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  #31  
Old 01-12-2017, 10:22 AM
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I heat the pan to boiling over and then turn off the heat, letting the trapped steam cook the rice, and it comes out pretty fluffy from top to bottom, in my experience.
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  #32  
Old 01-12-2017, 10:36 AM
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Yeah, for generic long-grain white rice one cup dry rice (well, rinsed) + two cups of water plus the heat to boiling then turn heat very low/off always worked fine. Though an actual rice cooker does work better, yeah.
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  #33  
Old 01-12-2017, 11:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyblue View Post
Yeah, for generic long-grain white rice one cup dry rice (well, rinsed) + two cups of water plus the heat to boiling then turn heat very low/off always worked fine.
I always just make my rice on the stovetop, using this precise method/ratio (although I usually make basmati, not white). I have a rice cooker, but I never use it anymore, because I find the stovetop quicker and easier, and I've never noticed much of a texture difference, or the unevenness that some of you are describing.
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  #34  
Old 01-12-2017, 12:12 PM
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The crusty bottom for rice is actually a thing we do here, called "tahdig" (lit. bottom pot) and it's a feature of the "kateh" style of rice we cook. Alternatively, in non-kateh style (I'm pretty sure) you can oil the bottom of the pot and add thin bread (we use lavash for this) or thinly sliced potatoes.

Of course, we also add a good amount of salt and butter to it before it's on the stove, and there's some differences in how we cook it, so something to keep in mind I guess.
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  #35  
Old 01-12-2017, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by WisteriaHysteria View Post
Whether or not you exercise moderation makes you fat. I've been skinny all my life. I've also eaten rice approximately 85% of the days I've been alive. Your total caloric intake is what makes you fat.
please understand my scott pilgrim joke from 6 years ago
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  #36  
Old 01-12-2017, 01:26 PM
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Oops. My only retained memories of Scott Pilgrim are almost exclusively limited to the game's amazing soundtrack.

I'm trying to understand/imagine a world where people consciously try to avoid the brown crispy at the bottom, and I just can't. That's the dope shit me and my kin fought over at the dinner table.
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  #37  
Old 01-31-2017, 08:01 PM
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Yeah, this first experiment was more of a 'let's do it strictly by the book' endeavor. I think the next one will be 'let's use the same inputs for all methods and compare their efficacies'.

For reference, here is the table for rice:water ratios the Instant Pot manual lists

Basmati - 1.0 : 1.5
Brown - 1.0 : 1.25
Jasmine - 1.0 : 1.0
White - 1.0 : 1.5
Wild - 1.0 : 3.0

So much for going by the book!
Turns out the secret to Instant Pot rice cooking is to measure by mass, not volume. Which makes sense, except they TELL YOU TO USE THEIR INCLUDED CUP TO MEASURE ==>> VOLUMETRIC MEASURE arghle.

Anyways, my preferred unit of rice is right at about 3/4 cup or 120g, so it's pretty easy to get the right amount of water now. The Rice option gives you 12 minutes of active pressure time, which I think is a little too much. I cut the heat with about 2 minutes left, and vented the pressure a little before the natural cooling cutoff, and it was pretty good.
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  #38  
Old 02-21-2017, 08:43 PM
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so I identified a source of the delicious purple multi-grain rice in my grocery store.

Does cooking rice make anyone else's mouth water?
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  #39  
Old 02-23-2017, 08:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady View Post
so I identified a source of the delicious purple multi-grain rice in my grocery store.

Does cooking rice make anyone else's mouth water?
Basmati, on account of the furious spice aroma.
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  #40  
Old 02-23-2017, 08:43 AM
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Basmati rice is the thing to eat with Texas-style chili.
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  #41  
Old 02-23-2017, 12:21 PM
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Red-hot Texas-style chili?
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  #42  
Old 02-23-2017, 01:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Raider Dr. Jones View Post
Basmati rice is the thing to eat with Texas-style chili.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Büge View Post
Red-hot Texas-style chili?
Never considered this combo, but now I have to try it.
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  #43  
Old 02-23-2017, 02:08 PM
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  #44  
Old 02-23-2017, 06:31 PM
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At that point, aren't you just eating American-ized curry?
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  #45  
Old 02-23-2017, 07:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyblue View Post
At that point, aren't you just eating American-ized curry?
exactly!

(well not exactly, you don't put veggies or beans in Texas chili, but more or less)
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  #46  
Old 02-24-2017, 04:05 PM
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Jasmine rice is what you go for when you wanna do fried rice or one of those delicious heathen chilis with pork shoulder and mango
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  #47  
Old 02-24-2017, 04:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muteKi View Post
Jasmine rice is what you go for when you wanna do fried rice
Naw, you can make fried rice with any rice, you just have to treat it differently. Japanese make fried rice with sticky short grain; it's less sauce based and more seasoning/spices and it's pretty great. You can use Chinese long grain too, you just have to make it 12-24 hours earlier or put it in the fridge to pull the H2O out.

Edit: But yeah, Jasmine makes the process easier for lots of fried rice varieties.

Last edited by WisteriaHysteria; 02-24-2017 at 04:23 PM.
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  #48  
Old 02-24-2017, 06:39 PM
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I use basmati all day erry day for all my non-pasta bachelor food needs, since it tastes great, and has excellent performance charactistics.

For my fried rice, I use my stir-fry sauce without stock and thickener, with extra soy and chili sauce. Are there any other spices I should try adding to it?
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  #49  
Old 02-24-2017, 08:12 PM
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Lemon juice actually works really well in fried rice I discovered on accident. So does bacon grease. Oyster sauce is also a must if you're making it Chinese-ish. The aroma it adds is a killer.
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