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  #31  
Old 04-09-2016, 10:36 PM
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RPG manuals, oh my. I've read supplemental material that as closet drama was better narrative than some fantasy novels I've read. Let me talk about one of my favorites.

Return to the Tomb of Horrors: a D&D 2nd ed. revised campaign that best epitomizes "amazing closet drama." It's a sequel of sorts to the infamous Tomb of Horrors written by D&D-creator Gary Gygax himself, the original being intended as the penultimate death trap dungeon that Gygax reportedly kept in his briefcase for players who said their characters were "overpowered."

Return the the Tomb wasn't a book, it was a box. Past the player aids and illustrations of various areas, the original Tomb of Horrors module, and illustration book; the actual adventure book, that thing that's usually a dozen pages of adventure module, is 160 pages. And this thing starts off as lethal and just gets harder. It's a joke to see the 3rd-edition Tomb of Horrors remake with its saving throws versus death when 2nd ed. would just flat out steal your PC's soul.

It's an epic that starts with pursuing a wizard, going past giants' lairs to hear rumor of a death cult. After trudging through a marsh while being terrorized by a vampire trio, going into the cult city of thousands, and infiltrating the cultist fortress; you are then made to attempt the original Tomb of Horrors, unchanged with one small exception.

One infamous part of the original Tomb of Horrors was its use of an Orb of Annihilation--a magical anomaly in D&D that basically, well, annihilated anything that went into it--made to look like a magically dark tunnel at the end of a corridor (said corridor filled with poison-spike pit traps). In Return, if you beat this dungeon, bring the dust of the dungeon boss to this black orb of oblivion and it suddenly becomes a teleporter.

At this point the campaign draws from a little bit of the Planescape campaign setting and the concept of a multiverse with different elemental planes of existence, for now the adventuring party goes through the ruins of a city filled with precipitous skywalks and platforms floating in a pocket dimension above the Negative Energy Plane--that is, the elemental plane of the dark energy that creates undead among other basically evil things. At this point the manual does describe the twenty dice of pure-evil-element damage you take a turn if you fall into that stuff.

After days of crawling through a nightmare that makes Dark Souls' New Londo Ruins seem like Sonic's Green Hill Zone, all the while being constantly pursued by a massively over-leveled and unstoppable amalgamation of tormented spirits, players can finally be introduced to the final dungeon.

Literally built in this infinite realm of negative energy sits the true Tomb of Horrors, where all along a lich (an enemy type first introduced into D&D from the first Tomb of Horrors) is using stolen souls of heroic beings from across the multiverse in an attempt to become one with this infinite negative energy plane. I think this is the rough equivalent of becoming not the ultimate evil but the power source for ultimate evils across all dimensions. Stakes are pretty high, especially since this soul-sucking lich only needs a small few more beings (like, say, half the player party) to ascend.

I don't know if this is any sense of being feasible to have an actual play of. I'd love to read an after-action report of such a feat. This isn't an adventure, this is a campaign that'd probably take months to play and requiring extremely skilled D&D players to have any chance of success. But wow, the narrative and art and--most especially--the inventiveness of ways this adventure just wants to fucking destroy any player characters is mind-boggling. If there was ever evidence that some game manuals are worth it just for reading, here it is.

Sadly, Return to the Tomb of Horrors is a relic of its time. The way D&D has emphasized some of its mechanics from 3rd edition onwards has really neutered any real way to reimplement such a brazen campaign. While mostly for the better, the d20 system just simply does not accommodate for some of the outright unfair ways Return to the Tomb of the Horrors wants to creatively kill its player characters. I also cannot see this module's dungeons working in a 5'x5' tactical grid combat system.

The premise of the Tomb of Horrors and this followup was that player ingenuity and ability to solve deadly puzzles trumped any amount of stat points and numerical bonuses on character sheets. That stuff doesn't fly as well post 3rd edition. When magic (metallic) items suddenly get to have a saving roll versus Rust Monsters, the face of death doesn't get to be as close to a party. To date I have yet to so see a D&D adventure--let alone a campaign--be so audacious and inventive with its fatalities.

EDIT: If there ever was a mood this entire epic set, it's a feeling one might get from this passage--a quote from a riddle given early in the first Tomb of Horrors.

