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  #61  
Old 04-19-2016, 05:32 PM
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Egarwaen Egarwaen is offline
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Originally Posted by Kalir View Post
And just to let you know, you have to take down the Operative too, otherwise the Chairman just goes right into the discard. (YES THIS MEANS HE CAN BE SHUFFLED INTO THE DECK AND DEALT AGAIN.)
I... Don't think so? There's nothing on his card or the Operative's card that says this. He works the same way Omnitron does if you kill it and there's still Drones out; he's destroyed and leaves play but he doesn't go into the discard. Functionally I'm not even sure how this would work, since neither of his cards have a Chairman card back. "Huh I wonder what that card on top of the villain deck is. Guise, how about you play that card that discards the top card of every deck? Wow, it was the Chairman after all!"

It'd also make the Oversized Chairman super awkward.

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Originally Posted by Kalir View Post
Good Strategies:
Tanking. I've got two Chairman wins in my play log, one with Legacy + Wraith (and H=5), the other with The Scholar (and H=4). And I'm pretty sure the Scholar game he just sat there behind Flesh to Iron flipping everyone off. Being able to say "Nah" to the Operative's counterattack damage makes dealing with their minions so much easier.
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  #62  
Old 04-19-2016, 05:43 PM
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It's an incredibly unlikely scenario to be sure, but the main function for him is that he doesn't have an incapacitated side like the Operative (or the similarly functioning Ennead or Vengeance mode). He gets destroyed like any other villain target. Which puts him in the trash, which lets him be played again.

Omnitron's text explicitly states that it's removed from play. And if it does happen against the Chairman, it's annoying but by no means irrecoverable.

Last edited by Kalir; 04-19-2016 at 06:14 PM.
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  #63  
Old 04-19-2016, 06:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Egarwaen View Post
And I'm pretty sure the Scholar game he just sat there behind Flesh to Iron flipping everyone off.
This is kind of what The Scholar does every game, mind.
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  #64  
Old 04-20-2016, 11:44 AM
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Akash'Bhuta

Danger Levels
  • Minions: Middling
  • Direct Offense: High
  • Disruption: Middling
  • Defenses: Middling
  • Ongoings: Low
  • Deck Randomness: Middling
  • Nemesis: The Argent Adept

Too much crime. Let's dial it back, and just talk about nature. I really like that Akash'Bhuta is a villain for some reason, because while the concept of nature gods isn't really a new one, they're usually portrayed as benevolent and harmless, when nature is anything but. The world is huge, it is unforgiving, and it is here to punch you in the face.

Akash'Bhuta functions using Primeval Limbs as extensions of itself, which is the only reason it gets away with having the highest max health in the game at 200. Whenever a Primeval Limb is destroyed, Akash'Bhuta deals herself damage equal to its max HP. These things also have a pretty unique interaction with the environment deck, which I'll discuss on her two sides in more detail.

Chaos-Bound Creator
Both sides use the same flipping mechanic, and it's when the environment deck shuffles its trash into the deck. As one would expect of a nature god, Akash'Bhuta and the environment are closely linked. Whenever an environment target enters play on this side, it chains into a villain card play. But by that same token, whenever a villain target (i.e. a Primeval Limb) enters play, it discards the top card of the environment deck. For the most part, this won't be a huge problem unless the environment makes it one. In environments with few targets, such as Rook City, this can usually even out by getting rid of a lot of bad cards (although they'll still be played at the same rate, so it's not easy to control).

Advanced: All villain targets get a damage reducer. Given Akash'Bhuta's high health, and the fact you'll want to attack multiple foes a turn, this is legit kind of hard to deal with, if only for the sheer amount of time you'll have to throw into taking the villain down.

Avatar of Destruction
Akash'Bhuta functions very similarly here, except that instead of keying off of when villain and environment targets enter play, it keys off of when they are destroyed. This leads to a cycle in target-rich environments of bringing out lots of targets to accelerate both villain card plays and environment discards, and then threatening even more card plays when she flips and you have a whole swath of environment targets to bring down. Needless to say, try to ignore the environment as best as you are able here and focus on bringing down Primeval Limbs (especially Living Rockslides).

Advanced: Defense on the creator side, offense on the destroyer side. The interesting part is that Akash'Bhuta targets based off of H minus 1, but isn't choosy about whether it's hero or environment targets she hits. Which means she can accelerate the environment destruction, which means more card plays. Try not to give her much of a chance to do that and keep as many Primeval Limbs in check as you can.

Good Strategies:
  • Wide-Scale Area Damage: Remember, every single Primeval Limb is effectively just an extension of Akash'Bhuta, so any damage you deal to them is damage dealt to her, later down the road. Depending on the method you use to attack all the Primeval Limbs, you might hit some environment targets too, which is a call you'll have to personally make. It might be better to use things with slightly more controlled aim even if you don't hit as many targets, but I'd personally just go nuts and swing for the fences.
  • Environment Deck Control: Controlling Akash'Bhuta's deck isn't that important, honestly. Probably her meanest card is Primeval Eruption, but that creates a bunch of Primeval Limbs, which just lets your area attackers kill her faster. Better to devote your deck control efforts to the environment, so as to get non-targets out faster and control the top-deck discards from Akash'Bhuta's target card plays. Or to just lock the damn thing up with an Adhesive Foam Grenade, that's good too.

Bad Strategies:
  • Target Rich Environments: For a stupid time, fight Akash'Bhuta in the Final Wasteland. (Or Dok'Thorath Capital or the Enclave of the Endlings. HAHA TRICK SUGGESTION DOK'THORATH IS ALREADY STUPID) There will be so many cards on each side, and you will be facing down approximately fifty kajillion instances of damage, and you will die, and it will be hilarious. Don't fight Akash'Bhuta in target-rich environments unless you're ready to drastically accelerate both decks.
  • Excessive Support: The main reason I advocate this is because of Ensnaring Brambles: if you only have one damage dealer on your team, you run the risk of them getting walled off from actually doing damage for far longer than is reasonable. This goes double in environments with cards that can prevent damage, like the Realm of Discord. Try to make sure everyone can contribute to bringing down Primeval Limbs at all times.

Notable Cards
  • Entomb: Got an ongoing destruction effect? Good, great, fun. If you don't, Entomb is mean for two reasons. First, a start of turn H damage attack is exactly as mean as it sounds. And second, on the off chance even a single hero character mitigates this (hi I'm Tachyon and this is Synaptic Jackass), Entomb doesn't leave play, meaning you have to deal with the same problem next turn.
  • Living Rockslide: This card is subtly meaner than it appears at first glance, which is funny because it's already a bulky card that deals area damage. The fun part here is that it targets the environment as well as the heroes, meaning Akash'Bhuta can kill targets there herself, accelerating card plays even faster. If at all possible, make these things your highest priority when fighting Akash'Bhuta.
  • Allies of the Earth: She only has the one copy of this in her deck, because having any more would be HELL. Whenever an environment target enters play, Akash'Bhuta heals for the same amount as that target's max health. Oh hi Immutus brb healing more than Haka's entire lifebar. Of course, this is entirely dependent on the environment, but so is the entire fight. This and Entomb are both good points for bringing ongoing-destruction effects, even if you don't plan on using them every turn.

Last edited by Kalir; 10-26-2016 at 03:20 PM.
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  #65  
Old 04-21-2016, 02:27 PM
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Apostate

Danger Levels
  • Minions: Middling
  • Direct Offense: High
  • Disruption: Low
  • Defenses: High
  • Ongoings: Middling
  • Deck Randomness: High
  • Nemesis: Fanatic

The nemesis rules, prior to Infernal Relics, were mostly there for flavor's sake. Yeah, the mutual damage is there to encourage fighting your nemesis directly, but few, if any, villain decks were designed around the nemesis fighting them. Apostate is one of the few instances where it's basically two separate fights: one where you bring Fanatic, and one where you don't. His deck and character are just so fine-tuned around the possibility of Fanatic being in play, it's worth fighting him twice, once with and without her. Shame his Relics are so damn annoying.

Infernal Emissary
Apostate plays basically like how you'd expect a villainous version of Fanatic to play. His unique sword Condemnation starts in play, and he uses the melee attack from that in conjunction with his Exorcism-esque innate attack to hit the ground swinging for plenty of damage. Since he does at least two attacks a turn from this, damage reducers are nice to have. The main thing to note here is his mechanic for flipping. Every Relic card he plays is a potential Aegis of Resurrection for him, which might be easier than actually destroying the relic in question. For Fanatic, it usually is easier!

Advanced: Apostate also begins play with the Tome of the Unknowable in play. This low-health Relic revives Condemnation if it's dead when the Tome is destroyed, and plays a villain card whenever a hero draws a card. This is honestly not a huge problem for an Advanced trait unless it is because of deck randomness. As long as he doesn't deploy something to protect it first, make the Tome your first priority.

Dark Corruptor
Most games, you won't ever see this side. Flipping Apostate to this side heals him for 20, and destroys the lowest health relic. He maintains the same flip-revive effect on this side, except it destroys the highest health relic and doesn't heal Apostate. In fact, it only triggers dependent on his HP total: you can still kill him with destroy effects like Wrathful Gaze or Sucker Punch on this side! His attack on this side is weaker, but it hits the lowest HP hero and heals him slightly, so don't leave him here too long: flip him to this side only if you can't make a dent in his relic network.

Advanced: Whenever a Demon card is destroyed, Apostate plays a card. This is, again, not too bad most of the time, because if you've actually made it to this side, demons are the least of your worries. Hell, if you're doing it right, you're leaving Relic Spirits alone, because no way are you gonna revive multiple relics at once.

