of religion when I think of the trilogy - much like Final Fantasy Tactics, it's an important element, but the fun fantasy adventure is the main point of it all. Seems like it was received differently in the US, though.

I just finished Empire of Dragons, because Romans VS Chinese is a grudge match that's been a long time coming.
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  #19  
Old 08-23-2007, 11:59 AM
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I'm kicking myself for not having picked up the Dune series earlier now. I just flew through the first two books, and the ending of Dune Messiah made it one of the few books that has moved me to tears. Granted, I'm a sucker for that type of resolution, but still, two beautifully crafted books. I'm starting on Erickson's Malazan series and another Discworld book before I dig deeper into Dune.
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Old 08-23-2007, 12:24 PM
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no, dont do it! the first two books are masterworks of literature. the rest are not.
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  #21  
Old 08-23-2007, 03:12 PM
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As poor as the latter Dune books are, they are masterworks of literature compared to the Kevin J Anderson-penned tie-ins.
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  #22  
Old 10-10-2009, 06:27 PM
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I'm surprised Karen Miller's Godspeaker trilogy hasn't been brought up, in spite of being ten shdes of awesome. It's really a diamond in the rough though, as every other Miller title I've cracked open--The Rogue Agent trilogy and both Kingmaker Kingbreaker books--has undeniably sucked. (Speaking of which, the first Rogue Agent book has entire paragraphs and pages out of place. It makes me question what her editor was smoking) Still, I can't recommend Godspeaker highly enough. The savage pre-historic culture of the first book is deliciously realistic in the context. Plus, the books can be hollowed out to conceal small firearms (the smallest is 717 pages).

Your mileage may vary, though, as most reviewers seem to dispise the first book, while it's easily my favorite of the three.
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  #23  
Old 10-10-2009, 10:07 PM
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I just finished Penelope Fitzgerald's short novel The Bookshop. I liked it, but I get the impression it's not her best novel. It's very much a quiet slice-of-life book, but it's also very wise. The plot - widow opens up bookshop in small and uncultured English town - might sound trite, as if it were Chocolat in England with books. It's not. For one thing, the ending is less than happy. Good book, and I look forward to reading more Fitzgerald. I understand her last novel, The Blue Flower, is a masterpiece.

I'm now reading one of Ruth Rendell's Inspector Wexford novels, Some Lie and Some Die. Rendell is remarkably prolific; this comes from her early, "traditional" period. It's good, though thus far not a classic of the mystery genre. Some very nice descriptions of the English rural landscape, but I haven't gotten far enough to really judge the plot. I get the impression that Rendell's best novels are her stand alone stories of madness and murder. Certainly her stand alone short stories are wonderful.

I should finish Some Lie and Some Die tomorrow, as it's quite short and I'm a fast reader. Perhaps I'll follow it up with Roberto Bolano's The Skating Rink, another murder mystery (of sorts). On Tuesday, Hilary Mantel's Booker-winning historical novel Wolf Hall finally shows up in US stores. I'm quite excited to read it.
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  #24  
Old 10-12-2009, 04:01 PM
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Finished Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer, I thought it was pretty good. The visual elements and how they were used was an interesting change from most other novels I've read, and I liked how Oskar knew about a lot of things the average 9 year wouldn't have known to make it easier for adults to relate to him, yet was kept fairly realistic in his ignorance of things his peers knew about or we'd expect someone of his age to know about (the average 9 year old DOES know what pinball is, right?), not to mention his overall mentality being more like a kid that knows a lot of things without actually comprehending them. I'll have to check out Everything is Illuminated sometime, after I get through more of my backlog.

Speaking of which, I carelessly added more by picking up Perdido Street Station by China Mieville, The City & The City's cover kept grabbing my attention, I looked up to see if he was really worth checking out, and decided to grab PSS while I had a 40% off coupon. For now though, I think I'll move on to The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman, I don't expect that to take too long to read.
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  #25  
Old 06-12-2013, 04:22 AM
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(hi there, nice to meet you all)

Well, I'm about to read ...

The King of Elfland's Daughter by Lord Dunsany,

and Kino to Tabi (Kino's Journey) series by Keiichi Sigsawa,

and half-way through Chinese historical fiction featuring Liu Ji of Yuan Dynasty, wrote by my friend.
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  #26  
Old 06-12-2013, 08:54 AM
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So "The Magic Bed Knob" and "Bonfires and Broomsticks" aren't a book so much as a pair of charming short stories that don't go quite the way you expect them too, because Mary Norton has never heard of genre conventions. Bless. It makes a rather slight story about English children more enjoyable than it might be.

(And the illustrations are charming, too. Hurrah.)
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  #27  
Old 06-12-2013, 09:49 AM
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Also it has Angela Lansbury.
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  #28  
Old 01-02-2008, 08:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyblue View Post

Next up: Parasite Eve (once I track down a copy, anyway)
PLEASE, PLEASE, if you ever find a copy you have to tell me where you found it... i'll thank eternally
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  #29  
Old 01-02-2008, 08:16 PM
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Just finished reading Eldest... very boring if you ask me, but i just had to know what happens with the characters xP, now i started the subtle dagger from Pullman and next in line is Spares from Marshall Smith : D
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  #30  
Old 01-02-2008, 10:25 PM
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I'm reading The Golden Compass.

Also, I've been flipping through The Onion's "Our Dumb World" lately, and it's fantastic. Like, the page for Nicaragua is 100% about NES "Contra." Genius.
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