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  #15721  
Old 08-12-2017, 12:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Kirin View Post
I still haven't managed to scare up a watchable sub of Lupin III: Goemon's Blood Spray.
Thank you, and god damn you for reminding me this was a thing that existed. I've had a copy of it for a while and decided to sit down and watch after reading your post. Aaaaaand urggggg.

It was actually a really good movie, but a lot like Jigen's Gravestone, it has some problems that kept me from enjoying it to the fullest. Namely, holy cow is it violent. This is the most violent Lupin III has ever been. Be prepared to watch Jigen dismember a lot of people. It's almost delightful in a campy, grindhouse manner. But during the final duel, it gets to be too much for even me and I got a little nauseous, what with Jigen getting the flesh graphically rendered from his body in slow motion. If that doesn't sound like a good time to you, just skip from precisely 44:45-47:15.

That said, everything sans that timestamp was a delight. The scenario is pretty much "What if Jaws was a dual axe wielding lumberjack" that's on the hunt for Lupin & friends. It appears to take place not long after Jigen's Gravestone, so it's really nice to see Lupin & gang in a historical setting again where he works best. The fights are real (for lack of a better word) visceral - every blunt blow has a real weight behind it, and every slice sounds and looks like razors slicing through butter. The characters are in prime form, and everything is gorgeous. There's a scene where Lupin, Jigen, and Fujiko are hanging out getting wasted on booze and weed after a successful heist that was just... fun. I wish Takeshi Koike would make a TV show instead of these short films. I really like his take on Lupin III, but being on TV would probably do his stuff a lot of good since it would act as a natural dampener on some of his wilder impulses. A Woman Named Fujiko Mine was in a perfect place for tone. Jigen's Gravestone & Goemon's Blood steps over the line of good taste a few times too many.

The fansubs I watched were especially machine-y, but they were watchable and mostly just very awkward from a grammar standpoint.

I'll be happy when the new French TV show comes out. I've missed Lupin, and after this film, I'll be looking forwards to more lighthearted adventures again.
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  #15722  
Old 08-12-2017, 06:35 AM
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Yeah that last fight made me physically ill. Not fun to watch at all.
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  #15723  
Old 08-12-2017, 12:42 PM
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I have a copy where I'm pretty sure the subs are machine-translated from Russian, and I gave up watching it after a few minutes. I suppose I could just power through, but ugh.
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  #15724  
Old 08-12-2017, 08:56 PM
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Aaaand finished the Last Exile sequel.

Hmm. I think I get what Luscinia was going for; namely, giving the world an enemy to unite against, while also destroying the Grand Exile so that it couldn't be used for (further) destruction. And also freeing the Augusta from its weight, I suppose.

I do find it funny how Fam originally didn't even rank at the second Grand Race, only getting bumped up to third after Dio was kicked. I also really liked how the Second Adjournment episode, where they recapped the original Last Exile, used the original OP.

I think the main thing, though, is that a lot of the show kind of relies on the viewer having seen the original, with things like Vincent's introduction and Sophia's appearance and all that. The main characters don't know who these folks are; the show treats it as some huge deal though. Alvis is also by-and-large just a passive character here -- practically does less than Teddy -- and yet you can tell she's treated with a good bit of importance (the one thing that only she could do, guide the Grand Exile infiltration team to the Augusta, was very quickly usurped by Giselle). And sure, it is a sequel, so it's not like it's really a problem or anything. It just sort of...loses something, I think, when it can't stand alone as its own tale without needing those prior associations. I dunno, maybe I'm just weird though.


Overall, I'd say it's definitely a good follow-up to the original.
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  #15725  
Old 08-13-2017, 10:43 PM
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I drove out to watch In This Corner of the World earlier today in Berkeley. And hours later I'm laying in bed still thinking about it and tearing up. I'll have more to say about it later when I'm rested and composed, but it was a really magnificent film. It's coming to a lot more theaters next weekend, and I emplore everyone to go watch it. The Funimation website linked earlier didn't have anything but US listings but I've been reassured by some friends that it'll be playing in Canada as well.
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  #15726  
Old 08-14-2017, 04:00 PM
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Hmm, checked again and it's still not getting closer to me than the other side of the state, unfortunately.
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  #15727  
Old 08-14-2017, 09:43 PM
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So, catching up on things slowly, I just watched the first episode of The Reflection. It's... different. Extremely committed to this low-fi indie comic aesthetic, from a very flat animation style to a lot of long silent pauses. The pacing and acting is just kind of weird. The actual plot so far is your bog standard "bunch of random people got weird powers for mysterious reasons, now some are a criminal/terrorist organization and others are working with govt secret ops". Also one main character is straight-up Sky High from Tiger & Bunny, only named I-Guy (??) and I think he can also control ad displays around him for some reason (???). But the style is intriguing enough that I'll try a bit more at least.