Good Strategies:
  • Irreducible Damage: Runes of Malediction give every relic 2 points of damage reduction. Condemnation and the Periapt of Woe, which both improve Apostate's offense significantly, already have innate damage reduction. The Corrupted Effigy revives the Runes or searches the deck for them. The Orb of Delirium redirects relic damage to itself and has a lot of HP. This is a ridiculously efficient defensive network, which can be made much more manageable with even a single source of irreducible damage. Parse steps up to the plate against Apostate and breaks every single one of his things like they don't exist.
  • Damageless Target Removal: This fight is one where things like Wrathful Gaze, Final Dive and the like is actually a really strong option. Apostate's Relics have relatively low health, but incredibly high defenses, so being able to destroy them (or even just remove them from play for a moment via Into the Stratosphere or similar) can open up a weakpoint for everyone else to exploit. This is also incentive to ignore the relics and attack Apostate: yeah, it makes the Tome of the Unknowable and the Periapt of Woe impossible to kill, but maybe it'd be more efficient to just force him to consume one to stay alive.

Bad Strategies:
  • Killing Relic Spirits: Is there a relic you don't like in the trash? Congrats, don't kill Relic Spirits. Like, target prioritization is already really important against Apostate for how hard it is to kill everything and the order in which you have to kill things, but the Relic Spirits exist to taunt you into killing them. Don't do it. The healing they provide the other relics isn't worth reviving them all by killing them. Only kill a Relic Spirit if there are literally no Relics in Apostate's trash.
  • Heavy Setup: As you might've noticed, Apostate's setup cap is almost as good as yours. But he has the Apocalypse on his side, and you don't. Even End of Days can't stop him here: it kills demons (including Relic Spirits WHAT DID I JUST SAY) but can't touch Apostate's relics. If you DO plan on going heavy setup, prioritize defenses over offenses and get an ongoing destruction card in hand as soon as you can, just so Apocalypse can't screw you over.

Notable Cards
  • Periapt of Woe: In an alarmingly common trend, Apostate has lots of damage instances on any given turn, but they're individually... I don't wanna say "weak", given Condemnation and Remorseless Provocation exist, but tolerable. Unless he has the Periapt of Woe. Then all of those damage instances are a little bit sharper. And with its innate heavy damage resistance, the Periapt is really hard to destroy. Even if you don't care about the massive defense array of his Relics, the Periapt is reason enough to bring irreducible damage and destroy effects. It has low enough health to be instagibbed by Final Dive, so that's nice.
  • Profane Summons: And here we are. This card is usually what sets up Apostate's ridiculous defensive array almost instantly. If you have a deck control specialist, and they see this and Apocalypse on the top of his deck and can only keep one? TAKE THE APOCALYPSE, IT HURTS LESS.
  • Apocalypse: The reason Apocalypse hurts less is that, like Forced Deployment, you can take it down before it does the actual field-wipe effect, but unlike Forced Deployment, you don't get punked if you do destroy it early, because it doesn't kill anything if it dies early. And as mentioned before, if a card destroys an ongoing card when it's destroyed (Bee Bot), use it to destroy Apocalypse before it touches your stuff or Relic Spirits. Apocalypse kills his demons, too. We don't want Relic Spirits dying, remember?
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  #66  
Old 04-22-2016, 09:43 AM
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Gloomweaver

Danger Levels
  • Minions: Middling
  • Direct Offense: High
  • Disruption: Low
  • Defenses: Middling
  • Ongoings: Low
  • Deck Randomness: Middling
  • Nemesis: Nightmist

On the one hand, Gloomweaver being a Cthulhu-esque elder god bent on madness and despair, but themed after voodoo rather than aliens? That's a legit neat idea. On the other hand, Gloomweaver being in the comics world of Sentinels Comics means he comes off less as Lovecraft, more as Blizzard. So it's a wash. Anyway Gloomweaver is another boss where the difficulty ratings in the book are a bald-faced lie: Gloomweaver is arguably as big a chump as they come. I don't know that I'd put him at difficulty 1, but there's no way he earns 3.

Gloomweaver has a few keywords to watch for. First: his Relics. All three are beefy and annoying targets, and you want to devote as much of your time to bringing them down as him. Second are his Voodoo Pins. These enter play adjacent to a hero and generally mess up their day. But they're targets, so you can attack them like anything else.

Nightmare Walker
First, Gloomweaver starts with H Zombie Servants in play. These each have 2 health and deal H minus 2 damage, they're cannon fodder in every sense. Second, Gloomweaver is supposed to not fully be summoned into our world in this phase. For this reason, if he gets all three Relics of his in play, he flips, and if they're all trashed, hooray we instantly win! He also auto-reanimates any cultists that die into Zombie Servants. But he, um. He doesn't actually do anything else on this side? And you don't need to kill the Relics either, you can totally punch him to death even without them.

Advanced: A lot of people I know think Gloomweaver needs to be played on Advanced to make him an actual threat. I sort of agree, but immunity to melee and projectile damage, while covering a lot of heroes, doesn't really rectify the problem in full. (Hey look I'm running Ra, Tempest, Absolute Zero, and the Visionary.) I'd even go so far as to argue that if you REALLY want Advanced, Gloomweaver should be immune to damage on this side, full stop.

Demon-God Incarnate
When he flips to this side, he regains H times 10 health. I'd be more concerned if I ever actually saw this side enter play. Anyway, he can't flip back once summoned, so relics trashed or in play no longer matter. He also actively attacks on this side, for Voodoo Pins plus 2 to the H minus 1 highest health heroes in play. Which is, y'know, actually kind of a threat, but again, if you ever get to this side in the first place, you hosed up somewhere along the line.

Advanced: He also attacks the lowest health hero for H infernal damage! That is... legit a mean thing to encounter. But again, you just have to not get to this side in the first place to fix this.

Good Strategies:
  • Damage Reduction: While the Crimson Pin does provide Gloomweaver a source of irreducible damage, reducing Gloomweaver's damage output, even on their Nightmare Walker side, does a lot to nullify the threat he poses. Most of his disruption effects are choosing between damage or disruption, and it's easy to choose damage when he can't deal any. His Cultists aren't much scarier: the only one that's actively dangerous if you have damage reduction is the Chosen Disciple, since she ramps up her power with the Zombies in play, and Zombies can get quite a few damage reducers out.
  • Deck Control: Gloomweaver doesn't have any deck acceleration outside of Vast Following, and finding the Relics and putting them in play (or in the trash directly, Sky-Scraper) while chucking all of his Vast Followings into the bottom of the deck makes things go even more smoothly. This also lets you pace your way through the Relics, so you don't have to deal with a bunch of them back to back, and it lets you avoid building up Zombie threats (which can theoretically happen: Profane Zealot, Strength of the Grave, Pouch of Bones, and Chosen Disciple all together are SCARY).

Bad Strategies:
  • Ignoring Cultists: Just because you have a lot of other tempting targets and the cultists can revive into zombies doesn't mean they're something you should ignore. They are arguably the most actively dangerous cards Gloomweaver has. Again, Profane Zealot and Chosen Disciple can work together startlingly well, and the Cursed Acolyte does two H minus 2 attacks across the field, which if you don't have damage reducers? Hurts. But they're all really fragile, and one or two zombies in isolation don't mean a damn thing, even with Strength of the Grave out.
  • Turtling: If you aren't keeping up with your damage output and just focusing on turtling through Gloomweaver's attacks, not only will that give cultists opportunity to set up their theoretical despair combos, you might actually let Gloomweaver flip, at which point you start facing probably a bit more damage than you'd actually like. I mean, you basically need to completely forget to deal damage for this to happen, but details.

Notable Cards
  • Indigo Pin: This is probably Gloomweaver's most actively annoying card, and his best disruptor. It goes to the hero with the fewest cards in play and forces them to discard at the end of their turn. Unlike most other discard effects in the game, Indigo Pin chooses at random. This is awful and terrible and awful, and until it's dead, don't get your hopes up with any cards you draw, because that may have to be the card you chuck into the trash until your pals can get the pin loose.
  • Pouch of Bones: The other Relics Gloomweaver has are both very similar and ineffectual if you have any damage reducers. But the Pouch of Bones makes the Zombies he plays actually halfway a threat. It's persistent enough to give them enough defense to stick around for a few turns, and heals every villain for H when a zombie enters play (i.e. when you kill a cultist). This and the Profane Zealot working together make Zombies actual persistent threats: try not to let this happen, and if it is a concern, bring somebody with irreducible damage or high base damage.
  • Vast Following: This card is dangerous for the same reason the Chairman is dangerous: by design, Gloomweaver's going to have a lot of things in his trash (because you put them there), and you want those things to STAY in the trash. Either he revives Relics and undoes your hard work, or he revives Cultists, which in turn become Zombies AGAIN when they die. And it plays the top card of the deck on top of that. And he has 3 copies of it. This is another reason to stay on top of bringing down cultists: it dilutes the possibility of Gloomweaver reviving Relics via this card.
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  #67  
Old 04-22-2016, 01:45 PM
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While easy, Gloomweaver's fun to play against for a similar reason to Plague Rat - the debilitating effects he hits heroes with can sometimes turn your game-plan on its head.

Though nothing beats the sheer destructive potential of Mr. Fixer V Plague Rat. "Oh, I'm poisoned. Awesome. Now I'm going to beat everyone else to death."
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  #68  
Old 04-23-2016, 02:10 PM
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The Ennead

Danger Levels
  • Minions: None
  • Direct Offense: High
  • Disruption: Middling
  • Defenses: Middling
  • Ongoings: None
  • Deck Randomness: High
  • Nemesis: Ra

You damn kids don't know how good you had it. When I was your age, we didn't have no fancy-schmancy Vengeance mode, no sir! If we wanted to take on multiple villain characters at once, it was the Ennead or bust! And we LIKED it, and we were grateful for it! Sure, Tefnut was universally awful, Set was a constant mess, and all the bookkeeping got even worse when several incapacitated effects were involved. But you damn kids are so spoiled these days with your separate villain turns and decks. This is exactly what's wrong with millenials.

Wasn't all sunshine and roses for them, neither! They all had to share one deck, and they don't even all show up in one game: they only start with H villains in play, and if you didn't get the one you liked? Tough: wait for them to play Taste of Immortality or Rise to Power! And since they also had to all share one turn, they used the hieroglyphs of Fire, Earth, and Death on the cards to activate their villain abilities, rather than having a clean solo turn. I bet you whippersnappers are so cavalier about playing villain cards in a turn, you wouldn't even stop to think that doing so would give them a whole second turn in practice.