Quote:
You’ve left and left and found my Tomb
and now your soul will die.
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  #32  
Old 04-25-2016, 05:36 PM
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I've been reading through the D&D Essentials books, most of which (alright, all of which) I picked up a few years ago when I had more disposable income. I really like them as products - even if the line was something only the market leader could swing. Single-column, large font, digest-sized paperbacks, with multiple rules redundancy across books. They look really nice - clean, where 4th Edition proper's books looked bland - and much easier to hand around the table and lend to players than other systems' singular phonebooks. And the Monster Vault belongs in the pantheon of all-time great game supplements.

I can't yet speak personally for much of the design of the line. The Dungeon Master's Guide is a excellent example of the type, the Rules Compendium is definitive, and see my statement above about the Monster Vault. I've heard conflicting reports about the various new classes in the Heroes books - though a lot of it comes from power users and theorycrafting players. When I get a table together, we'll see how it pans out, I suppose.
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  #33  
Old 04-25-2016, 05:54 PM
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Essentials classes are fine in actual play, like most things in 4E. Honestly better than 'most things' in 4E, as they're less likely to bog down a player with a lot of semi-redundant encounter and utility powers (at least the ones that aren't just 'Wizard, again' and 'Cleric, again').

Essentials feats can go die in a fire, but that also applies to all 4E feats.
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  #34  
Old 04-25-2016, 07:05 PM
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Feats are a weird design space in general. I don't mind 5E's so much, but the only time I've seen them really be compelling, from my limited exposure, is in Fantasy Craft.
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  #35  
Old 04-25-2016, 07:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Destil View Post
Essentials classes are fine in actual play, like most things in 4E. Honestly better than 'most things' in 4E, as they're less likely to bog down a player with a lot of semi-redundant encounter and utility powers (at least the ones that aren't just 'Wizard, again' and 'Cleric, again').

Essentials feats can go die in a fire, but that also applies to all 4E feats.
Destil probably remembers my teleporting pactblade warlock that was basically unstoppable whenever I'd roll something above a five on a hit roll.
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  #36  
Old 04-25-2016, 07:49 PM
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Essentials Pact-Blade warlock is one of the best designs in 4E, right next to PHB1 rogue.
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  #37  
Old 04-26-2016, 11:34 AM
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In other game reading news, I finished Strike! It's pretty much everything Kalir says it is, really. The central mechanic of letting a d6 unilaterally decide fate (with maybe one modifier if you're lucky) feels very limited and swingy at first, but thinking about it I realized that in most games I would be balancing numbers to about the same odds anyway, so this just streamlines things.

The tactical combat in Strike is really the basic essence of what D&D4E should have been. Basic abilities, lots of opportunities for reskinning, and not dozens of barely different ways of doing the same thing over and over. No need for a computer program to build your character and line up all your abilities and mods for you. It's beautiful, really. Strike is definitely going on the short list of games I want to play some day.


Let me know if you ever plan on running a game of it. I'm running one that's FTL flavored and going to start running another soon, but I have yet to actually pick up and play a character.
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  #38  
Old 04-26-2016, 11:49 AM
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Feats are a weird design space in general. I don't mind 5E's so much, but the only time I've seen them really be compelling, from my limited exposure, is in Fantasy Craft.
5e's feats are also a really weird design space, because depending on class they're either essential numbers fixes that weren't baked into the class because of preconceived design notions from old-school players (Fighters, Rogues)...

... Or they're totally redundant and help you pad out edge cases that you probably don't actually really care about anyway (spellcasters).

It's just a different weird design space.
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  #39  
Old 04-26-2016, 12:10 PM
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I don't disagree with you on that, but could you elaborate a little more?

(I also like how there's some feats there that seem clearly intended for players whose GMs won't allow multiclassing for whatever reason.)
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  #40  
Old 04-26-2016, 12:41 PM
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I don't disagree with you on that, but could you elaborate a little more?

(I also like how there's some feats there that seem clearly intended for players whose GMs won't allow multiclassing for whatever reason.)
The difference between a Fighter or Rogue (or Ranger, really) that takes their appropriate combat feat (Dual Wielder, Great Weapon Master, Sentinel, or Sharpshooter) and one that doesn't is gigantic. Great Weapon Master and Sharpshooter are especially bad, since -5 hit for +10 damage is game-changing given the way monster AC and HP tends to work. Especially once you introduce magical weapons, reliable advantage, and +dX hit bonuses. (Proficiency dice Fighters, Bardic Inspiration) These feats are straight up "numbers fixes" - either the class and monster design assumes you have them, or they put you so far ahead that not taking them is indefensible.