(And then Stan Lee voices the next episode blurb and oh my god it's so corny.)
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  #15728  
Old Yesterday, 12:49 AM
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hmm

having only seen two episodes so far

i think i like this Restaurant to Another World show
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  #15729  
Old Yesterday, 01:11 AM
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OK. In This Corner of the World. I stayed up all night thinking about it. I apologize in advance because I'm going to ramble for a bit. More than usual, in all likelihood.

I'm not sure everyone will get what I got out of the film, but at the very least, it's a wondrous case study of wartime Japan and the tenacity of the human spirit in the face of trials and tribulations. It's also got a message that's more relevant now then ever, and when you hear people making calls to/justifications of violence and rattling sabers, it's good to remember films like this.

Getting it out of the way early, you will inevitably make or hear comparisons to Grave of the Fireflies, and it's nowhere near the dark and dismal experience that was. In This Corner finds a way to be emotional impact without resorting to depicting too much violence. And while Grave of the Fireflies is an important instructive film to portray the loss and cruelty of war, it's not balanced in the same way In This Corner is, with its fundamentally positive outlook on the human spirit.

The film is told through the perspective of its main protagonist, Suzu. We watch her grow up from being a little kid, and trek her life through the end of the War as an adult. As a kid she grows up on the outskirts of Hiroshima, and when she gets married, she joins her husband's family in the nearby naval town of Kure. As time passes, each new scene is given a month and year of the Imperial Calendar (so like, June of Showa 15, and translated into the Gregorian on screen for its international audience), which very effectively leads to an escalating sense of dread as time marches towards August 6th of 1945. In fact, every time the date is given not just a month and year, but a day too, a pit opened up in my stomach. Because even if you didn't know Japanese history like the back of your hand, you could still intuit that, if the day was marked, then it was likely a day of historical significance for that area, and not for positive reasons.

And despite that pervasive sense of dread, the film is mostly an upbeat and positive one. Suzu is a beacon of good will and positivity. In the face of food shortages, she picks wild herbs and researches feudal warfare cooking techniques to make the most of dwindling rations. When some of her in-laws greet her with hostility, she disarms them with her cheeriness and effervescent good will. When tasks seem difficult or impossible for her petite frame, she does her best, doesn't complain, and seems to tackle them through sheer willpower. The film is peppered with jokes and humorous situations. One time when things seem extremely dire for Suzu when the military police catch her idly sketching the port for fun and accuse her of espionage her family breaks out laughing at the sheer idiocy of the situation rather than get stressed or upset, and it's all thanks to Suzu's influence herself.

Another thing that helps the film stay positive in the light of very serious subject matters, is how it's presented. The entire film has a dreamlike quality to it, and that's because we're seeing Suzu's perspective. And Suzu lives her life in a way that's somewhat detached from reality. She gets accused of being an airhead, and the psychology of her character is incredibly complicated (I'll address that later) but the outcome for the film is that we see very surrealistic moments superimposed upon reality, where as a viewer we can't be entirely sure if we're seeing something that happened, or some kind of day dream of her's that she's confused with reality. And it's this half-awake dreamlike state gives the film a floaty, pleasant aura for most of the film. And this convergence of reality and dream is reinforced by the film changing its animation style on occasion. Because Suzu at her heart, is an artist who loves to paint, and sees the world through pastels, graphite, and oil splotches. (I'm told this varying art style is even more pronounced in the manga.) But every moment of the film is beautiful to behold. MAPPA really outdid themselves here.

And at other times, the daydreams work in reverse. Perhaps because so much of the film is happy and positive, the parts where reality rushes in and is impossible to ignore makes those scenes all the more impactful in contrast. And during some of the most surreal moments, when you're trying to figure out what's happening but then it finally hits you, those moments too are much more affecting than if everything was literal and blunt like in the way Grave of the Fireflies was with the suffering of its characters. So as a warning to those going to watch it, make sure to see it in the daytime, or on a weekend when you can better absorb an emotional gut punch or two, because there are moments where the film is absolutely emotionally affecting. I feel affecting in a good way, but certainly something you shouldn't walk into lightly. I told one friend who planned to maybe see it on her birthday "maybe wait an extra day..." But again, I still consider the overriding tone of the movie upbeat and positive. That's probably why I found it so affecting too, because in contrast with Grave of the Fireflies - which I'll probably never watch again and defensively tried to put it out of mind as soon as I could, this film balanced things out so I wanted to think about it more and I'll happily rewatch it again.