The Power of the Ennead
Inactive members of the Ennead are kept under the Shrine of the Ennead, indestructible but not in play. You don't have to defeat all of the Ennead, just the members currently out. And since they have health totals comparable to heroes, it's not a big problem to take down any one member. You just need to be mindful of the hieroglyphs that activate them, and their incapacitated abilities, and take down the ones that get the most dangerous abilities or have the least offensive incapacitated side. Instead of notable cards for this deck, I'll discuss the three keywords at the bottom and which villains utilize which ones.

Advanced: The Shrine plays a card from under it at the start of the villain turn, so you'll be dealing with a lot of villains, and in turn a lot of keyword combo-ing. Take down the key targets even more quickly!

The Ennead in Force
The good news is, they can't revive any more members of the Ennead. The bad news is that they instead regenerate for H minus 2 every villain turn. This isn't as big a deal as you'd expect, because again, you're likely focusing on bringing down one at a time, but if you ARE relying on area attacks, keep up extra pressure to compensate.

Advanced: Damage boost! Damage boost bad. Every single member of the Ennead is a potential attacker, since their cards also decide who attacks based on highest/lowest HP. Again, you really need to pile on the pain before they reach this point. You don't need several Ennead members combo-ing at you with a damage boost.

Good Strategies:
  • Blocking Villain Card Plays: This is a good strategy against every boss, but even more so here. Without the ability to play cards, they lose their ability to chain keywords together, and therefore most everything that'd happen on the villain turn. All they get are the defenses of Nuit and Shu, which barely match up to most villain turns. Even the Matriarch gets counterattacks when robbed of card plays.
  • Target Prioritization: As a general rule of thumb, you want to take down anyone who can potentially combo villain card plays, such as Atum or Set. You also more or less always want Nuit gone, since she blocks damage for everyone else and her incapacitated ability is only a threat in very specific environments. The only incapacitated abilities that are actually dangerous are Tefnut, Set, and possibly Shu and Osiris. Outside of that: look for keywords that crop up the most, and keep an eye on the discarded cards, since there's roughly equal amounts of each of the three in the deck (six Death, seven of the other two). Base your next target off of that if no better ideas come up.

Bad Strategies:
  • Cards that Affect Non-Character Cards: There's lots of targets in the Ennead by design, but you don't have any minions or ongoings to deal with. Ergo, anything that would deal with those kinds of cards is wasted in this fight. Their deck is literally one-shots for days. Just focus on good old beatdown strats and worry less about stopping their build-up through conventional villain methods.
  • Turtling: The faster you bring down members of the Ennead, the less they can combo at you. The longer you take to build up, the longer you end up risking Taste of Immortality or Rise to Power giving you another villain to deal with. And don't try relying on things like Stun Bolt or the like: you can't easily predict which members of the Ennead will deal damage. If you DO plan on using them, focus on the lowest health member, since if nothing else it blocks Elemental Storm, which hurts like hell if it's not reduced.

The Three Keywords
  • Earth: Triggered by Ancient Magicks, Elemental Storm, and the Desert's Wrath, which are largely area attacks and disruption. Fittingly, most of the Earth keywords here are area attacks, and there's only one that isn't an attack, namely Shu's healing. Which likewise means there's no acceleration effects here. If your defenses are all in order, Earth cards are probably the least dangerous of the lot. And since all Earth cards originate their attacks from the lowest HP villain, you can focus on them with damage reducers to nullify them further.
  • Fire: Blast of Flame, Mass Overheating, and Sun's Fury (which is just Mass Overheating but without the disruption effect), unsurprisingly, all deal fire damage. Their attacks always originate from the highest HP villain, which makes them a little harder to control like Earth cards. The good news is, there's very few Fire keywords on villain cards: Nuit's self-heal, Shu's healing (which triggers on the first Fire OR Earth card), and Set's card play. That last one is more than dangerous enough, though.
  • Death: There's only two Death cards, Death's Grasp and the Grave Beckons, but both aim to kill your weakest heroes. Death's Grasp is twice as common, which is goodbad because the Grave Beckons instakills any non-villains at 3 or less health (BYE UNITY). Atum and Osiris both use Death cards in really mean ways: Atum searches for and plays a Fire card, and Osiris forces everyone to discard and deal themselves 1 psychic. The other Death effects are pretty tepid: Isis uses it or Earth to attack the hero with the most cards in play, and Nephthys heals the villains. Needless to say, Atum and Osiris are the bigger threats to take down.

Last edited by Kalir; 04-23-2016 at 03:07 PM.
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  #69  
Old 04-24-2016, 11:25 AM
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Ambuscade

Danger Levels
  • Minions: Middling
  • Direct Offense: Middling
  • Disruption: Low
  • Defenses: High
  • Ongoings: Low
  • Deck Randomness: Middling
  • Nemesis: Haka

And finally, the first mini-pack villain. Ambuscade posits the theory of an evil Jean Claude van Damme, one that hunts the even more dangerous game than the most dangerous one. From playing against him, he seems kind of like an early attempt to be Iron Legacy: someone meant to have lots of attacks and defense, but with little maximum health. Since all of his Devices are targets, you can and should blow them all up to limit his capabilities to shoot you.

You can also blow up his Trap cards, but you don't want to. When they enter play, they get shuffled face up into the villain deck, and if you ever reveal one from there (even through deck control options or Armed and Dangerous!) it gives him a beefy attack. It's rare that these actually survive long enough to get played, but since Ambuscade shuffles his deck and accelerates his card play enough, you need to be careful.

Superhuman Hunter
Ambuscade starts with H minus 1 devices in play. If one of those devices is his Personal Cloaking Device, he instantly flips, so that's neat. Anyway, Ambuscade's devices give him extra attacks and defenses. Some attacks come from the Devices, and some from Ambuscade himself wielding them. Even without Devices, he ends each turn by attacking the highest health hero for H minus 1 projectile. Which in a vacuum? Totally tolerable. But keeping all of his Devices in check is difficult.

Advanced: Ambuscade gets a point of damage reduction on this side. Since he can already increase his defense even further with Reactive Plating, this can add up quite a bit and render him untouchable. It still does nothing for his Devices, so keep 'em destroyed.

Invisible Stalker
Ambuscade only flips to this side when the Personal Cloaking Device enters play, and he flips from this side at the start of the turn if it's not in play. This means that it takes a bit of time to actually stop cloaking him, which in turn makes him immune to damage for the remainder of the round it gets destroyed. He has two copies of Vanish that revive/search it, and Armed and Dangerous can, of course, potentially field it. The real problem with this side, though, is that Ambuscade switches from highest to lowest HP hero target for his attacks, without lessening the damage he deals. This is a problem.

Advanced: Ambuscade's damage on this side is irreducible. I mean, your strategy for this is the same as without: break that Personal Cloaking Device ASAP. It just means that the damage reducers you'll already have out will just be a bit weaker until then. But again, you'll already be actively working on fixing this as soon as the cloaking device enters play.

Good Strategies:
  • Damage Reduction: It seems like the meta in the core game of high-damage single attacks has since shifted to multiple smaller attacks as time has gone on, now that the devs have realized the implications of having all these damage amplifiers and reducers out. In any event, Ambuscade not only has lots of attacks on their turn with their Devices, but out-of-turn attack possibilities with the Sonic Mine and Reactive Plating, so reducing damage overall is a good idea, ESPECIALLY when Charged Attacks hits the field.
  • Multi-Target Attacks: Not to be confused with area attacks. Yes, you want to destroy lots of Devices. But attacking indiscriminately will trip the above-mentioned Sonic Mines and Reactive Plating. That aside, you'll have a lot of targets to deal with, and incentive to hit as many as you can. Bring your Taiaha. And hey, if you run out of Devices to hit, Ambuscade only has 50 HP. That's barely a number in this game.

Bad Strategies:
  • Deck Control: Even outside of having one of the few active counters to sifting through his deck with his Trap cards, Ambuscade shuffles and accelerates his deck so much that controlling his card play is almost impossible. The only kind of control you should actively try for is blocking villain card plays, and that's a rare and expensive option for many heroes. Much more efficient to just shoot his Devices and call it a day.
  • No Setup: Yeah Ambuscade only has 50 HP, you might be tempted to just play heroes with low setup ceilings and just go nuts at him. But the Personal Cloaking Device and Sonic Mine kind of require you to have an option for your turn that doesn't involve dealing lots of damage, lest you suddenly find yourself with nothing to actually do. Doesn't really matter WHAT it is, so long as it's something aside from "bleeh guess I'll draw two" like some kind of Absolute Zero.

Notable Cards
  • Charged Attacks: This is literally the one ongoing card in Ambuscade's deck. It is worth bringing an ongoing-destroy effect just for Charged Attacks. The damage boost for Ambuscade is bad enough, but giving him an area counterattack every time you destroy a Device? No. Not okay. Again, he only has the one copy, but remember, Ambuscade shuffles and accelerates enough that you'll probably actually see it at some point in your game.
  • Personal Cloaking Device: While Haka doesn't have as much interaction with his nemesis as Fanatic does with hers (nobody does, really, except for Omnitron-X but they're really weird), he CAN use Savage Mana to steal Ambuscade's Personal Cloaking Device, thus preventing him from ever flipping. I mean, I guess his Hakas can also be useful to deal with his other stuff, but Haka can eat the cloaking device is the big takeaway here.
  • Sonic Mine: This one is one that, like Relic Spirits, you'll usually want to leave alone. However, if you block the damage it deals (which doesn't originate from Ambuscade like literally everything else) you're fine. Hypersonic Assault is one of the best ways to disarm Sonic Mines, although we also accept Thorathian Monolith, Ground Pound, Heroic Interception and other similar cheating options.

Now to environments, once again! How long it's been.