The difference between a spellcaster who takes a caster combat feat (Elemental Adept or Spell Sniper) and one that doesn't is negligible. Provided they jack their spell save DC as high as possible as quickly as possible, a spellcaster can take whatever feats or attribute advances they like with zero impact on their battle effectiveness, positive or negative.

While I can't speak to the design ethos behind 5e... Based on the reactions I've observed, this, in effect, mostly caters to preconceived notions about how classes should work. "Martial" classes should be "simple", with few options or special rules and gameplay that mostly revolves around simple rolls to stick weapons into monsters and ablate their HP. "Caster" classes should be "complex", with a varied palette of options that allow different solutions to different problems, limited only by per-day resource constraints. And these "shoulds" are because that's how pre-4e editions of D&D did it.

5e's Feats exist to give players that want to disrupt that norm the ability to do so by adding mechanical complexity to their "martial" characters, but:

- They walk an extremely fine line, and go out of their way to avoid adding "too much" complexity, for an awfully arbitrary definition of "too much"
- They compete with the same advancement resources "martial" characters would use to pursue non-combat proficiency or defend against casters' palette of options. (Other Feats, Attribute Increases)
- They're supposedly optional, meaning that the game is suggesting that you punish martial characters by denying them essential features
- There are no feats to simplify caster classes, leaving players who want to do magic but don't want to deal with the wildly varying power of different spell choices out in the cold
- They're super-weird for "half-martial" classes (Ranger, Paladin) that get some of that caster mechanical complexity, caster defense, and option palette, through features and spell list, but not all of it... And lack the extra advancement resources the martial classes get to compensate.
- They're even more super-weird for the "3/4-martial" classes (Barbarian, Monk), which "bake in" some caster flexibility, but only some, while still removing the extra advancement resources.

So they're weird in the opposite direction from 4e's feats. 4e's feats felt completely unnecessary. They were there because the designers were afraid that not having "feats" would alienate 3e fans, and didn't realize that everything else about the game already meant 3e fans had tuned out. 5e's feats are presented as optional but are, really, core to the design of most of the available classes.
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  #41  
Old 04-26-2016, 02:24 PM
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So, I also spend a lot of time reading RPG manuals and supplements, because I dabble in freelance work (more when I was a college student), because I've learned a lot of cross-applicable skills and ideas from doing so, and because I'm that weird player who reads the rulebook cover to cover for every game I'm playing in, much less those I'm running.

Most recently, I've spent a ton of time reading all three FFG Star Wars core rulebooks, because I got Age of Rebellion for Christmas and decided I wanted to run it. In addition to being gorgeously-designed books, they do a great job of presenting what are, ultimately, very cutting edge concepts in a way that's accessible and palatable for groups of new players.

The custom dice and their mechanics package up concepts like "success at a cost" or "failure with benefits" smoothly and transparently. It's not always easy, in the heat of the moment, to bring them into play, but the fact that they're always there as prompts helps steer away from "you fail and nothing happens" or "you succeed and win".

The GM chapters are also excellent, packed with good, practical advice. They include run-downs of problems you're likely to encounter at the table, complete with solutions that are practical and not "you're the GM, you win". There's some good advice on using the game's mechanics in play and making your game feel like Star Wars.

Characters are lightly class-based, and do a great job of interacting with other rules to give practically any Star Wars-y concept useful ways to be good at things and contribute in a variety of situations. There's a slight investment problem, with a single advancement resource invested into both skill and class advancement, and class advancement is way more interesting than skill advancement. The dice mechanics do a good job of making the characters relatively omni-competent and really outstanding in their areas of focus, making this the first Star Wars RPG that lets you play Star Wars out the gate.

The problems start with the setting chapters. These books largely predate the EU purge, so there's considerable fluffing of EU fans, including long, lovingly-crafted passages about the stupidest parts of continuity. Fortunately, there's also plenty of neat ideas, or things presented vaguely enough that they serve as good inspiration. And the absolute stupidest parts of EU continuity - like super-unvincible Star Destroyers - are utterly ignored.

The sample NPCs are also generally pretty awful. The NPC advice is actually pretty good, but the samples mostly don't follow it, creating opposition that the game claims is mild but which is really overwhelmingly spicy. And that's built on by the back-of-the-book introductory adventures, which present situations that are overwhelmingly nasty and often revert to the modes of play endorsed by prior Star Wars RPGs - Traveller-lite or punishingly "realistic" gritty military play, rather than space fantasy high adventure.