There's a lot of subtle and not-so-subtle symbolism going on in the film, so you really have to be engaged as a viewer to catch everything going on, but I still think it would mostly work even if you watched it from a less engaged perspective. In This Corner of the World was a 2+ hour film, so make sure you use the restroom first. I ended up watching the dub, but would have preferred the sub. It seems like, for all the theaters I checked, the first showing in the early afternoons are all dub-viewings, and all the later ones are subs. The dub itself wasn't bad and worked ok, but a lot of the time it didn't sound great. Like the voice actors were pacing their speech patterns on the Japanese but it wasn't meshing well with the script or intonations in English. I was impressed however that, at least the pronunciations of Japanese words were decent to good for a dub, and everything worked well enough that it wasn't distracting or anything so it's not a bad way to see the movie at all. I'll be interested in seeing it subbed next weekend for contrast.

Onto some spoiler discussions:

I really, really liked Suzu as a character, and it was a lot of fun trying to figure her out and empathize with her, as she's incredibly layered and fascinating as a character.
In This Corner never overtly tells the audience its themes and you have to figure things out. So with Suzu, you kind of spend the entire film trying to figure out just what her deal is. A lot of her daydreaming isn't necessarily because she's inherently air-headed, but for her, it's also a kind of coping mechanism. In the very beginning of the film, this idea is established when she recounts a story about being abducted as a child, but to her it was a fanciful tale of spending an afternoon with a spooky but endearing cartoon monster. And while, in one of her darker moments she hates herself for 'always running away' from reality/her problems, functionally this coping mechanism of hers lets her see the happy and positive and downright wondrous from her life when it's either mundane and "ordinary", or painful and trying.

But a lot of the time, we're not really sure if this happiness is genuine or just a stoic facade. We can be assured a lot of the time it is by the end of the film, but there are moments where she is aloof or standoffish or acts downright depressed, because despite her lack of protestations, she's often not very happy with her life circumstances. Suzu gets married off at a late age (for the time - 19) to another family, and the events surrounding it are complicated. One of her extended family members imply that she doesn't have to go through with it, but watching the movie it increasingly feels like a forced arranged marriage. She's never met her husband/doesn't even know her new family name on the day of her wedding, and it's implied that she's being married off for financial reasons to help her family (one less mouth to feed; perhaps even a reverse dowry). And her new family (she moves into her husband's parents home, living in a generational house) constantly notes that she was 'forced' to marry. And the lack of intimacy and kindness she shows her husband is something that stands as a polar opposite to the entirety of her being and personality. And we find out later that she spent years and years loving someone else and waited for them to rescue her to no avail.

And as we go through the film, it's never stated as much, but as a viewer we get the feeling that this isn't because she resents her husband/being married off. Not entirely at least. He's an incredibly decent and kind man, and him and her new family more or less welcomes her into the fold in a way that the film reminds us is uncommon in Japanese society - "daughter-in-laws are still strangers" one person remarks reminding modern audiences of the complexities of Japanese in/out-groups. What's really going on is, we come to realize that Suzu has an incredibly low estimation of herself and self-esteem issues. Her frustration with her husband is then because she doesn't understand why he treats her so well. And while the answer to that is incredibly complicated (and also the big plot twist at the end of the movie) it's also something that is self-evident to everyone around her. She's a good person, and she shows people unconditional warmth and generosity, and they reward her in turn. Everyone she comes in contact with grows to appreciate and love her, and at some point in the movie, they all attempt to tell her in their own roundabout ways that she should be more confident in herself or that they genuinely appreciate and love her for who she is.

And that links up with one of the best themes of the movie. All throughout the film, we see Suzu give small acts of kindness to friends and strangers alike, and without fail, every time in the movie we see that even if Suzu thought nothing of it, it ended up having a profound impact on others, and helped make them happier and better people. One time as a child, she dreamt a zashiki warashi descended from the ceiling of her grandmother's house to eat her leftover watermelon rinds. Despite being told it wasn't real, she insisted on being able to both leave out fresh slices of watermelon for the spirit, as well as leaving her brand new kimono for the raggedy spirit to change into. And may years later, when she's lost in a bad part of the city and nobody will help her find her way, she's aided by a kind stranger who we're clued in as the audience was the same pauper girl turned geisha. That original act of kindness was an enduring happy memory for this woman in an otherwise bleak childhood, and she was drawn to Suzu because she was drawing watermelons in the dirt and looked like she needed help of her own, and the two bonded strongly for the day and she helped her find her way home safely from a bad part of town.