Last edited by Kalir; 04-25-2016 at 02:01 AM.
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  #70  
Old 04-24-2016, 02:01 PM
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Honestly, I think the Infernal Relics villains, while they've got some issues, are some of the best-designed villains in the game. The Ennead is basically "Citizen Dawn, only actually fun to fight"; Gloomweaver is a clever idea even if his mechanics don't always quite gel; and Apostate and Akash'bhuta play with assumptions about the scale of damage and health in ways that actually matter on the board and give you options for how to fight them. They're definitely a huge step up from the Rook City villains, who can, by and large, be summarized by "But what if we took the raw hate and turned it up to 11?" or the core set villains, who've got some neat concepts but generally don't realize their potential.
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Old 04-24-2016, 03:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Egarwaen View Post
The Ennead is basically "Citizen Dawn, only actually fun to fight"
That's kind of how I feel about Carmen Sandiego La Capitan, myself.
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Old 04-25-2016, 10:35 AM
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I do agree that Infernal Relics is where they really started figuring out their own game and how to balance it. Which is funny, because that's also the one physical non-Vengeance set I don't own.

Pike Industrial Complex

Checklist
  • Hero Support: Yes (Biomemetic Plasma Vat)
  • Hero Disruption: Yes (Supercooled Trisolvent Vat)
  • Field Damage Modifiers: Yes (Irradiated Cyclohexane Vat, Biomemetic Plasma Vat)
  • Villain Acceleration: No
  • Hostile Targets: Yes (Escaped Lab Rat)
  • Indiscriminate Field Damage: Yes (Supercooled Trisolvent Vat, Chemical Explosion)
  • Alternate Loss Condition: No

It's always tough to come up with your favorite for games like these, isn't it? Particularly in instances where there's so much choice to go around. But I think I can safely say that Pike Industrial Complex is up there. Being disruption-minimal is nice, but what's even better is the fact that it does exactly what an environment should do: become a huge threat if left unchecked, and a still solid one even if you do keep it under control. And it's even polite enough to do it in two different ways.

Good Strategies:
  • Damage Reduction: This is one environment where the Visionary actually wants Mass Levitation over Mental Divergence. The only threat Pike Industrial Complex can field is damage, either from rats or vats. Pike Industrial Complex is very, very good at dealing damage. Supercooled Trisolvent Vat does the ever popular three attack combo of 1 cold, 1 energy, and 1 toxic, which can be modified by the other two vats. And the more vats out, the harder a Chemical Explosion hits. And if the Experimental Mutagen gets out? Yeah. Be ready for more damage here.
  • Irreducible Damage: Likewise, you don't want the villain to suddenly step into invincibility when Biomemetic Plasma Vat hits the field, nor do you want Escaped Lab Rats with a few Experimental Mutagens behind them wrecking your day. It doesn't have to be much irreducible damage, you can even sub in "just deal more damage because I'm Ra and it's what I do" if you like, but be ready to deal with damage reduction for everybody.

Bad Strategies:
  • Damage Type Dependency: Absolute Zero loves the Supercooled Trisolvent Vat, but he COMPLETELY HATES the Irradiated Cyclohexane Vat. It doesn't just increase damage by 1, it also converts all damage ever dealt ever to toxic. This also makes this Plague Rat's home turf, because he has one of the few toxic-immunities in the game through Sewer Fiend. If you plan on running a damage dealer, try not to be concerned with dealing a specific damage type over others.
  • Finishing Off Villain Targets: They'll die eventually, trust me. And you'd much rather have the Escaped Lab Rats doing that for you rather than letting them chew on your team, especially if they've got a few Experimental Mutagens. Of course, that's a best case scenario: what'll ACTUALLY happen is that a Chemical Explosion will wipe the field for you whether you like it or not. Focus your damage on the main villain whenever possible.

Notable Cards
  • Chemical Explosion: This card is at minimum a 3 damage attack to everything in the field. At MINIMUM. If your heroes have any environment control or destroy effects, save them for the vats to prevent them from ramping up and making it suddenly an 8 damage attack across the field. It's funny exactly once.
  • Experimental Mutagen: When this card enters play, it revives all the fallen rats, and it's destroyed when you've defeated at least two rats. This card makes it tougher, giving them an extra point of offense and defense per card. Did we mention that there's two copies of this in the deck, and four rats? You really don't want both copies in play at once.
  • Supercooled Trisolvent Vat: Again, this deals 1 damage each of cold, energy, and toxic to everyone, which DOES get modified by other vats. It also punishes most heroes for playing cards with another 1 cold damage. This is a kind of consolation prize for Absolute Zero since the other two vats ruin his day, but is otherwise a significant nuisance. Unless you have damage reducers in which case GOOD LUCK I'M BEHIND SEVEN MEGA COMPUTERS.
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Old 04-25-2016, 11:19 AM
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Unity loves Pike Industrial Complex. Which is pretty thematic. Bee Bot's ability to interrupt environment cards by destroying them when it explodes lets you keep those awful vats of chemicals pointed at the villains.
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Old 04-26-2016, 01:07 PM
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Rook City

Checklist
  • Hero Support: Yes (Dr. Tremata, Tony Taurus)
  • Hero Disruption: No
  • Field Damage Modifiers: Yes (Twisting Back Alleys, Blighted Streets)
  • Villain Acceleration: Yes (Twisting Back Alleys, Blighted Streets, Scum and Villainy)
  • Hostile Targets: Yes (Ambitious Racketeer)
  • Indiscriminate Field Damage: Yes (Toxic Sludge)
  • Alternate Loss Condition: No

There's only one way through Rook City: the hard way. The Ruins of Atlantis are dangerous because all of their cards have the potential to ruin everything, but Rook City is dangerous because most of its cards have a strict anti-hero bias. There are only two actively good cards in Rook City, and like anything else good in Rook City, they tend to die off really, REALLY fast. Play in Rook City if you think the usual Advanced rules for your preferred villain are too weak to pose a threat.

Good Strategies:
  • Villain Disruption: Rook City gives the villain of the day plenty of stat boosts and card play acceleration, so if you have good ways of keeping that villain off balance by blocking these card plays or their damage, Rook City becomes slightly less likely to break your legs and take your wallet. I say "slightly", because there's two copies of each of the offense and defense boosting cards in Rook City, they're both really hard to get rid of, and there are several possible sources of extra card plays from Scum and Villainy alone.
  • Environment Control: Despite all, there's still two good cards in Rook City, and they do an excellent job of keeping both the villain and environment decks in check. Your first job in any game with Rook City should be to get Dr. Tremata and Tony Taurus out and keep them alive. Reducing or blocking villain damage to them certainly helps, but it's not a full thing. Do note that they're fully 2/3 targets in Rook City, the third being another solely-hero-hostile target, so don't expect you can just fight the environment by conventional means. Bring Adhesive Foam Grenades, Flash Flood or a Bio-Engineering Beam.

Bad Strategies:
  • Taking Built-In Environment Destroys: Excuse me? You, Twisting Back Alleys, want me to play a card from Rook City AND the villain deck to destroy you? How about I just take the damage penalty and call it a day? Or better yet, how about I Flash Flood you off the face of the earth? The only one you should actually bother doing is Toxic Sludge, because it lets you destroy multiple environment cards at the start of the environment turn, which is going to be more than a little essential to not dying.
  • Keeping The Good Cards Out: After they do their thing, Dr. Tremata and Tony Taurus get punched for H damage by the villain, UNLESS the lowest HP hero gets punched instead. Straight up, this is not worth it, unless that hero is already immune to damage. They're gonna die, it's gonna suck, but better them than you.

Notable Cards
  • Ambitious Racketeer: Hey look, a hostile environment target in Rook City! Unfortunately, this guy is hard to bring down in many cases, with his high base health, innate regen, and several other better targets for environment-destroy effects. The curious thing is that while he does attack a lot of hero targets, it's entirely up to the players which ones he chooses to attack. Captain Cosmic loves having this guy around: oops, hit the Vitality Conduit and the Dynamic Siphon and the other Dynamic Siphon.
  • Toxic Sludge: It says a lot about Rook City that something that hits the field for 3 and 2 toxic damage is one of the cards you most want to see. It doesn't hit anyone at low health, which is a double edged sword: yeah, it probably won't clean up villain minions, but it won't punish critically-wounded heroes either (i.e. all of you, probably). It also lets you destroy a lot of environment cards at once, which may be a high necessity in Rook City.
  • Blighted Streets: The destroy condition on this one isn't too bad. It's functionally just a weirder version of skipping your turn that's a little lighter on many heroes, particularly those with heavy card draw and defensive abilities like Haka, Tempest or Bunker. Unfortunately, destroying it at all drops another villain card play, which is exactly as bad as it sounds. Still, you can't just let that damage boost sit around all day: better rip that band-aid off fast.
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Old 04-27-2016, 12:53 PM
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Tomb of Anubis

Checklist
  • Hero Support: Yes (Rod of Anubis, Idol of Anput)
  • Hero Disruption: Yes (Swarm of Scarabs, Spike Trap)
  • Field Damage Modifiers: Yes (Cast Into The Underworld, Mdjai)
  • Villain Acceleration: No
  • Hostile Targets: Yes (Mdjai, Anubis, Shamise, Nomti)
  • Indiscriminate Field Damage: Yes (Judgment of Anubis, Swinging Blades, The Challenge of Fire)
  • Alternate Loss Condition: No

If you really want to do the "hostile environment with a few really nice cards" thing, the Tomb of Anubis is one of the best implementations yet. Make no mistake, though: it IS hostile, and you will have a lot of work to do. That said, it's not every day you find cards that grant your heroes extra powers, but by clearing Trial cards when the Treasure cards are out, you can add some very handy options to all kinds of heroes.