Of the three core rulebooks, you can really tell that Force and Destiny was produced after the Disney take-over. It's got a much better section in the GM chapter about making continuity work for you and treating it as a loosely-coupled mythology rather than iron-clad fact. It's got a great roll-your-own Imperial Inquisitor system, and advice on using it. And while a lot of the terrible sample NPCs are reprinted, others are actually built following the guidelines, and are quite usable. This all smells like a licensor paying attention to the quality of the product.

All three books also do a pretty good job of supplementing each other, despite repeated information. Edge of the Empire really nails the "scum and villainy" style, Age of Rebellion the "plucky freedom fighter", and Force and Destiny the "epic, grand magic".
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  #42  
Old 04-27-2016, 06:11 PM
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I've been trying to decide whether I want to grab Age of Rebellion, as it's the only one of the trio I don't have. I'm not really big on the "plucky freedom fighter" bit though, while I have played the hell out of shady smugglers before and always liked the idea of playing someone who is sensitive to the force but not really a jedi.

And I would gladly customize the hell out of lightsaber.

Basically I want to play tabletop KotOR.

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Let me know if you ever plan on running a game of it. I'm running one that's FTL flavored and going to start running another soon, but I have yet to actually pick up and play a character.
Man, don't I wish. I'm having trouble making the time to work on the PTU game I'm going to run in a few weeks... wait, I said character creation is this weekend? Hoo boy....

I should remember to talk about Act Ten this weekend. It's a light, breezy read for a light, breezy game, but some of the bits in it have divided my opinion.
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  #43  
Old 04-27-2016, 07:18 PM
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I've been trying to decide whether I want to grab Age of Rebellion, as it's the only one of the trio I don't have. I'm not really big on the "plucky freedom fighter" bit though, while I have played the hell out of shady smugglers before and always liked the idea of playing someone who is sensitive to the force but not really a jedi.

And I would gladly customize the hell out of lightsaber.
Well then Force and Destiny has what you need.

Age is definitely heavily focused on Rebel fighters operating with the framework of the Rebellion. It has a couple pages on combining Duty (Age's group mechanic) with Obligation that work out pretty well. I'm running the combo by basically aiming for the Rebels TV series.

Age also has some nice careers, a universal tree for "combating" up any character, and a bunch of maneuvers that spruce up capital ship combat a bit.

But if you're not into plucky freedom fighters, you're not missing anything giving it a pass.
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  #44  
Old 05-01-2016, 05:06 PM
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Oh no, good character options! My greatest weakness! Though I guess if I don't want to play Age of Rebellion, having Rebel-oriented character options won't be a huge help....

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I should remember to talk about Act Ten this weekend. It's a light, breezy read for a light, breezy game, but some of the bits in it have divided my opinion.
Let me get this out of the way first of all: Act Ten is a rather inoffensive game for the most part. Basic mechanic is to roll 1d10, add the relevant stat and skill, and compare it to a target number. It mixes this up by giving you fractional XP for, by default, every successful roll. My first thought was to compare it unfavorably to Dungeon World giving you XP for failing instead and how that takes the sting out of a bum roll.

There's three things Act Ten does that make that fractional XP gain less silly to me: first, it suggests you go ahead and houserule that however you like. (The book in general is pretty good about suggesting little tweaks you might like to make to the rules, as befits a system that's going for that Savage Worlds-style "One system for every game you could want to play (and by the way, buy these fifty other splatbooks)" niche.)

Second, fractional XP can also be spent on what the game calls "tuning," specializations for your skills, so that you can put off a big development for a little while in order for a good bonus right now. Options are good!

Thirdly, what really sold me on it is something they pointed out in the GM's section: this method means that if the GM wants to control the PC's growth he has to be careful that he only has them roll when it's important. It admittedly helps that the example of a superfluous roll in the book is having a PC roll just to open a regular door, when that exact thing in another book's introduction irritated me so much it convinced me not to back a kickstarter.

Honestly, while it's a kind of unorthodox, maybe over-complicated way to run what is essentially a point buy character build system, it does seem like it could be a lot of fun. So why did I say in my last post that I'm of two minds about the game? Let me quote you a short passage that I think exemplifies my issues with it:

Quote:
INSTANT SUCCESS/FAILURE
If the target number, plus five is either too high or low versus Actors roll, plus five (in place of die roll), just assume the task is passed or failed. This speeds up game play where rolls that don't need an OFN are used.
In other words, if the degree of success isn't important and the odds are more than fifty percent in favor of one side that side automatically wins without anyone rolling. It took me about three tries to figure that out, thanks to the combination of jargon and slightly vague writing. I hate to judge a game based on a few typos, some ambiguous wording, or a bit of jargon, but this passage is actually pretty light on all three compared to the rest of the book. There's an editor credited, but this book sorely needed a proofreader and someone to tell the writer that he was making dire overuse of three letter abbreviations.