And it's things like this that happen over and over in the film, and forms an enduring theme about the capacity for goodness in humanity, and the power that goodness can have on people's lives even if we don't immediately realize it. Her husband, as it turns out, sought her out not because his family needed the help, but because he had been in love with them since their childhood. The abduction in the very beginning of the film - Suzu not only kept him company and kept his spirits up, but helped them both escape, and he spent the next decade plus trying to find the girl he fell in love with. And when the place they first met as children, was on the infamous bridge in Hiroshima that the American bombers used as a targeting landmark for their bombing. Implying if it wasn't for that kindness she had shown as a kid to a total stranger, she'd probably have still been in Hiroshima when the bomb dropped.

And then there's how Suzu deals with the tragedy that strikes her during one of the Allied bombings of Kure. She loses her right arm and her niece during an air raid in an incredibly traumatic experience. And it's heart breaking to watch her struggle with the guilt and the sorrow of it. She takes personal responsibility for what was a freak accident that was nobody's fault. If she hadn't been so air-headed, she might have been able to recognize the dangerous situation she was in, or been able to keep her niece alive. And she sees losing her right arm as her punishment - she lost everything and deserved it. Losing her ability to be useful to her family, to hold her lover's hand, to even partake in her personal passion to draw and paint. And during the worst part of the war, she finally gives into her sorrow and lashes out "everyone says to be grateful for being alive, but what have I got to be grateful for!?" And she resolves to leave her husband's house and return to Hiroshima which had been relatively unbombed and bothered by the war. And she comes to this frustrated conclusion in the very beginning of August in 1945.

And so the only reason why she survived the end of the war, is because her doctor didn't give her medical clearance to travel before the atomic bomb went off. Her family back in Hiroshima do not fare well, but she survived because of her injury. And Kure, being ~15 miles away, begins to see a lot of refugees from Hiroshima, and that helps put things into perspective for Suzu. And while her country surrenders, she vows to be a source of strength and courage for others to never give up hope. And the loss of her arm puts her at a disadvantage, but it also coincidentally leads her to other better things too. At the end of the film, she drops a rice ball fumbling with her meal with her left hand, and the ball rolls over to an orphan who Suzu and her husband only take notice of because of this act. And as we see through the credits, they decide to adopt and raise her and lead a happy life. And in a little bit of synchronicity, this orphan's mother dies doing the thing she wish she'd been able to do for her niece (hold her other hand, so that she could have been the one to take the brunt of the blast). This is something that's shown in graphic, grotesque detail and is the most violent imagery of the movie, but I'm not convinced we're necessarily seeing a real flashback since that's not the MO to show other character's perspectives than Suzu's. Rather it might be Suzu's imagination at work, and she's possibly projecting her own insecurities onto this orphan, and seeing the whole situation as an opportunity to do good and to give an unfortunate soul a new home and family in honor of her niece.


There's also a few other things I thought was really wonderful/noteworthy about the film. One of those things, about at the end where:
Japan surrenders and they hear the Emperor's proclamation over the radio. It's almost shocking to see how Suzu responds to it. Suzu had always been such a meek, reserved character. But while her family is resigned and relieved that the war is finally over, she gets angry and lashes out. "I thought we were supposed to fight to the last woman and child! But we're still here! I still have one arm and can fight!" At first, it sounded like zealotry, but I don't think that's the right reading. I think it's the expression of her pent up frustration and anger at the Government/situation that they endured all of this only to be completely futile. Suzu has kind of an awakening moment there, where she cries and curses and resents how "her body is made up of food from Taiwan" while in the background, just a few houses away a Korean flag gets hoisted up. And that was just a really powerful moment to me - where, if I'm reading things right, she's growing as a person and acknowledging the full breath of reality for maybe the first time in the movie. Acknowledging how awful the entirety of the war was when she never had really commented on the nature of any of it before. Acknowledging her passive complicity in the war. Acknowledging that things like forced slave labor was happening right under her nose and she was blissfully unaware. Acknowledging how as bad as she felt for herself, how much worse others must have it - like those in Hiroshima, or forced laborers, or those in the colonies that they stole food from.

So at the end of the movie, we see their struggles continue as the occupation moves in and the political void attempts to be filled. But the tone returns to happy silliness. There's a scene where Suzu and a friend (IIRC her sister-in-law?) wait in line for their daily food ration handed out by the American troops. And even though it had a cigarette package in their bowl, they both melt in joy as that food was still leagues better than anything they'd eaten in ages. And just watching their reaction, combined with the very next scene where they disappointingly go back to eating bland gruel at home, drew a giant smile across my face.