Good Strategies:
  • Environment Destruction Effects: While there are a lot of cards you can fight head-on in the Tomb of Anubis, many of them are solid enough that you'd much rather just destroy them outright. This is also much cheaper than the conditions on the Trial cards, and destroying Trials quickly is a good thing. It does bear repeating that you can fight a LOT of the threats within the Tomb of Anubis head-on, though, so if you don't have as many environment-destruction effects? That's okay! Just swing at them normal-like and save the effects you DO have for the trials with costs to destroy them.
  • Multiple Power Uses: The fact that the environment can give you extra powers means it's important that you actually have inclination or capability to use those powers. The powers granted vary a bit in their utility, too. The Rod of Anubis isn't too handy for most of the damage-focused heroes, since if they're doing their job right, 2 infernal damage is barely worth bothering with, but support-focused characters lacking reliable offense options might like it. The Idol of Anput is useful to just about anybody, but particularly characters who have no real pressure to use their power on any given turn, like Tachyon.

Bad Strategies:
  • Ignoring Environment Targets: It's not hard to bring down a Mummy or two given a bit of focus, but it IS hard to win if you let Akana or Urshe survive any longer than they need to. The Trials will do damage, it'll suck, you'll deal with it. It's much harder to deal with them when the environment self-accelerates and throws out about six things to deal with at once. Yes, Mdjai blocks for them, and yes the villain is still doing their thing while this is going on, but as anyone who's faced the Chairman can tell you, sometimes you need to punch past the guards and take down the leadership, fancy-schmancy defense boosters or no.
  • Reckless Offense: You need plenty of damage to handle both the environment and the villain, but that's no reason to ignore your defenses. There is a LOT of damage flying around here, and it is VERY indiscriminate about where it goes. Moreover, every time something dies, Anubis takes their soul to the Underworld, but not before beating someone over the head with it. Know when to back off and let the environment fight the villain for you, and keep your defenses stable against the many, many area attacks.

Notable Cards
  • Swarm of Scarabs: In a vacuum, this card isn't very interesting, it's a Traffic Pileup that works slightly differently. But the difference in how it works speaks to the mentality the devs have at this time about the value of damage reducers and amplifiers. It has half the health of Traffic Pileup, but it reduces damage by 1. And it's even more valuable to bring down than Traffic Pileup since it counts as a Trial. This places a LOT of worth on a single point of damage reduction, don't you think?
  • Anubis: Two things. First, Anubis is the first instance of a card that isn't a villain character card that has a nemesis symbol. Even though he's an environment target, he is still a full nemesis of Ra. Which, y'know, makes perfect sense! And this gets re-used in later decks, especially in Vengeance mode. Second, Anubis attacks whenever non-environment targets get destroyed. Making sure you can control the state of villain and environment attacks becomes very important in the Tomb of Anubis, and the big jackal-man himself is a huge part of that.
  • Urshe: Environment deck acceleration is a pretty rare thing: usually, most villains that can do it already have enough they do on their own to make it a huge deal (The Chairman) or focus more on environment disruption in conjuction with acceleration (Akash'Bhuta). Urshe is a rare example of a card within the environment that accelerates itself. And it goes exclusively for Trial cards, which is half a good thing (gets you those Treasure faster!) and half a bad thing (MORE TRIALS KILL YOU FASTER). I don't like leaving this guy alive for the same reason I don't like playing games like IWBTG.
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Old 04-28-2016, 01:00 PM
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Realm of Discord

Checklist
  • Hero Support: Yes (Time Flies, Ghostly Images)
  • Hero Disruption: Yes (Time Crawls, Spinning Vortex, Imbued Vitality, Ethereal Bonds)
  • Field Damage Modifiers: Yes (Imbued Frailty, Time Crawls)
  • Villain Acceleration: Yes (Time Flies)
  • Hostile Targets: Yes (Explosive Bubbles, Portal Fiend, Ethereal Bonds)
  • Indiscriminate Field Damage: Yes (Explosive Bubbles, Negative Energy Field)
  • Alternate Loss Condition: No

Well, huh. Turns out when you try to style an environment after alternate non-Euclidean dimensions, it ends up being really weird in practice. Lots of rules get broken, some new rules get added, things will just HAPPEN here. It's not easy to adapt to the constant changes in how things work in the Realm of Discord, but if you CAN? It'll help you and your team out a LOT in the long run.

The Realm of Discord is most notable for its Distortions. There are seven in total, and they all modify the playing field in one way or another, but once a new Distortion enters play, it destroys all older Distortions. So don't get attached to any one Distortion for too long, and don't be upset if one you really dislike shows up. Everything changes here.

Good Strategies:
  • Environment Deck Control: Since controlling the cards that are played gives you a degree of control over Distortions being destroyed, it's far better to keep an eye on the environment deck than to simply have environment destruction effects (although you still want those for Portal Fiends, suckers are beefy). In particular, Time Crawls is good for maintaining a lead against the villain, Imbued Frailty and Imbued Vitality are good for getting an out-of-control villain in check, Positive Energy Plane is good for villains with few minions... just get creative and roll with the punches, but know what punches are coming.
  • Varied Hero Composition: Similarly, the many Distortions and the like within the Realm of Discord, being as widely punishing and helpful as they are, favor different heroes to different degrees, so try not to make too homogeneous of a team when facing off here. You don't want a bad Distortion to roll in and cripple your entire team long enough for the villain to finish the job.

Bad Strategies:
  • Ignoring Environment Targets: The good news is, Portal Fiends aside, most everything in here is both fragile and fairly non-threatening. Okay, the Ethereal Bonds are ANNOYING, but by no means impossible to handle. Still, you don't want them sticking around wrecking things for any longer than is necessary. And again, Portal Fiends can get very dangerous, very quickly, and they have a lot of health. Try to destroy them outright if at all possible, but if you have to beat them up through raw damage, do it.
  • One-Track Heroes: Again linking to the point above about a varied hero team: you don't want a hero that only specializes in one or two things. If you need your play AND your power, Time Crawls walls you, but if you don't have enough of either, Time Flies wrecks you. Imbued Vitality is great if you have lots of gear since it can now tank for the team, but Ghostly Images would rather you have lots of one-shots. Try to have a large number of options at any one time.

Notable Cards
  • Imbued Vitality: All Ongoings and Equipment have 6 health, which means they are now targets. This has a lot of implications but is mostly favorable for heroes, simply because you can now destroy ongoings without needing a specialized hero or a one-shot to do it. It also means that in most normal situations, your gear becomes the lowest-health hero targets, which in turn gives you a bit more tanking potential, at a cost to your stuff. This works best with Ongoings/Equipment that destroy themselves eventually, like Slip Through Time, or Ongoings/Equipment that provide a penalty while active that you would rather not use your power to destroy.
  • Spinning Vortex: Devious Disruption Lite. Like Imbued Vitality, this lets you clean up your gear that you didn't want in play anymore, like Bloody Knuckles. Unlike Imbued Vitality, it deals anyone who still has gear in play 3 sonic damage, or to be more accurate, it forces self-damage. So if you don't need any of your offensive gear at all, trash it all and wall the hit. That said, if you're fine with the 3 damage (or have something that can mitigate it), don't bother destroying anything.
  • Time Crawls: Time Flies, the sister card to this, is pretty simple: it gives heroes and villains extra card plays (and power uses, for heroes). But Time Crawls limits heroes to either playing a card or using a power. So what makes it notable is that it can't really apply that same limitation to the villain. Instead, it simply reduces villain damage by 1. This is honestly a pretty acceptable limitation in a lot of cases, unless the main threat of the villain in question isn't their damage output, as with Baron Blade or Deadline.
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Old 04-29-2016, 08:56 AM
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Silver Gulch, 1883

Checklist
  • Hero Support: Yes (Sheriff Pratt)
  • Hero Disruption: No
  • Field Damage Modifiers: Yes (Explosives Wagon, Water Trough)
  • Villain Acceleration: No
  • Hostile Targets: Yes (Cyrus Hayes, Matthew Hayes, Tyler Hayes)
  • Indiscriminate Field Damage: Yes (Explosives Wagon, Sustain the Portal)
  • Alternate Loss Condition: Yes (Lost in the Past)

Promo environment! And going with the high-tech characters seen in the other early promo packs... we're going back in time to the Wild West? Well... huh. Okay. Silver Gulch, 1883 is a mean town. To use the words of the official description: "the air is thick with swears and bullets". Which is HILARIOUS if you ask me, and also a good indication of what to expect: people getting shot, a lot. Explosions and Wilhelm screams will happen. It'll be fun.

It's not all fun and games, though: if you aren't careful, you could easily end up Lost in the Past. This card is a bit harder to actually lose with than the Self-Destruct Sequence, but it's also harder to directly influence. It auto-discards 2 cards when it enters play, and returns discards to the environment deck at the start of each turn. You lose if you end the environment turn with no cards in trash. The practical upshot is that you need to keep the pressure on and keep those Hayes boys away, or else you'll be staying here for a LONG time.

Good Strategies:
  • Multi-Target Attacks: Again, different from outright area attacks. Not that those are always bad per se, but hitting the Explosives Wagon is a very good way to die. You want to keep the environment chucking stuff in its trash to stay with a good path to the present. Don't worry so much about dispensing attacks towards the villains: if they have minions of their own, the Gunmen will do a lot of heavy-lifting in taking them down. Still go for the beefiest one periodically, like you do, and Sheriff Pratt will help in keeping everything in check for you.
  • Damage Prevention: Eventually, the Explosives Wagon is gonna go off, and it'll suck. You need to plan around this, and save your big damage-blocking cards for when you want it blown up yourselves. For extra credit, find a way to shield your team while letting it frag everyone else. This is much easier said than done: its on-death explosion amplifies both of its damage instances, and they're of two fairly disparate types. Your standard damage reducers still do a lot for that, and you want them anyway to keep them Hayes boys from causing you too much trouble.