The other thing that really confuses me? There's no items or equipment in the core rules, except for a single page in one chapter that's just a sample from their first splatbook. Judging by the examples, items shouldn't be too hard to make up on your own, but it just seems so weird that they pull them completely out of the core rules like that.

All in all, it's a great effort, but this book could have really used a little bit more time in the oven.
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  #45  
Old 05-06-2016, 10:43 AM
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Just having finished Horse-lords of Rohan is a good excuse to talk about The One Ring RPG!

I'll begin with saying that this is the best setting book in the line by a mile. The Heart of the Wild and Rivendell were good, but this book's great. They advance the timeline slightly from the default "5 years after the Hobbit" start date of the other material, setting the book just after Theoden's father Thengel takes the throne. The result is a land scattered with the ruins of fallen kingdoms, a new king coming to grips with the consequences of his father's corrupt reign, riven by tribal animosity, and menaced by the shadow of the Dark Lord.

The whole of the One Ring line treads very cautiously with respect to canon, leveraging the ample gaps in Tolkien's writing to build a rather compelling setting of ancient mysteries, shadowy evil, and scattered tribes and kingdoms struggling against the darkness. Sometimes that goes better than others. In Rohan, the section on dealing with Ents and Hobbits is inspired (maybe they don't notice them? Or think they're beardless dwarves and don't want to embarrass them? Or maybe Merry and Pippin just flagrantly lied!), while the section on Saruman wobbles back and forth between lecturing the GM on the importance of strictly adhering to canon always and presenting actually rather fun alternatives for the White Wizard.

The One Ring's mechanics are straightforward and well-assembled, at least as of the revised single hardcover rulebook. Combat, journeys, and social encounters are modeled using a common skeleton, with differences in structure making each distinct. There's a lot of strong guidance for the GM, which helps to simplify the process of running the game. For example, enemies in combat explicitly divide evenly between player characters, save those who have taken a "Rear" stance.

Characters are kind of class-based, created from a "Heroic Culture" that pre-sets most elements of the character, including skills, weapons, a unique ability, and development opportunities. However, these are more focused on recreating the feel of a culture than a game role, making them slightly awkward. Plus, Hobbits are virtually unstoppable murder machines. Characters advance by developing skills, or by increasing their "Wisdom" or "Valor", which confer additional abilities or improved gear, respectively, as they increase.

Characters also have "traits", one-word descriptive phrases indicating special knowledge or ability. These can be freely used in a variety of ways - characters can automatically succeed at skill rolls, make a skill roll in a circumstance they normally couldn't, or earn advancement resources.

The game's dice mechanic is also pretty clever. Rolls are a custom d12 plus a number of d6s determined by skill. The d12 is labeled 1-10, with the other faces bearing a "G" rune (automatic success), and an Eye of Sauron (result of 0, plus extra consequences on failure). Rolling 6s on the d6s increases the "quality" of success, while certain conditions cause the 1-3 results to count as 0s. Rolls are normally made against a target of 14, and characters can spend "Hope" to add their attribute rating to the result. As a result, rolls are relatively predictable and quick to tally - stop counting when you're over 14, note any 6s.

While the line is reasonably complete, there's an upcoming book on Erebor, the Lonely Mountain, that I'm really looking forward to, and the developers have indicated that they want to do books on the Shire and Bree, and the kingdoms of Dale and Gondor.
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Old 05-07-2016, 06:27 PM
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So I started a Dungeon World campaign this past week and since my players decided they wanted a setting with a jungle the size of an ocean, I decided to pick up The Perilous Wilds supplement. It's really good, with modified moves for perilous journeys and followers, along with fantastic map making instructions and amazing random tables. Oh my god these random tables. I would recommend them to any GM, really, running any fantasy game. Just now, for fun, I rolled on them a few times and already got a ton of fantastic ideas for NPCs, monsters and treasure. They're really great.
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  #47  
Old 05-07-2016, 06:56 PM
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Everything about this new Pathfinder class from Ultimate Intrigue is amazing.