I could probably write about this film for hours, but I've vomited enough onto my keyboard for one night. TL;DR I thought the movie was an incredible experience, and one that upon reflection keeps impressing me more and more. It's a wonderful and life-affirming experience that helps remind and inform its audience about the lives of those who are now largely long gone - who have stories that are important for us to hear now more than ever. Stories that not just are anti-war, but pro-human and speak to the goodness we're capable of, even in the face of tremendous adversity in a hostile environment. I adored the film, I highly recommend it, and I'd look forwards to hearing other people's thoughts on it eventually. Maybe it's just the afterglow talking, but this movie easily goes right up to the top of the best anime of the last decade for me.

Last edited by WisteriaHysteria; Today at 12:25 AM. Reason: I got a date wrong off the top of my head - August 6th is the pertinent day to Hiroshima. The 8th was Nagasaki & the surrender.
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  #15730  
Old Yesterday, 09:47 AM
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Great write-up, WH. Unfortunately the theater in our area that shows the limited-run stuff hasn't (yet?) signed up for this one, and the closest showing that I know of would more-or-less entail a day trip. If that doesn't work out here's hoping it comes out on BD soon.

I'm with you on Grave of the Fireflies. I watched it once, at least fifteen years ago, and it's excellent, and important, and I doubt I'll be able to watch it ever again.
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  #15731  
Old Yesterday, 10:30 AM
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I rewatch Grave Of The Fireflies every once in a while. It's a very beautiful movie, and i think there's more to it than a grim look at war - for example, there's the guilt of the main character. But i don't know, i'm okay with crying a little watching movies.

I hope i can watch In This Corner of the World one of these days.
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  #15732  
Old Today, 12:14 AM
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Great write-up, WH. Unfortunately the theater in our area that shows the limited-run stuff hasn't (yet?) signed up for this one, and the closest showing that I know of would more-or-less entail a day trip. If that doesn't work out here's hoping it comes out on BD soon.
Thanks! Yeah, I'm pretty fortunate to have had the time and means to go travel a few hours to go see it, but if you can't then you can't. Looking up information, it seems like it's getting a DVD/BD release in Japan in exactly one month, and that the Japanese release will come with English subs. So if you're up for importing or sailing the seven seas it shouldn't be that much more of a wait. But the film was so good I suggest people trying to support if they can; I'll certainly purchase whatever physical BD release gets put out here, and also hunt down an artbook to import. I have a serious addiction to buying artbooks.

A few more random observations while reflecting on the movie:

-I didn't realize Manga Entertainment was still a thing, but there its logo was in front of the movie.

-I really enjoyed all the little details of the film that helped make everything feel alive. Which isn't a surprising thing considering the director's pedigree, but yeah. Simple things that would usually get overlooked in most movies or cartoons, In This Corner of the World makes it a point to nail and emphasize. Just something as innocuous as Suzu's skin tone changes constantly during the movie, depending on the season, or if she's wearing foundation/makeup, or if she's spent a lot of time outdoors recently, or if she's sick or trapped inside for long durations.

-I realize I never commented on the music. It's good! Sets the tone well, and the film's theme song (the song you hear in most of the trailers) is delightful.

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Originally Posted by aturtledoesbite View Post
having only seen two episodes so far

i think i like this Restaurant to Another World show
Seven episodes in, and it's a pleasant, if unspectacular show. There's no deep lore, or messaging, or themes here. And the show looks decent but not extraordinary or special. It's just comfy junk food that makes you feel good while watching, with the bonus of being largely guilt free. It's a lot of fun seeing generic fantasy characters discover and have their minds blown by modern cuisine.

I have a lot of small meaningless critiques, but I think the only thing that truly bothers me is how everyone has a favorite dish, and then ardently eats only that dish. This is a show about characters having their minds blown and horizons expanded by eating things they never dreamed could have existed. You'd think they'd be eager to try even more new things instead of calcifying their tastes and closing off their minds to other possibilities.
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  #15733  
Old Today, 06:50 AM
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Originally Posted by WisteriaHysteria View Post
I have a lot of small meaningless critiques, but I think the only thing that truly bothers me is how everyone has a favorite dish, and then ardently eats only that dish. This is a show about characters having their minds blown and horizons expanded by eating things they never dreamed could have existed. You'd think they'd be eager to try even more new things instead of calcifying their tastes and closing off their minds to other possibilities.
TIL: My parents are fantasy monsters.
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