Bad Strategies:
  • Minion-Less Villains: Something we learned when fighting Progeny: if you're in an environment where the hostile targets go for anything except highest HP, they are going to go for your weakest heroes, who are, if you're facing Progeny or Iron Legacy or even just plain-ass Spite, going to die really fast. Save the shoot-outs for a battle royale rather than a ten-pace duel.
  • Environment Acceleration: Gunmen like having Cover. At least two instances of Cover punish you for attacking them, and one (Stout Barrel) plays even more environment cards. This resolves to a lot of cards that stay out, and not many that just instantly discard outside of Sustain the Portal. You don't need the villain speeding things up any more than they already are here, that's a good way to stay Lost in the Past, or just plain shot.

Notable Cards
  • Sustain the Portal: Self-Destruct Sequence has a way to buy time via Maintenance Level, but that entire thing sucks out loud. Sustain the Portal is, like Lost in the Past, less punishing to have out, and gives players more control over the alternate loss condition. That's not to say it's easy to work with, more damage everywhere is a bad thing, especially because of that Explosives Wagon. But being able to Sustain the Portal gives you much better odds of not being Lost in the Past.
  • Water Trough: This one's neat. First off, it reduces fire damage to Gunmen by 2. This makes it a little harder for Ra to kill them, but more relevantly, it also renders them way more durable in the face of an Explosives Wagon. That said, it's not quite the most immediate thing to kill, not least because it ALSO globally amplifies lightning damage, which can be useful for the same reason the Leaking Room isn't pure hate (although it IS pure hate).
  • Matthew Hayes: It's worth discussing the Gunmen a bit more, and I'm going to go with the most dangerous one in the box. The lowest health non-Environment target is who he aims at, and he aims to kill, dealing an impressive 4 damage per shot. Straight up, this is NOT something you want to deal with. If you have a choice between finishing off environment targets and villain ones, go for the environment. Even in cases like Grand Warlord Voss, the environment is simply too dangerous to have pointed at you rather than the enemy.

Oh hey. That's those three sets done. Cool, next time we'll hit Shattered Timelines and The Scholar, Miss Information, and the Final Wasteland.

Last edited by Kalir; 08-22-2016 at 12:04 PM.
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Old 04-29-2016, 11:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kalir View Post
It's not all fun and games, though: if you aren't careful, you could easily end up Lost in the Past. This card is a bit harder to actually lose with than the Self-Destruct Sequence, but it's also harder to directly influence. It auto-discards 2 cards when it enters play, and returns discards to the environment deck at the start of each turn. You lose if you end the environment turn with no cards in play.
Er. Pretty sure it ends the game if you end the environment turn with no cards in the environment trash. Which means you're racing the reshuffle.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kalir View Post
Matthew Hayes: It's worth discussing the Gunmen a bit more, and I'm going to go with the most dangerous one in the box. The lowest health non-Environment target is who he aims at, and he aims to kill, dealing an impressive 4 damage per shot. Straight up, this is NOT something you want to deal with. If you have a choice between finishing off environment targets and villain ones, go for the environment. Even in cases like Grand Warlord Voss, the environment is simply too dangerous to have pointed at you rather than the enemy.
Given Voss's love of low-health minions, I'd think he'd be pretty awesome to have out VS Voss, since he'll do a lot of the minion-sweeping for you...?
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Old 04-30-2016, 12:33 AM
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Right, my bad. Very busy at work today, didn't have time to full proofread.
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Old 05-01-2016, 02:03 PM
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Kalir Kalir is offline
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Chrono-Ranger

Checklist
  • Reliable Damage: Yes (Compounded Bow)
  • Ongoing/Environment Destruction: Yes (Temporal Grenade)
  • Team Support Abilities: Yes ("By Any Means", Neuro-Toxin Dart Thrower)
  • Big-Ass Attack Option: Yes (Hunter and Hunted)
  • Deck Control: Yes ("No Executions")

Apparently this guy is a reference to a character named Jonah Hex? Okay. That's fine. All I know is that Chrono-Ranger is good at one main thing, and that is shooting people repeatedly with his trusty six-shooter. Every single one-shot in his deck has a 1 projectile attack in addition to its other effects, giving him potentially the highest chance of utilizing damage boosts.

And he has a couple ways of getting them himself: namely, his Bounty cards. Chrono-Ranger is a guy that really explores the mechanic of playing cards next to targets, and his Bounties provide boosts to the targets they're played on, usually on-kill benefits but sometimes constant ones. Additionally, many of his cards get more powerful the more Bounties are out, so you need to strike a balance of having Bounties out for those purposes and bringing down targets for the rewards.

Strengths:
  • Constant Damage: Again, literally every one-shot in Chrono-Ranger's deck has a 1 projectile attack on it. If he gets Jim's Hat on, he gets a bonus card play during his play phase. And "The Ultimate Target" lets him use a power almost whenever the target it's on deals damage (and also boosts his damage against that target). Bunker might have a Gatling Gun, but he only WISHES his firing rate could keep up with the Chrono-Ranger.
  • Strong Deck-Search: I'm of the opinion that Chrono-Ranger would much rather have his equipment and Bounty cards in his deck than in his hand, because Displaced Armory and Sudden Contract search for the card of his choice and bring it into play (and they shoot someone, because Chrono-Ranger one-shot). Displaced Armory can also root the trash, if you already have everything you need and just want more grenades, and Ranger's Mark and Bounty Board let you recall trashed Bounties. Chrono-Ranger can get himself set up exceptionally quickly.

Weaknesses:
  • Bounty Dependent: Again, while most of his Bounties have on-kill bonuses, three of his cards (Hunter and Hunted, The Masadah, and Danny-Boy) all want him to have more active Bounties out. And you need lots of targets to make these bounties worth it, AND all of your deck-search tools to make them count for it. To make matters even more tricky to balance, Hunter and Hunted not only magnifies all the damage you deal, it also magnifies the damage you take. If you play Hunter and Hunted at the right time, you kill the field. At the wrong time, you kill yourself.
  • Damage Boost Dependent: Even so, many people consider Hunter and Hunted the best card in his deck by far, solely because it's a damage booster, and a huge one, on a character who revolves around spamming 1 damage attacks. If you don't have that, or even "By Any Means" or "The Ultimate Target", your quick draws become useless the second a single point of damage reduction hits the field.

Notable Cards
  • "The Ultimate Target": First off: unlike literally every other bounty out there, "The Ultimate Target" doesn't destroy itself when the target is killed. You'll have to use Jim's Hat to get it to die proper. Second, in addition to the damage boost being Chrono-Ranger exclusive, this sucker lets you use a power the first time each turn that target does damage. Anyone that abuses counter-attacks lets Chrono-Ranger, in turn, spam whatever his favorite gun at the time is. Conventional practice has you throw this Bounty on the villain character and never look back, and I for one agree with this.
  • Eye on the Prize: Do a thing, draw a card, play a card. So play it at every chance, right? ...Not necessarily. You want to save these cards up until you get enough damage boosters to make the continued one-shot spam really worth it. I mean, think about it: would you rather add 1 damage to your first turn, or 6 to your fifth turn? "6? No way can you reach +5 damage as Chrono-Ranger without dying." AhahahahahahHAHAHaHAHAHAHAHAHAHA
  • "No Executions": In quite a few matchups, this bounty seems useless on paper. Which isn't strictly true: you still want it out to ramp up your cards that still use Bounties. But there are a few matchups where it can save you a LOT of trouble. The main thing is that bringing down someone with "No Executions" means they aren't technically destroyed, which means on-destroy effects don't trigger. It also hinders villains likely to search their trash for whatever you just blew up. You can do a lot of very silly things with this card if you know how.
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  #81  
Old 05-03-2016, 09:58 AM
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Omnitron-X

Checklist
  • Reliable Damage: Yes (Rocket Punch)
  • Ongoing/Environment Destruction: Yes (Disruptive Flechettes, Bio-Engineering Beam)
  • Team Support Abilities: Yes (base power, Innervation Ray)
  • Big-Ass Attack Option: Yes (Defensive Blast)
  • Deck Control: Yes (base power)

You get zero points for guessing who this guy might be a reference to. Anyway, Omnitron-X is one of the first instances of a villain turning heroic, a theme that becomes more popular the further in you go, but which is ESPECIALLY prevalent in the Shattered Timelines expansion (an alt version of Bunker is actually his Vengeance Five counterpart, Fright Train, having joined the Freedom Six). And rest assured, Omnitron-X is just as good at getting a full suite of terror up as well as employing sudden immediate destroyer attacks.

Omnitron-X relies on two types of cards to keep itself in business. First, it has lots of Components. Like its villainous prior form, these cards are all destroyed if it takes too much damage (5 in one turn), but afford automatic start-of-turn effects, and pretty consistently strong ones at that. To keep these cards in play, Omnitron-X relies on Platings, which reduce damage of certain types by 2 points. In addition to making Omnitron-X incredibly survivable against inflexible bosses, they give it the hardiness it needs to keep all its cool toys intact.

Strengths:
  • Start of Turn Effects: It's usually said among our group that Omnitron-X, once set up, gets two turns: their normal play/power/draw, and all of their start of turn options from Components. Which, thanks to the ever-valuable Electro-Deployment unit, includes card draw and card play in addition to the power-like auto-attacks and team healing provided. In fact, if you play a Component at the start of your turn, it'll trigger later down the line that same turn! (Don't play Slip Through Time at the start of your turn, though: it wastes the effect.)
  • Emergency Attacks: Even outside of your start of turn chain of about five or so hero base powers, you have some VERY strong options for changing the game drastically. Defensive Blast requires a Plating in play and one in hand to discard, but deals as many as four instances of 1 damage. Omnitron-X and Unity are best buddies: one Hasty Augmentation on this and you're hitting the field for 3, FOUR TIMES. And of course, Self-Sabotage and Singularity let you turn all the stuff you and your team no longer needs into devastating single/area attacks. Oh, did we mention Disruptive Flechettes, AKA Area Ball Lightning?

