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Old 06-03-2016, 02:35 PM
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Default Adventure - feedback on a pen and paper for my kids

I'm writing a staged, educational pen and paper for my 2 kids, Scarlet and Sebastian and I was hoping for feedback and advice . I'm calling it Adventure I, II and III. In Adventure I they'll learn simple arithmetic, spelling and colors, as well as appropriate interpersonal lessons like sharing, responsibility and dealing with adversity. Here are the rules so far:

Print out:
Adventure I

You can do anything in Adventure. Simply say what you want to do and the
Game Master will tell you how to do it.

(Every action more difficult than ‘easy’ is given a number between 1 and 100
by the Game Master (Dad). Choose an attribute which is appropriate for the
task and roll 1d6 for every point in that attribute you have. If you roll more
than the difficulty of the action, you succeed. Succeeding by 10 or more means
you also gain something. Succeeding by 25 or more means you also regain 1
health and 1 magic. Succeeding by 40 or more means you have an Amazing
Success, and achieve more than intended in an unexpected way, as well as
refilling all of your health and magic.)

Character Sheet:

Name your character and fill in any five Attribute bubbles with a black marker.
Now lightly fill in 2 health bubbles and 1 magic bubble with a pencil. Now fill in
one more Health or Magic bubble with a pencil. You’re ready to play!

Name of your Adventurer: _____________________

Strength Attribute: OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Dexterity Attribute: OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Endurance Attribute: OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Intelligence Attribute: OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Wisdom Attribute: OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Charisma Attribute: OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Empathy Attribute: OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Speed Attribute: OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Readyness Attribute: OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Health Points: OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Magic Points: OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Ability Name - Effect of Ability
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________

Inventory
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________



In the first session, begin telling the story of the Dragon who Wouldn't Share his Gold. During the story, whenever the Dragon steals gold, roll 1d6 and describe how successful he is based on the result of the roll. At first, he tries to steal gold from a very wealthy rock goblin who is just riding his salamander to his favorite hot springs for a dip. Next, he tries to steal gold from a bank in a small town where the residents all wear complicated hats and say AHA! whenever they realize something. Next he tries to steal gold from the King of Crescent Island whose Sky Guardian Knight hypogryphs are quite a challenge! Finally, he moves to a cave with all the gold he managed to collect where he is confronted by a kid named Lois.

Lois is played by mom and she gets a D20 to roll. When Lois has defeated the dragon by whatever means (most likely by talking to it and rolling well to make it stop being mean and give the gold back) she says while casting a spell:

"I summon two friends to help me keep this land safe!"

At this point the kids appear and begin interacting with the world. Lois also may reappear intermittently with snacks and advice, and to hear updates on how things are going in the land. Having the mean dragon return to help the kids marks the end of Adventure I, when it seems they have several basic concepts down, like addition, subtraction, colors and how to negotiate with NPCs. The Dragon will help them stop the main villain of Adventure I and become a permanent ally with a great knowledge of history to share (quests!).





An Example Session:

Wanting to introduce Multiplication, Sebastian's cool car is stolen by one of the Dark Wizard's minions who has the power to double things. In order to beat him, the kids learn to triple things, but during the final fight their enemy learns to quadruple and holds them at mercy for a cliffhanger ending.

What follows is the kids naturally obsessing over the ideas of 'doubling' and 'tripling' for an excruciating 23 hour waiting period for the next session, during which time I may 'triple' their M&M treats, or 'double' their dinner juice to reinforce the concepts.


Concepts:

Color Theory - Red, Blue and Yellow spells will open doors, but what is to be done with this Green box?! Any time a lock or magic barrier has a color, a color spell can open it.

Math - Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication and Division will be introduced and used more heavily as Adventure I progresses. When an enemy's HP reaches zero, they'll probably renegotiate with the heroes since they're too tired to argue or fight any longer!

Spelling - From time to time players may find items represented on 2'x2' squares of paper. Copying the words on them to your character sheet means you don't have to keep track of that piece of paper anymore. Additionally, the GM may have you write new things on your character sheet from time to time.

Sharing - When someone is using something, you can't take it, especially if it's important to prevent their pain or suffering. Taking something without asking is a crime in most places in the Kingdom! Similarly, if you have more than you need, you should share it. There's always someone out there who can use it. Being responsible with the inventory can lead to great rewards like new abilities and fun characters. Being selfish can lead to shallow rewards and uninspiring results.

Conflict - Conflict can't always be solved with words! Remember only to use your fists when every other option has been eliminated, lest the Knobbles come and teleport you somewhere less fun, like a yucky swamp. Using your strength to correct injustice will spread word of your Adventurer's fame and can lead to bigger quests.

Motive - A smiling, happy character who sings and steals from the Adventurers in the night, a grumpy character who is more generous than perceived, a sad character who is extremely scary and only wants a friend, but would never say so aloud... determining motive is occasionally necessary when dealing with the many denizens of the lands surrounding the Crescent Kingdom. When a character has a motive they are trying to hide, there may be a clue mentioned. Determining motive can help solve conflict and advance the plot more quickly.

Responsibility - In order to play Adventure you must have your pencil, character sheet and any slips of paper representing items you may have collected. Losing that piece of paper with "SWORD - 2D4+1" written on it means you lost the sword in Adventure too!



and so forth, more of that kind of thing, hopefully the idea gets across ok... as far as I've gotten in terms of solid plans yet

The plot is a thing I can write as I go 10 minutes before a session and based on whatever happened today that I think they're deficient with, like sharing or whatever, then it's just a lot of patient "Wait your turn"s and "What's 5 plus 2?"s and soforth until the energy peaks to a plot cliffhanger. Recurring characters are big with kids, as are 'Kinder' (dragonlance) type communities, or communities that communicate honestly and work together happily, as are comical voices, which I can do ok, so keeping them engaged isn't a concern.

I've play tested the original Adventure for 2 years with my 2 little brothers when they were around 6 and 8 respectively, and it was a very engaging way to teach I couldn't help but notice. Almost anything I wanted to teach them with math I merely made up a new enemy who used, say, division, and eventually my sister who was 11 and also playing, figured out the concept behind division and was using it herself to determine her own 'special gravity attacks' and 'morphing clone' attacks and stuff like that.

So, does anyone have thoughts? Concerns? Questions? Statements? Anecdotes? Pitchforks?
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Old 06-03-2016, 03:04 PM
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I will enquire whether you have seen this: http://versificator.net/year-of-adventure/
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Old 06-03-2016, 05:42 PM
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No, that's interesting. I guess I'll submit mine when it's done! And of course I'm playing Portcullis in a tab now too.
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