Mainly that it's an official first party fantasy RPG type thing which is unabashedly just about being a full on straight up costume-and-alter-ego superhero. I mean, I didn't know I had any desire to take on orcs and dragons and such with a bard, cleric, a wizard, and Spiderman, but, now that I see rules for it hell yes that's appealing.
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  #48  
Old 05-07-2016, 07:59 PM
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Everything about this new Pathfinder class from Ultimate Intrigue is amazing.

Mainly that it's an official first party fantasy RPG type thing which is unabashedly just about being a full on straight up costume-and-alter-ego superhero. I mean, I didn't know I had any desire to take on orcs and dragons and such with a bard, cleric, a wizard, and Spiderman, but, now that I see rules for it hell yes that's appealing.
Looks like you can also be a magical girl. Complete with your very own Kyubey!
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  #49  
Old 05-08-2016, 08:01 PM
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I want to play Ye Olde Justice League now. Who is running this?
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Old 05-08-2016, 11:03 PM
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I'm already GMing 2 other PF games or I'd totally volunteer.
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  #51  
Old 05-22-2016, 02:35 PM
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Mage: the Awakening 2nd edition is still a World Chronicles of Darkness game.

That said it's probably the best of the second edition CroD games so far. It's not aggressively gloomy, despite being about people who discover magic by way of finding that the entire world is a prison and a Lie, and they can't share what they know with anyone else without breaking down their minds. And it offers the most intelligible explanation of the elements of the supernatural world despite having more to cover and going out of its way to make it clear that the world is a complicated messy place that has no clean lines or easy answers.

Rules presentation is also top-notch. The World Chronicles of Darkness core is still creaky and not entirely sure what it wants to be or do, but a lot of the rougher edges are cleaned up or at least tidied away. And the "You're a wizard, Harry" bits are marvelous and well put-together. The sample spells have a few problems, but the guidelines for making up your own are clear and concise, and the system does a great job of reinforcing the notion that magic is simple and safe or grand and dangerous - to you and everyone in your neighborhood.

The five sample settings are a mixed bag. Three are great, one is okay, and Tokyo is terrible. The last was sadly predictable, as someone decided they'd do a Tokyo setting for every CroD game, and they've all been awful.

If you want a game about wizarding in the modern world and are comfortable making shit up inside a well-established rules framework, this is definitely the best choice.

I was tempted to do world chronicle everywhere I used the word in this post, but decided it would be too hard to read.
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Old 05-23-2016, 12:36 PM
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Reminds me that one of these days I really want to get half a bottle of Weller into the branding mastermind who got both Charnel Houses of Europe and Demon Hunter X on White Wolf's publishing slate.
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Old 06-14-2016, 05:26 PM
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I've been reading Burning Wheel, but I think I just can't get through the whole thing without actually playing some with an experienced GM at the wheel. I feel safe in saying that it is by far the most complicated RPG I've ever actually wanted to play, but maybe it's easier to understand with some actual experience....
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Old 06-14-2016, 05:31 PM
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If someone on this forum wants to run Burning Wheel, I would be totally down to play.
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Old 06-14-2016, 08:42 PM
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If anyone here ever decides to do Microscope please let me know...
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Old 06-14-2016, 08:50 PM
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I would love to play Microscope but am not sure how you'd do it online. A Google Doc might work, I guess.
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Old 06-14-2016, 08:56 PM
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Quote:
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I would love to play Microscope but am not sure how you'd do it online. A Google Doc might work, I guess.
an order for players and then building on the last posts?
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Old 06-14-2016, 09:01 PM
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If you're talking about doing it play-by-post, that wouldn't work. You need to be able to add to any part of the timeline at any time and be aware of their relationship to one another (what's the order of Periods, which Events are in which Periods, which scenes are in which events, etc.). I suppose you could just copy past the entire timeline in each post, but that might be a bit awkward. Also, acting out scenes would be reaaaaalllly slow in play-by-post.
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Old 06-14-2016, 09:09 PM
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Quote:
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If you're talking about doing it play-by-post, that wouldn't work. You need to be able to add to any part of the timeline at any time and be aware of their relationship to one another (what's the order of Periods, which Events are in which Periods, which scenes are in which events, etc.). I suppose you could just copy past the entire timeline in each post, but that might be a bit awkward. Also, acting out scenes would be reaaaaalllly slow in play-by-post.
I dont see a rush when it comes to doing it. But you have a point about placing and such.
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Old 06-14-2016, 09:47 PM
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It's not so much the time, just that I think it would be tough keeping up the rhythm and interest in the game.
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