Weaknesses:
  • Frail: Omnitron-X is second only to the Argent Adept for low starting HP, and while their setup ceiling is almost as high, they can be very easily disrupted by one unexpected attack. The game we discovered not to fight Progeny in Insula Primalis, I was walling off basically all of their attacks and doing incredible things with the Elemental Exochassis... until an Enraged T-Rex walked over and asked me what the hell I thought I was doing. Always always ALWAYS be ready for the possibility of your stuff exploding without warning.
  • Expensive: Don't get me wrong, a full suite of Components out doing things for you is incredibly powerful, and maybe you just want the constant benefits rather than the heavy attacks. But if the heavy attacks are what you need, be prepared to pay a lot for it. Self-Sabotage WILL blow up lots of your Components (unless facing another Omnitron deck in which case you can totally blow up their cards instead), and while Singularity is theoretically even stronger, that's only if you're also okay with destroying all of your pals' stuff too. (They will not be okay with this unless they are already in really hot water.)

Notable Cards
  • Bio-Engineering Beam: And despite all of the cool things your Components can do, one of the most valuable cards in Omnitron-X's deck is a power-granting Ongoing that destroys environment cards effortlessly. It's like you're playing the Visionary, except for environments! I mean, environment cards still do things as they enter play, but you can shut down the environment incredibly easy with this sucker.
  • Reactive Plating Subroutine: Irreducible damage always makes Omnitron-X sad. However, Reactive Plating Subroutine makes these otherwise-aggravating attacks sudden opportunities for counterattacks. And like the Isothermic Transducer, these are freely aimed! No self-punching Combat Stance or self-immolating Flame Barrier this! It still works on damage instances you reduce normally, mind, but only if they end up actually dealing damage after the fact.
  • Disruptive Flechettes: While still good, this card isn't NEARLY as ridiculously strong as its villainous counterpart. It only destroys 2 villain ongoings instead of all of them, which don't get me wrong, is still really good. It also sprays damage indiscriminately across the villain and environment play areas, which could be a bad thing, you don't want to hit the Dreamer or the Abject Refugees. Still: very strong, good card. I like it. Play it at things. Thank you.
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  #82  
Old 05-03-2016, 10:20 AM
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dtsund dtsund is offline
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Originally Posted by Kalir View Post
"The Ultimate Target": First off: unlike literally every other bounty out there, "The Ultimate Target" doesn't destroy itself when the target is killed. You'll have to use Jim's Hat to get it to die proper. Second, in addition to the damage boost being Chrono-Ranger exclusive, this sucker lets you use a power the first time each turn that target does damage. Anyone that abuses counter-attacks lets Chrono-Ranger, in turn, spam whatever his favorite gun at the time is. Conventional practice has you throw this Bounty on the villain character and never look back, and I for one agree with this.
For a really fun time, throw this card on Akash'Bhuta and get a free attack every time you destroy a limb.
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  #83  
Old 05-04-2016, 10:10 AM
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The Scholar

Checklist
  • Reliable Damage: Yes (Truth Seeker)
  • Ongoing/Environment Destruction: No
  • Team Support Abilities: Yes (Proverbs and Axioms, Don't Dismiss Anything, Alchemical Redirection, Offensive Transmutation)
  • Big-Ass Attack Option: Yes (Grace Under Fire, Know When to Turn Loose)
  • Deck Control: No

What do you get when you cross Nicholas Flamel with the Big Lebowski? The most dedicated tank character that Sentinels of the Multiverse has. The Scholar's job in any given fight is to sit there and be indestructible, and in turn prevent his teammates from taking damage because he's going to take all of that damage himself, except for the part where he isn't, and if he does he'll just heal it up anyway. Hell, I have a friend who refuses to run the Scholar anymore because in some fights it just drags on between him and an otherwise-aggressive villain with several incapacitated heroes feeding him cards.

And the Scholar will need to be fed cards, too: he has several Elemental ongoings that transmute him into different forms, which all aid his defensive capabilities in different ways. However, maintaining each of these forms requires a start of turn discard. They're not limited though, so as long as you have cards to discard, you can maintain as many as you feel inclined to.

Strengths:
  • Survivability: I'm not kidding when I say there's not a more dedicated tank in the game than the Scholar. Haka, Bunker, Legacy, and Absolute Zero can all be plenty beefy if they want to be, but even their defenses can't quite hold a candle to a constant 2 points of damage reduction AND constant healing. Alchemical Redirection lets the Scholar take hits for everyone for a turn, while Expect The Worst can block off anything that isn't irreducible. And the Scholar even has a way to heal teammates via Proverbs and Axioms.
  • Healing Efficiency: Flesh to Iron might be his essential card for being invincible, but the Scholar might not always want it out, solely so he can use his other two forms and his many, many ways of self-healing to execute silly combos. Solid to Liquid gives him a boost to all healing received (even from other heroes or environments) while Mortal Form to Energy lets him make a free attack for the amount he heals. Since you can't always heal if you're already at full health, you occasionally even want to take damage just to use more healing.

Weaknesses:
  • Card Draw Dependent: There's a difference between being a hero with strong card draw, like Haka or Bunker, and being someone who almost always needs to draw more cards. The Scholar's forms are all very nice and you'll want to keep them around, which is difficult if you're doing constant discards. Truth Seeker and Bring What You Need can HELP to alleviate this if you're not in need of healing (you are always in need of healing) but it always feels like if you're running the Scholar, all the card draw in your deck, while significant, just isn't enough.
  • Single-Focus: If you want to play as someone good at tanking, the Scholar is great. If you want to play someone who has support options or emergency attacks... the Scholar is okay. If you want to do basically anything else at all, pick someone else. Don't worry, you will be VERY good at tanking for everybody. But if you need someone to fight a thing, destroy an ongoing, control decks... nope. Just not even a thing you will be doing. Truth Seeker REALLY doesn't count, either: half the time you'd rather just Bring What You Need.

Notable Cards
  • Keep Moving: Hey kids, it's time to learn the difference between "draw/play a card" and "play a card" on a one-shot! And what a difference it is, too, especially for the already card-hungry Scholar. Remember, you have to discard a card to maintain the new form you've just acquired, AND using Keep Moving to get that form means getting rid of another card you could discard later down the line. Also: there's only three of each Elemental card in the deck. Don't go burning this to look for your last copy of Flesh to Iron when it's already in the discard.
  • "Get Out Of The Way!": On paper, this card looks amazing. And in certain situations (Grand Warlord Voss springs most readily to mind), it is. But the devil is in the details. First, anyone that doesn't get damaged doesn't count towards your self-heal effect. Which will happen a lot more than you think, honestly. And second, even if you do magnify or attack with the self-heal, you need a LOT of targets out and fighting for it to be really worth it. I mean, hitting two targets, healing yourself for 2, magnifying it to 3, and shooting one of those two targets for 3? Still good. Or you could just play one of Fanatic's lamer oneshots and use her base power or Absolution to actually do damage without discarding two cards at the start of your turn.
  • Don't Dismiss Anything: Now this is a good card, straight up. First off, trash recovery for everybody is REALLY nice, given some heroes with only a few copies of essential gear have very little, if any, trash-search capability. And in the event that isn't needed? Put the top card of your deck into play! (This does not count as you playing a card THEREFORE YOU CAN CHEAT PAST THAT OBSTRUCTION FOR REASONS) Just be careful around decks that have potential backlash in their cards, like Fanatic or Setback.
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  #84  
Old 05-04-2016, 10:38 AM
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Egarwaen Egarwaen is offline
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A few games ago, I had the privilege of watching the Scholar get run by someone who plays a lot of Blue in Magic. It was sublime.
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  #85  
Old 05-04-2016, 01:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Egarwaen View Post
A few games ago, I had the privilege of watching the Scholar get run by someone who plays a lot of Blue in Magic. It was sublime.
Wait, what?

Man, now I gotta get in on this.
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  #86  
Old 05-04-2016, 01:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Destil View Post
Wait, what?

Man, now I gotta get in on this.
The Scholar's all about managing card draw, discard-fueled ongoing effects, and the occasional trash fetch. Seemed to have a lot of skill overlap.
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  #87  
Old 05-04-2016, 01:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Egarwaen View Post
The Scholar's all about managing card draw, discard-fueled ongoing effects, and the occasional trash fetch. Seemed to have a lot of skill overlap.
But can I say "No."

...?
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  #88  
Old 05-04-2016, 02:22 PM
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But can I say "No."

...?
Well, to damage, yeah.

If you want to say no to villain card plays, you want Batman the Wraith.
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  #89  
Old 05-05-2016, 11:28 AM
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Kismet

Danger Levels
  • Minions: Low
  • Direct Offense: Middling
  • Disruption: Middling
  • Defenses: Middling
  • Ongoings: High
  • Deck Randomness: High
  • Nemesis: Setback

Kismet is a really interesting villain from a lot of angles. She's the only one who doesn't actually have any relation to her nemesis (they just share the same power, sort of, maybe), she's a villain you can steal the power source from and use against her, she's a villain that specializes in debuffs and lucky streaks, she's almost a straight up clone of that one Homestuck character... but she's also not really deserving of her difficulty 2 rank, I feel like. Tricky, certainly, but not actually much more difficult than, say, Deadline.

She has three unique card types, too. First is The Talisman. Not quite a character card, but still essential, it's an indestructible 7 health target that flips when destroyed and causes Kismet to flip as well. On the starting side, it gives her a damage boost depending on the number of Jinxes she has out (Jinxes being cards that stick next to heroes and apply constant impediments). When flipped, it goes to the hero with the highest HP, granting them a new power in the process that lets them look at the top 3 cards of ANY deck and rearrange them. Finally, she has Lucky cards. There are a few different uses for them, but by and large they involve granting her a degree of deck control.

Charmed Scoundrel
For example, on her starting side, she ends the turn by checking if the top card of her deck is Lucky. If it is, she instantly plays it. If it isn't, she shuffles her deck, rendering her fairly resistant to deck control. If someone's stolen the Talisman on this side, she flips at the start of the turn, otherwise she hits everyone for 1 psychic damage. Common opinion is that you want to flip Kismet as often as possible, but this is not strictly true. I'd say flip her away from this side quickly though, especially if her deck is being uncooperative via Lady Luck. Something to note: if a hero target hits another hero target hard enough (4 or more damage), you auto-destroy 1 Jinx card. This is rarely, if ever, worth it, unless your names are Ra and Absolute Zero.

Advanced: Kismet also gets a start of turn attack against anyone currently affected by a Jinx card. Remember, she gets a boost to her damage here with how many Jinxes are out thanks to the Talisman. You need to either snatch that sucker away quick-sharp here, or destroy every single Jinx that enters play.

Deranged Miscreant
Same flip mechanic here, but instead of attacking everyone for 1 if she doesn't flip, she hits the Talisman for 2 irreducible psychic damage. So she will eventually flip back to her older side. But she doesn't get her bonus card play or her deck shuffling, meaning you can use a mode of deck control (like the Talisman) against her without any problems. However, she really wants the Talisman back. At the end of the turn, not only does she heal on a per-Lucky card basis, she attacks highest health for 9 minus the current health of the Talisman. This attack can never exceed 8 damage since the Talisman just flips if destroyed, but that's a really meaty attack you don't want to take if you can help it.

Advanced: No, never mind, it got worse. All damage dealt by Kismet gets a H minus 2 boost. Granted, a lot of the damage being dealt in this fight will be between heroes, but she still deals more than enough damage instances herself to make this a really mean boost.

Good Strategies:
  • Ongoing Destruction: You CAN destroy Jinxes by attacking teammates. You do not want to do this. And even outside of that, Lady Luck is a really mean and persistent card that could take several ongoing destroy attempts to bring down if just done blindly. Mental Divergence is, as always, a really strong option here, but if you don't have the Visionary on your team, make sure you have someone who can pull up a few ongoing-destroy effects quickly enough.
  • Varied Team Composition: Kismet has a lot of Jinxes, and they're all bad to be hit by... but different heroes care less, or not at all, about different jinxes. The Visionary doesn't worry about Shaky Aim, Mr. Fixer can handle a Scattered Mind, Haka can walk just fine with Two Left Feet. Each Jinx still has the possibility of boosting Kismet's damage, but it's quite possible to ignore the actual Jinx effects.

Bad Strategies:
  • Not Using The Talisman: It's not just a hot potato you can flip Kismet with to negate her attacks, and if you treat it like that you'll waste more time on attacking it than you will Kismet. When you have it, put it to good use! Look at Kismet's deck and stack it while you can, or keep the environment in check, or even just help another hero get their stuff set up even faster. If you need to have bonus power uses to keep it up and running, that's fine, just have Fanatic bring Embolden. (And if you're really hilarious, damage boost Embolden's sustain cost... to destroy Jinxes! Why? BECAUSE IT'S GENIUS THAT'S WHY)
  • Extra Deck Control: Remember, unless you actually have the Talisman in front of you, Kismet either shuffles her deck or plays two cards a turn on her Charmed Scoundrel side. Since it's an end of turn shuffle/play, you'd need to see two cards into the future to do anything about it, which isn't really that easy to do. Better to just save those deck control efforts for the hero with the Talisman (or to take the load off their shoulders if they want to use their power for other things, as may very well be possible).

Notable Cards
  • Lady Luck: Aside from this card, there are only 7 Lucky cards in Kismet's deck. This means that if you're going to try to destroy ongoing cards, you either have to hope you're personally lucky, OR try to control the deck via the Talisman or a card play before destroying it. This isn't very easy to do, of course, not least because you'd need to cooperate with another hero or the environment to destroy a villain ongoing after using a power. But Lady Luck can wall off a LOT of ongoing-destroy effects, and that's not something you can afford to deal with.
  • Karmic Disjunction: This is the only card without a keyword in her deck, which is good because SCREW THIS CARD. By Shattered Timelines, the devs seem to have included a few "screw your control we're dumping several cards out at once" cards just to shake things up, but Karmic Disjunction is a really mean card even outside of this. First, it reveals H plus 1 cards, and plays all the Jinxes. But where most other cards would discard the rest and say "good enough", Karmic Disjunction shuffles the leftovers and puts them right on top of the deck. And if you're on the Charmed Scoundrel side and Karmic Disjunction was her first card play... well, Kismet isn't just a luck manipulator for flavor's sake.
  • Inconceivable Obstruction: It's so rare that I actually get to see this card end up in play vs. Kismet, which is a shame because it's honestly pretty funny. That said, in the wrong environments, Inconceivable Obstruction can drastically increase Kismet's lifespan while accelerating an already dangerous environment. Don't let this card survive in the Enclave of the Endlings!
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  #90  
Old 05-06-2016, 12:52 PM
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La Capitán

Danger Levels
  • Minions: High
  • Direct Offense: Middling
  • Disruption: Middling
  • Defenses: Middling
  • Ongoings: High
  • Deck Randomness: High
  • Nemesis: The Sentinels

La Capitán also doesn't deserve a difficulty ranking of 2. I'd personally put her at 3, but other people think she belongs at 4. It's not hard to see why, either: her crew fights dirty and shows up rapidly, her ship lets her sail through her deck and is hard to keep down, and she can steal your stuff and use it to block and heal, representing her fleeing through time with all of your things. Honestly, she's probably one of my favorite villains to fight overall. As was stated earlier, she's kind of like if Citizen Dawn wasn't blatantly terrible.

Time Corsair
To start off, La Capitán has her timeship La Paradoja Magnifica in play, which shuffles her trash into her deck and plays more villain cards for her. This is terrible, and killing the timeship is usually your most important goal at any point in time. She has a standard issue end of turn H minus 1 attack at highest HP. However, whenever she destroys a hero ongoing or equipment card using a card from her deck, it gets placed under her character card, since she steals it. Steal enough, and she flips. This WILL eventually happen, so your goal is to pile on as much hurt as you can before this happens, since that side drastically increases her defenses.

Advanced: Ordinarily, La Capitán doesn't actually have that many ways to destroy your things. Temporal Thief is usually her autoflip card, but it steals from the top of your deck. Past that, it's usually either The Amazing Mable's fault or a poorly-timed Plunder. On Advanced, she destroys one each turn. This is terrible. Again, dealing as much damage to her as fast as you can is imperative.

Split Across Time
Now that she has all your stuff, she and her crew make their getaway. All villain cards get a significant heal at the start of the turn, equal to the number of cards under her. She no longer attacks directly (although everyone else certainly does) but she becomes effectively immune to damage. Each time you hit her, you return a card she stole to its owner's trash. I cannot stress enough how important it is to keep the pressure on her here, that healing REALLY adds up, and even though she doesn't steal your stuff through normal means on this side, she still can with Temporal Thief. She also flips at the end of her turn rather than the start, so you still have to hope she doesn't throw Temporal Thief on her turn when dropped to 0 cards.

Advanced: Remind me never to fight La Capitán on advanced. On this side, the first time each turn she's attacked, that attack is redirected to the highest HP non-villain. I don't THINK it applies to attacks negated via cardsnatching though.

Good Strategies:
  • Constant Pressure: You need as much damage as you can field here. Her crew is all awful and does mean things to drastically different targets, but trying to prepare for and block each individual assault isn't possible. Your better bet is to simply keep attacking with whatever you have, bringing down her crew and her health total as rapidly as possible. Yes, the crew can come back via Raiding Party or A Motley Crew (which both do other awful things in turn), but La Capitán can come back from incredible losses if not constantly harried.
  • Target Prioritization: You will need to make some hard decisions about which of her targets to bring down on any given turn. Her crew and timeship are hardy enough that you might not be able to destroy them without overtaxing a few heroes, and you definitely won't get them all. So a few priorities: La Paradoja Magnifica and The Amazing Mable both need to be destroyed rapidly. L'Épéiste is critical to destroy lategame, Trueshot should effectively be ignored, and Battle-Forged and Final Breath are important if you have a hero close enough to death.

Bad Strategies:
  • Zero Deck Control: Yeah, she shuffles her deck constantly while La Paradoja Magnifica is out. That's not the concern here, the concern is keeping her deck in check while it's trashed. You might not think it at first, but Brain Burn and Suggestion, or any card that puts trashed cards on the bottom of her deck, are really, really good, since that prevents her returning the timeship to play with "All Together Now!" And as always, you want to dodge A Motley Crew or Raiding Party as often as possible.
  • Few Damage Dealers: For real, you need to make sure that every member of your team can contribute to attacking La Capitán and her crew at any given point in time. It's not impossible to solo crewmembers, although Siege-Breaker and Battle-Forged make it hard. The real issue is that you won't ever just have one target you need to kill, but several. I'm not saying you need giant indiscriminate attacks constantly (especially not if Maria Helena's Revenge is out), just that everyone can chip in with damage if they really need to.

Notable Cards
  • Battle-Forged: Attacking lowest health target for H? What? WHO LET YOU GET PAST QA TESTING? The good news is, Orinn here is completely okay with fighting environment cards as well as heroes. The bad news is if he gets any kills at all, he plays a villain card. While Battle-Forged is out, deciding what to do with him is a careful balancing act: you don't want those attacks aimed at your team (especially not if Final Breath or Captain's Orders is providing backup), but you also don't want him dunking environment targets for you. Try to leave any environment targets alive with enough health to eat a hit from him.
  • Plunder: Another big reason to keep La Capitán's crew in check is because quite a few of her cards ramp up in efficiency if she gets her crew in on it. Plunder is a prime example on that: on the Time Corsair side with enough crew out, it's like Temporal Thief but even meaner, and may result in resetting the game state so far back you may never get it back. Thankfully, this and many other one-shots can be lowered in scariness by destroying as many crewmembers as you can see.
  • The Amazing Mable: Melee immunity is surprisingly annoying, given that melee damage is among the most common in the game, but the real annoying part here is that Mable combines both hero ongoing/equipment destruction AND villain acceleration. Like, what? Did you and Battle-Forged bribe the hell out of the devs to get that into the game? Unlike her viking buddy, the procedure here is simple: DESTROY HER.

Last edited by Kalir; 05-09-2016 at 12:45 AM.
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